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ux designers tubik

10 Ways How User Experience Designers Bring Value to the World

What makes us feel happy at work? Choosing the career path or switch, we ask and answer tons of questions and try to analyze the variety of factors. No wonder: that choice determines our lifestyle, relations, personal and professional growth for the big part of everyday life. Recently, we’ve run into this sort of question at Quora which sounded like «How do User Experience designers (Mobile and Web) provide value to humanity?» and became the ground for today’s article.

 

The question is definitely great and the answer, in particular, can be important for the young specialists who are considering this career. Not only in terms of the humanity, but also in terms of yourself adding something to the global progress. Whatever people tell about money as the key point, in creative spheres there is a variety of research showing that designers need the feeling of creative growth and participation in global progress not less than a good salary. One of the articles in Harvard Business Blog mentions three big reasons that are common in making people happy at work: a meaningful vision of the future, a sense of purpose and great relationships. Specifying the sense of purpose, they state: «People want to feel as if their work matters, and that their contributions help to achieve something really important. And except for those at the tippy top, shareholder value isn’t a meaningful goal that excites and engages them. They want to know that they — and their organizations — are doing something big that matters to other people.» Being aware of the destinations and seeing themselves the part of globally important processes, people tend to make the choice of a particular career as good for them.

 

ux designers brainstorm tubik

 

Without getting dip into the sphere, you can see UX designers like people working out endless flows of screens. At the first sight for many people who don’t deal with all the aspects, this job looks neither interesting nor creative. And the aspect of its value for humanity also seems to be not so obvious. Here in Tubik, we’ve been lucky to see the sphere of UX design high and deep, in all its diversity, creating digital products for the companies worldwide. And what we’ve seen and taken part in, makes us certain to answer: UX designers do provide a considerable value for humanity.

 

Before starting the list of aspects for this value, let’s check the terminology. In one of the issues of UI/UX Design Glossary, we described UX in the following way: it is the general attitude and emotional feedback that user has at different stages of using the product. In terms of digital products, such as websites or applications, UX is a comprehensive term involving all the possible stages of user engagement. UX is based on several key factors such as usability, utility, desirability, attractiveness, the speed of work etc. If all the logic and possible issues of product implementation into real