Tag Archives: graphic designer

graphic design stickers tubik

State of the Art: 15 Creative Graphic Design Concepts.

Famous graphic designer Stefan Sagmeister said “You can have an art experience in front of a Rembrandt… or in front of a piece of graphic design.” It’s hard to disagree with the expression since there are so many beautiful breathtaking graphic design concepts today. Various modern tools allow designers to create gorgeous graphic concepts that could easily be called artworks. However, graphic design isn’t purely artistic field. In one of our previous articles, we’ve defined graphic design as the sphere of human activity that lies at the crossroads of several directions, first of all, visual arts, communication, and psychology. By means of graphic (visual) elements such as images, types and fonts, pictograms, shapes and sizes, colors and shades, lines and curves graphic designers do the job of communication. Every visual element transfers the message, so it becomes functional.

 

Graphic design broadly covers all spheres of human life which deal with visual communication, from books and posters to sophisticated mobile applications or 3D animation. Today’s post presents 15 creative concepts by Tubik which we gathered to show you the diversity of graphic design.

 

Character concepts

 

tubikstudio graphic design

Girl and Flowers

 

The first concept introducing this set is an illustration of a girl with flowers. The work is a representation of flat design which is seen in the simplicity of shapes and visual elements. Despite the minimalist style the illustration accurately transfers bright and warm feeling of the springtime. The designer applied the color palette which shows a little girl’s sensitivity and purity. And, the final accent was made via shadows giving the flat picture more vivid look.

 

tubik_illustration_under_water

Underwater Explorer

 

Next concept is a flat design illustration presenting a character of underwater explorer. The designer applied various techniques combining classic and new approaches to flat design. Along with minimalistic shapes, there are noise textures across the illustration which are unusual for the direction. The dark background and bright elements, including the character’s costume, create deep contrast and enhance visual perception. One more detail complementing the illustration is the light lines which are barely seen still they make the picture complete.

 

Character design is used for different video and mobile games, the reason why designers often need to create more than one character for the particular project. The trick is that all the characters should be made in one original style so that they would be recognizable for gamers. Let’s look at the Wild West set of characters by Tubik.

 

illustration by tubikstudio

Sheriff Foxx

 

The first character created for this set was a sheriff named Jimmy Foxx. The designer has chosen the unique style of drawing putting accents to the details which transfer character traits. Creating the sheriff personality, the designer aimed at illustrating fearless and fair man with the sense of humor. The prominent mustache makes Jimmy look serious still there might be the smile hidden behind it. The main attribute is the big hat with the star signifying sheriff’s power.

 

character illustration tubik studio

Indian Dreamcatcher

 

Good stories require the presence of culture spirit, so the native American character was an obvious choice continuing this set. The designer sticks to the style applied to the first character. The character wears typical attributes such as a feather and painted mask. His eyes are closed which makes a character look wise. The circle around the character, which by the way is shown in the first illustration too, is decorated with a skull of a bird. Such an item usually serves for magical rituals so the character seems mysterious.

 

character design illustration tubik

Wild West Bandit

 

It’s hard to imagine a wild west story without a bandit terrorizing the citizens. The designer presents us a bad guy through the well-thought details. The bandit has a massive chin with a dimple and the dark straight hair. The cigarette and the golden tooth give him a brutal look. The hat and scarf are embellished with the skull signs to show that he’s a dangerous man.

 

City illustrations

 

There are many paintings and drawings illustrating the beautiful sights of various cities. Today designers have an opportunity to show cities from the different perspective — as digital artworks. Here is the set of city illustrations by Tubik.

 

city illustration digital art tubik

Hallo Lofoten

 

The first illustration presents Norwegian city Lofoten. Beautiful colors, nature, bright buildings and amazing mountains of this city have inspired the designer to create the illustration. The unique idea of this set of concepts is that they are framed like post stamps. The illustration is another example of the flat design which is created with simple geometric shapes. Lines on the water presents the reflection of the building so it feels more natural. Bright colors and various tones transfer the atmosphere of the city.

 

city illustration digital art tubik

Buongiorno Roma

 

Next city chosen for this set was Rome. The designer applies the complementary scheme of colors mixing blue and yellow, which makes the illustration full of contrasts similar the bright Italian city. Famous buildings are formed with simple shapes so the viewer can easily recognize the city. The designer creates lights and shadows on the landmark via different tones sticking to the minimalistic style.

 

guten tag bavaria illustration tubik

Guten Tag Bavaria

 

The last concept of the series illustrates Bavaria. The Neuschwanstein Castle, the nineteenth-century palace known all over the world, is presented as a magical place full of spring vibes. The mild color scheme is pleasant for human eyes enhancing visual perception.

 

Posters

 

Nowadays, graphic designers experiment a lot with poster creation following modern design directions such as flat design and applying various techniques. Digital artists design original posters which accurately bring people into the atmosphere of the films, cartoons, and other performances or events.

 

flat illustration

Star Wars Rouge One Illustration

 

No matter if you’re a fan of Star Wars or not, you obviously know what they are. This graphic design concept is devoted to the recent episode of Star Wars (Rogue One) which inspired the designer to create the original poster. The illustration presents main characters of the movie in minimalistic style. They are shown as focused, strong and brave heroes ready to fight for the better. Dark blue background creates the atmosphere of the deep space. Small but bright details such as characters’ clothes make this poster contrasting and interesting for the viewers.

 

pikachu poster tubik studio design

Pikachu Poster

 

Many people will associate last summer with the hype about mobile game Go Pokemon. Designers couldn’t stay unaffected so there are various design concepts devoted to the topic. Here is graphic design poster featuring one of the favorite pokemons Pikachu. The character’s body isn’t highlighted with lines still people can recognize the pokemon’s silhouette due to face parts and the yellow color of the background. Unusual presentation of the character is complemented with white lighting which is the special power of the little creature. Pokemon’s shadow is performed via repeating a word, “Pika” to be more specific. Such a creative idea will definitely strike a fan right in the heart.

 

poster design tubik studio

Suicide Squad Poster

 

Continuing the topic of mainstream, here is the poster for Suicide Squad movie. One of the brightest and deepest characters of a film is Joker who’s well-known for all DC comics fans. Creating this poster, the designer tried to catch and transfer the character’s features by means of digital graphics. The poster is dark transferring character’s mood still with the original lettering which presents laughing. Moreover, if you take a closer look at the poster, you’ll find small Joker’s signs hidden everywhere.

 

Covers

 

The cover illustration is a substantive art direction which deserves great respect. Graphic designers usually work long and hard to create one single composition that will do its function best. Let’s look at the cover designs by Tubik.

 

tubik studio illustration graphic design

Muscles Magazine

 

The first example presents a cover page for the magazine devoted to sports and active life. The issue shown here is about relations of sport and business. The idea behind the central illustration featuring the athlete was to immediately introduce the topic and at the same time add some fun and style. Graphic elements fully replace the photos creating the original look for the magazine.

 

tubik_illustration_jazz_tales_book

Tales of the Jazz

 

Many graphic designers secretly dream to create the cover design for their favorite book. Here is an interpretation of cover page for a collection of short stories by F. Scott Fitzgerald called Tales of the Jazz Age. The girl on the cover looks like a typical lady of the jazz age setting the right mood for the viewers. The mild color scheme and noise texture are nice to the visual perception.

 

Stickers

 

Today stickers are everywhere, printed and digital, especially popular in mobile apps. Tubik designers constantly work on original sticker packs for apps, websites and promotional campaigns.

 

healthy_stickers_shot_tubik_studio

 

stickers_tubik_studio_digital_art

Healthy Stickers

 

This design concept presents stickers of vegetables and fruit. They are meant to stimulate everyone to follow the healthy lifestyle and add energy to people as well. Bright colors make vegetables and fruit look juicy and yummy so it’s hard to resist the desire of tasting one of them in real life which means the stimulation works well. This flat picture is good for both printed and digital use.

 

Animated stickers mood messenger design tubik

Animated Stickers for Mood Messenger

 

Today stickers are popular in various messengers. This concept shows stickers designed for Mood Messenger. Each sticker presents a different emotion so that the users could chat quickly showing their friends how they feel. Detailed faces on this concepts are able to transfer any emotion clearly. Attractive illustrations can make applications interesting and fun for users setting great benefits for the owners.

 

Reviewing creative graphic design artworks is always inspiring. These fifteen concepts are only a few examples but there are much more of them waiting for you to look. Stay tuned and get inspired!


Welcome to see the designs by Tubik Studio on Dribbble and Behance

opera video design case study tubik

Case Study: Opera. Year-in-Review Video Design.

A picture is able to tell a lot instantly. It can inform, call associations,  set the mood and atmosphere, give the insights and wake up curiosity, get people inspired or engage further considerations and do that all in a beautiful and attractive manner. Still, to spark all that amazing potential, the picture needs to be created by a professional, who knows how to do that magic via talent, skills and experience.

 

Having the whole set of such professionals on-board, we finished the last year with an interesting and challenging project. In December Tubik team got the chance of creative collaboration with Opera to work on the bright and catchy year-in-review video. You could already have seen the video and design process presentation in Tubik Portfolio, and today we invite our readers to take a deeper look at this design story in a new case study.

 

opera video graphic design case study tubik

 

Task

 

Design of a short animated video «Opera 2016: Year in Review» within a tight timeline.

 

Process

 

Introducing a customer, Opera is a web browser developed by Opera Software. According to Opera Software, it had more than 350 million users worldwide in the 4th quarter 2014. Total Opera mobile users reached 291 million in June 2015. According to SlashGeek, Opera has originated features later adopted by other web browsers, including Speed Dial, pop-up blocking, browser sessions, private browsing, and tabbed browsing.

 

The initial stage of project discussion with the customer showed that they needed an animated video accomplished in an attractive manner immediately setting the positive and cheerful mood. The video had to present the essential milestones of the year when Opera, one of the actively used web browsers around the world, presented fresh innovative features to its numerous users. Opera team enjoyed bright colors and lifestyle object compositions and the approach they wished to use for the video was to devote each composition to a specific month when a particular feature was delivered. It was agreed that the visual performance should feature the 3D flat style, minimalistic animations and lush colors — everything that Tubik team is strong at.

 

Meanwhile, the early stage of discussions on creative process also established the biggest challenge of the project: the timeline was extremely short. The team of designers had only 5 days for design and animation of 8 complex flat illustrations full of details, transforming the company message, looking bright and fresh and keeping visual consistency to look natural in one video. This was the type of project that proved the great power of teamwork when all the participants of the creative process worked like a clock.

 

Illustrations

 

The first creative stage of the project had to result in a set of flat illustrations presenting the prominent innovations of the year: Ad Blocker, Battery Saver, Video Pop Out, Personal News, VPN, Faster Startup, Currency Converter. All the illustrations had to present the interiors decorated with bright details close and clear for every user, and also set the atmosphere of the particular season and the visual element showing the presented browser feature. In this way, combined in the video and replacing each other, the illustrations would support the feeling of the year flowing. Here is the final set presented to motion designers who had to do further work on breathing life into the pictures.

 

opera video animation case study

 

This is the intro illustration opening the video, setting the cheerful mood and giving the strong link with the brand.

 

opera video animation case study

 

This illustration presents the feature of native Ad-Blocker, which Opera presented in spring, so the color palette corresponds to the shades traditionally associated with this time of the year.

 

opera video animation case study

 

The next illustration presents the feature of Battery Saver, which got active in late spring: the season is supported with general bright and sunny color palette, flowers in the vase and green trees outside the window.

 

opera video animation case study

 

Another illustration was designed to present the feature of Video Pop Out, enabling users to watch videos while browsing. Big window shows the green plants and blue sky and the diagonal light shadows let us guess the shiny sun, the table sets the scene with a couple of books and a glass of lemonade, and even the video on the screen shows the sea shore and people having fun — everything allows viewers to understand easily that this user-friendly innovation was added in summer.

 

opera video animation case study

 

The next artwork is associated with the feature of a personal newsreader. A bit darker sky, a bit longer shadows, some clouds, the cup of tea and red-ripe apples on the tree say: when users got the ability to read the news right from their browser, the summer had almost finished. 

 

opera video animation case study

 

The feature of built-in VPN enhancing the privacy of browsing was set up in autumn, which us immediately clear from the view with yellow trees outside, while the passport seen on the table sets the strong connection with the matter of privacy.

 

opera video animation case study

 

Next illustration featured the faster speed of start-up loading, so the key visual element of the composition is the speedometer shown on the computer screen. It immediately sets association with the issue of speed while the color palette chosen for this artwork enables users to feel the vibes of deep autumn.

 

opera video animation case study

 

The last innovation to present was the built-in currency converter enabling users to shop online faster and easier. Some details in the picture, like the calculator, the decorative recognizable model of a shop placed on the shelf, the delivery truck behind the window as well as the layout on the screen set the atmosphere of shopping, while the outside view and the gifts let us know it’s the busy time of buying Christmas presents. 

 

Having a full set of illustrations approved by the client, motion designers came into play and presented the variants of transitions, while graphic designers worked on the fonts for the short descriptions to be used in the video. The fonts had to look highly readable and correspond to the general stylistic concept.

 

opera video animation case study

The sample of animated transitions between the slides livened up with the natural movements of the details close to motion in real life.

 

opera video animation case study

The sample of the fonts used on the slide in combination with the illustration

 

Final video

 

Five days of hard and coordinated work of the design team resulted in the final video of about 40 seconds showing the full set of key innovations Opera presented in 2016.

 

 

In one of the previous articles, devoted to design processes and work styles, we mentioned: the studio experience lets us believe that teamwork organized wisely and thoughtfully doesn’t take away designers’ individual space or freedom — vice versa, it adds to it the power of solid support and prospective ways for bigger and more complex, therefore more interesting and challenging projects and tasks. The project for Opera became one of the convincing proofs.

 

opera video design case study tubik

 

In their testimonial to Tubik team, Opera Software team mentioned: «The loose storyboard and tight timeline we presented you with were undoubtedly a challenge but everyone is very happy with how well your team delivered on it!» No doubt, this project became not only a great and absorbing challenge but also the case of fruitful collaboration and bright finale for the extremely busy design year.


Welcome to check out the presentation of Opera project in Tubik Portfolio

Welcome to see the designs by Tubik Studio on Dribbble and Behance

ted talks graphic design typography books

TED-talks: Typography, Books, Graphic Design.

It’s not a secret how diverse and influential is graphic design nowadays. It covers multiple purposes and serves a great deal of diverse spheres of human life and activity. Today it is enhanced and strengthened by broad opportunities of modern technologies, but new generations of the best designers keep following the roots and getting inspired by the experts.

 

One of the ways to inspiration we find productive and highly professional here in Tubik Studio is TED videos. Perhaps you remember the collections we have already suggested watching: 20 TED talks for designers about diverse design issues and 10 TED-talks for creatives from different spheres. Today we’re going to recommend you a new set of professional and informative TED and TEDx-talks that we find interesting, useful and helpful. 

 

Here is the collection of 10 TED-talks all with the descriptions given on the TED website or YouTube presentations. This time they are focused on the issues of graphic design. Most of them are already classic, sometimes even could be called legendary, and that makes them even more precious as they have been successfully checked with the time and practice. The ability to analyze take the best from the past usually broadens the creative horizons and becomes a solid foundation for innovative thinking. So, enjoy watching and feel the energy of great masters!

 

My life in typefaces — Matthew Carter

 

Pick up a book, magazine or screen, and more than likely you’ll come across some typography designed by Matthew Carter. In this charming talk, the man behind typefaces such as Verdana, Georgia and Bell Centennial (designed just for phone books — remember them?), takes us on a spin through a career focused on the very last pixel of each letter of a font.

 

 

Intricate beauty by design — Marian Bantjes

 

In graphic design, Marian Bantjes says, throwing your individuality into a project is heresy. She explains how she built her career doing just that, bringing her signature delicate illustrations to storefronts, valentines and even genetic diagrams.

 

 

The art of first impressions — in design and life — Chip Kidd

 

Book designer Chip Kidd knows all too well how often we judge things by first appearances. In this hilarious, fast-paced talk, he explains the two techniques designers use to communicate instantly — clarity and mystery — and when, why and how they work. He celebrates beautiful, useful pieces of design, skewers less successful work, and shares the thinking behind some of his own iconic book covers.

 

 

Designing books is no laughing matter. OK, it is. — Chip Kidd

 

Chip Kidd doesn’t judge books by their cover, he creates covers that embody the book — and he does it with a wicked sense of humor. In one of the funniest talks from TED2012, he shows the art and deep thought of his cover designs. This talk is from The Design Studio session at TED2012, guest-curated by Chee Pearlman and David Rockwell.

 

 

Can design save newspapers? — Jacek Utko

 

Jacek Utko is an extraordinary Polish newspaper designer whose redesigns for papers in Eastern Europe not only win awards, but increase circulation by up to 100%. Can good design save the newspaper? It just might.

 

 

Why write? Penmanship for the 21st Century — Jake Weidmann

 

What is the future of writing in the digital age, and why does it matter? In this surprising talk, Master Penman Jake Weidmann explores the connections between the pen and how we learn, think, and carry our cultural heritage at a time when the very act of writing is being dropped from school curricula across the country.

 

Jake Weidmann became the youngest person to receive his Master Penman certificate in July 2011. He works across several mediums including drawing in pencil and charcoal; pen and ink; painting in acrylic, airbrush, oil and gouache; sculpting in wood, bone, antler and clay; and is versed in numerous forms of calligraphy. He is best known for the integration of flourishing and hand- lettering in his art. Jake also designs his own hand-made pens. He, like his pens, travels the globe, reintroducing this Old World art form and cultivating its relevance in the world of today, of tomorrow, and forevermore.

 

 

The beauty of data visualization — David McCandless

 

David McCandless turns complex data sets (like worldwide military spending, media buzz, Facebook status updates) into beautiful, simple diagrams that tease out unseen patterns and connections. Good design, he suggests, is the best way to navigate information glut — and it may just change the way we see the world.

 

 

Wake up & smell the fonts — Sarah Hyndman

 

Sarah shares with us a story of type and invites us to consider our emotional response to the printed word. Each font/typeface has a personality that influences our interpretation of the words we read by evoking our emotions and setting the scene. We all understand this instinctively but it happens on a subconscious level. Sarah shows us that conscious awareness of the emotional life of fonts can be entertaining and ultimately give us more control over the decisions we make.

 

Designer Sarah Hyndman explores typography as we experience it in our every day lives under the banner of Type Tasting. Since the launch in 2013 she’s curated an exhibition at the V&A for the London Design Festival, been interviewed on Radio 4’s Today, taken Type Tasting to South by Southwest in Austin, Texas and has been commissioned to write a book.

 

Sarah has been a graphic designer for over 15 years, working in agencies before setting up design company With Relish. After studying an MA in Typo/Graphics at the London College of Communication she was invited back as a guest tutor.

 

 

Typography — now you see it — Shelley Gruendler

 

Dr Shelley Gruendler is a typographer, designer, and educator who teaches, lectures, and publishes internationally on typography and design. When she is not traveling the world as the founding director of Type Camp International, she is proud to live in the Canadian Typographic Archipelago.

 

 

The art of kinetic typography — Dan Boyarski

 

Dan Boyarski is a professor and former head of the School of Design at Carnegie Mellon University, where he has been for thirty-two years. His interests lie in visualizing complex information, interface and interaction design, and how word, image, sound, and movement may be combined for effective communication. In the spring of 1999, the Design Management Institute awarded Dan the Muriel Cooper Prize for «outstanding achievement in advancing design, technology, and communications in the digital environment.»

 

 

Check out the updates here, new collections of wise creative thoughts are already around the corner!

tubikstudio illustration UI

Illustration in UI. Art in Action.

The phrase well-known all over the world and claiming that “…a picture is worth a thousand words” is still popular and actual nowadays, getting more and more shades of meaning with human progress. People still get attracted with visual images such as pictures and photos faster than with the copy, in lots of cases image is recognized and understood more quickly, and even more, it is able to satisfy not only informative but also aesthetic needs of the recipient. Taking this into account, today we would like to consider some functions of illustration in perspective of modern UI/UX design.

 

The essence of illustration

 

According to the definition of Merriam-Webster dictionary, the verb «illustrate» in its wide-spread and most recognized meanings means «to clarify»; «to make clear by giving or by serving as an example or instance»; «to provide with visual features intended to explain or decorate» ; «to show clearly». However, it should be remembered that initially it derived from Latin «illustrare» meaning «light up, enlighten, illuminate». Although it is the obsolete meaning now, it really adds much to all the diverse potential of illustration in digital graphic design, in particular for UI/UX projects.

 

Historically, illustration has a long and amazing path and perhaps could be included into the list of the most diverse directions in art. On the basis of its progress in print production like books, comics, magazines and newspapers, advertising materials and so on, illustration as the sphere of visual art found the new lease of life with the development of technology. The design tasks got even more challenging and therefore interesting. Digital illustration as well as the platforms for which it had to be created brought new horizons in this sort of art.

 

illustration sketches tubik studio

Sketches 

 

Anyway, no matter where illustrations appeared, how and for what purpose they were created, the basics were still the same: the aim of illustration was to enlighten, to clarify, to deliver the message by means of visual elements. In modern graphic design, therefore, illustration is an image which creates a visual message. To make the illustration functional, this image should be easily recognizable and preferably the information it transfers should be decoded similarly if not identically by different viewers.

 

Earlier we have already published the article about such small but highly meaningful visual elements as icons, their types, functions and vital role in creating efficient UI/UX solutions. As well as the icons, illustrations, mostly being more detailed and artistic images, also have important functions behind them and often become the effective way to boost usability and at the same way to present nice artistic elements.

 

Features

 

Illustration used as a part of the interface should become a working functional element. Making the decision in favor of using illustration of any kind on the screen or a webpage, the designer has to think thoroughly how to take everything possible from its broad potential. Illustration in most cases becomes the efficient way to provide the user with a piece of information faster and easier than it could happen with the text. Using illustration in layout, it is possible to fulfill multiple user needs that is why it is so popular in user interfaces of different kinds.

 

So, to become an efficient element of a layout, illustration applied in user interface should be:

— meaningful

— recognizable

— preferably straightforward and unambiguous

— clarifying

— attractive

— harmonic and corresponding with general stylistic concept of the interface

— improving usability and user experience in general

— not overloading the screen or page.

 

Considering these positions, let’s look at some practices of using illustration in design.

 

Mascots and characters

 

Perhaps, one of the most efficient ways to apply illustration techniques in design both as a visual and functional element are mascots of different types. Mascots are images, usually personified, which in most cases represent the brand, product or service identity and therefore become its symbolic convention via all the application or website.

 

tubik studio ui concept

Veggie App Concept 

 

Mascot as a graphic design object needs great attention as they have to represent the nature of the brand or product. Mascot becomes the element of identity and inter-connector between the user and the product. In many cases, mascot is the basic element of communication and interaction, therefore in different states it can become the basic way to deliver the message to the user.

 

Tubik Studio logo for Saily app

Design version of Saily app mascot 

 

Obviously, mascots are very helpful in interfaces: they liven up the general process, catch up user’s attention, become the memorable element, create important support for a stylistic concept and make the illusion of direct communication with the user. Also, wisely used in illustrations featuring actions or interactions, mascot can become a good way to avoid using too much copy on the screen and in this way save space for other important elements of layout or just more “air” also really needed to create good perception of data on the screen or page.

 

mascot illustration tubik studio

Sheriff Foxx Character 

 

Tutorials and tool-tips

 

One of the good ways to use the illustration in UI are diverse tutorial screens and any kinds of tool-tips. In this case they fully reveal their potential in explanation and clarification. The options can be totally diverse from simple icon-like to artistic and sophisticated ones. Illustrations of this kinds become a good way to boost usability minimizing the necessity of using the copy on the screens. They are particularly efficient in apps for kids and youngsters as they usually feel this sort of explanations more user-friendly.

 

Saily Illustration Tubik Studio

Illustration Saily Tubik Studio design

Illustrated tool-tips for Saily App 

 

illustration tutorial app tubik

Tutorial App Screens 

 

Rewards

 

One more good case when a designer could consider the option of using illustration in the interface is the case of various awards and rewards, with which the user marks any kind of progress in the app or website, sort of stickers, medals, signs, coins and the like. Again, the options can be extremely diverse, from simple symbolic shapes to elaborately drawn detailed images, but anyway, used wisely and accomplished in accordance with general stylistic decision of the whole app or website, they become one more step towards user-friendly interactions and positive user experience.

 

good_sign_app_tubikstudio

Good Sign App Concept

 

tubik illustration interface

Simple Blog App 

 

Theme and style illustrations

 

Illustrations of this kind are usually applied in a user interface basically to provide visual support of the general stylistic concept and perhaps the topic of the app or a website as well as events, seasonal features and so on. Their main purpose is to support all the functional elements of the layout with general harmonic and attractive appearance of the screen or page. It should also be mentioned that in some cases illustration of this type can add the element of gamification or more artistic feel to the whole product. In one of our previous articles, considering the points of creating potentially viral UI/UX design, we mentioned that one of the ways is to add some unique, custom and stylish visual elements so that people wanted to share them with the others as well as satisfy their aesthetic needs. Illustration have a great potential in this perspective.

 

tubik_illustration_under_water

Underwater Explorer 

 

tubik illustration design

Weather Icons Presentation 

 

tubik studio UI design

Offer App Coupon 

 

Obviously, this article is only the start of the discussion of multiple and diverse functions of illustration in UI design and we are going to continue it in further articles sharing our studio experience. However, even the general basics mentioned today are still the strong support of the most important position about UI design process: any elements of the interface should be purposeful and functional, supporting the user, enhancing usability and providing the solid basis of positive user experience and problem-solving. Illustrations are not the exception and their application in the interface should be thoroughly thought-out and accomplished with the target user in mind at every stage of the process.


Welcome to see the designs by Tubik Studio on Dribbble and Behance

tubik studio icons design

Basic Grammar for Designers: Must and Mustn’t in Design

There are a lot of tips what designers can do and what they should avoid doing to become successful. Most of them are reasoned and really helpful, especially for beginners in the sphere. And today we have decided to enlarge this great global collection with our set of thoughts, which are separated along basic modal verbs of English — “must” and “mustn’t”. All the points mentioned below are taken from our studio experience and we have had a really great lesson of basic English grammar, discussing all those positions together.

So, let’s get started!

 

Designers must:

 

  • Learn constantly

 

There is no point on the way where being a designer you can stop learning. Sure, if you work on several projects at the same time, it’s hard to find the time for reading professional books or blogs. However, finding this time is vital for your success, otherwise, you risk losing the essence and fundamentals.

monday post

 

  • Follow the trends

 

There are loads of ways how to keep yourself up to date with the latest and freshest trends. Following blogs and social accounts of well-known and prospective design studios, exploring established design platforms like Dribbble and Behance, watching speeches by famous designers and presentations of new products in the field, communicating with other designers at various events — all of these steps can be extremely helpful in keeping your professional horizons as broad as possible.

tubik studio designers 1

 

  • Try new tools

 

It doesn’t mean that all the professional tools, soft and applications you are going to try will be useful and helpful. Moreover, it doesn’t mean that they are going to be better than the earlier ones. However, in most cases, they will provide something new enabling you to obtain new solutions, to save your time, to create new features. The more tools you try, the higher is the chance to find those which are perfect for you and your project needs.

tubik studio work

 

  • Communicate with colleagues

 

Communication with colleagues can be both real and virtual. In both cases, it matters for your professional recognition. Don’t forget that design, as well as business, is always done by people. Socializing with colleagues can end up being involved in interesting projects, recommended to potential customers or invited to speak in front of other designers. The basic aim of communication is the exchange of information and this information can be strategic for your professional growth.

brainstorm session Tubik studio

 

  • Present and share

 

As we have already mentioned in our tips for beginning designers, sharing and presentation is the way to get not only recognition but also feedback which opens new vision of your own work. It is a well-known fact that being objective and fair about your own project is quite hard, so presentation and discussion of your work with others can be very helpful. Moreover, sharing your designs at design platforms like Dribbble and Behance, your thoughts in blogs and your professional life and routine in social accounts attract your potential customers and brings home the bacon.

tubik studio case study

 

  • Use technologies they design for

 

Designer should know what is the path of a user when he uses this or that technology. When you design the application not knowing how to use a smartphone and how it differs from using a tablet, the chances to create a viable product are really low. Updating the soft and operation system of your devices plays the same important role. Creating something for users, you should be a user yourself.

tubik studio designer 1

 

  • Use social networks

 

This point combines several aims mentioned above. Using social networks not just for private, but in professional aspect gives you three important benefits: you understand how it works from user’s view and can apply this knowledge in your job; you can get a lot of information on how other designers work and communicate with them in fast and unobtrusive way; and you can present yourself and your professional abilities on the established and promoted platform with great number of users.

 

  • Keep themselves fit and healthy

 

This actually doesn’t look like a professional tip. However, your health and fitness is the basis of your success. Putting it aside, to ‘better times’, you risk losing your ability to work and that is the thing to be remembered, always. Give your eyes the break, walk around, stretch your back muscles, eat clean and find your own enjoyable way to exercise, let it be swimming, running or anything else. It may sound «out-of-business», but your business totally depends on it.

 

  • Listen to their customers

 

If you want to make design business giving you money, you should study how to satisfy customer’s needs and sell your service. So, always listen to your customer, and ask loads of questions if needed. Get into details, feel their pain, understand their targets — and they will later give you not only money, but also promotion, which is even more important.

tubik studio design1

 

  • Test as much as possible

 

Experts in usability say that it’s impossible to be fully objective about the project you work on, especially if it’s long-term. Moreover, you are not a magician turning into anyone who will use your product to understand the best way of doing anything. Therefore, creating the idea is hot enough. You should test it to grab the real practical data and improve your product.

tubik studio designer

 

  • Present themselves as personalities

 

Presenting your professional achievements in global design community is significant on the way to recognition. But if you want to make the process even more efficient, give your work the personality. Let people know, who you are, show them how you work, share your opinions, instagram some routine. Support your skills with your personality to make them both more powerful.

 

  • Organize their day

 

If you want to make design your business rather than your hobby, organization and time-management are vital. Otherwise, you will not be able to provide the customer with the efficient workflow and get lost in tasks. Set the regime, split the tasks into smaller steps with their own due-dates and don’t neglect the to-do lists. It can make you surprised with the amount of job you are able to do when your day is properly organized.

tubik studio design

 

Designers mustn’t

 

  • Look down at their customers

 

Sure, in most cases you know more or the hell much more than your customer. However, it doesn’t make you the enlighten and doesn’t give you rights to be rude and arrogant. Your task is to understand and help rather than to humiliate and self-express.

 

  • Stop learning

 

The day you think that you are the super expert and there is nothing new for you anymore is the halfway to the death of your designer career. Self-education should never stop, especially in such dynamic field as web and app design.

 

  • Ignore users’ needs

 

Designer should always remember that in most cases neither they nor their customers are the deciding voice. The users of the final product are. Therefore, ignoring their needs is going to give a product which may be awesome and highly artistic but absolutely non-viable.

 

  • Say direct “no” to customer

 

Certainly, that doesn’t mean that the customer is always right. If all the customers knew how to create their designs, they would do it themselves and designers would get extinct. But in our world and our days, your customers are people who are asking your help and what is really important they do it not for free. So, when you do not agree with the customer’s solution or you see the better ways of solving the problem, get into the issue, ask about all the details of this wish and then offer your vision in solid but polite way, reasoning every step of your solution to the problem.

 

  • Avoid communication

 

Communication is used here globally. Obviously, when you are deep into the particular project and, let’s say, work out the complex screens, you won’t be happy to get distracted just to feel that feeling of communication. Communication here means to be ready to brainstorm, to delegate the parts of the tasks in wise and open way when it’s needed for the team or project sake. Also, it happens that designers avoid communication with customers preferring just to get the task and accomplish it how they see it right. This way can lead the designer of spending a long time accomplishing the project which is absolutely different from what the customer wants and then cause long and hard hours of frustration while redesigning.

 

  • Start the project without research

 

Starting the project without preliminary research can also cost you wasted time and effort. Without investigation and exploration you will not be aware of the situation on the market, needs, and wishes of your target audience, strong and weak sides of the competition, so the risk to create something not original or not appropriate is much higher.

 

  • Forget about coding and development

 

One more thing to bear in mind is that the product designer creates is going to be coded on the next stage. Sure, most designers want to see their products alive, working, and presenting their bright skills, and if you are one of them give out the result which will be not only visual but also supported with the materials, helping developers to breathe the life into it.

 

  • Ignore competition

 

The ever-time truth of martial art is that to be prepared you should know your enemy by sight. Certainly, design is not the war field, but this law still works. And the most important benefit of exploring the competition is not to reveal or define the enemies, but to understand what is already going on in the market and analyze how to make your product stand out from the crowd of the like.

 

  • Forget about deadlines

 

If design is your hobby or you do it just for pure art, you can ignore any kind of deadlines and time restrictions. But if you want to make design your business, you should be ready to stick to deadlines and study how to manage your time. Otherwise, you risk losing the projects and perspectives just because of breaking deadlines.

 

  • Wait for the muse

 

Creative people often say that they cannot work without necessary inspiration. They are just waiting for the muse which will help them to find the best solution. Like it or hate it, but muse which doesn’t arrive on time is not the reasonable explanation of broken deadlines or inappropriate result. Therefore, if you want to have the serious name and get respected by the clients, if you want to have a constant flow of projects and earn more and more, find the ways to call your muse when you need it, not waiting when it wants to come. By the way, the process of research and sketching for the project is one of the great ways. Appetite comes with eating, muse comes with working.


Welcome to see the designs by Tubik Studio on Dribbble and Behance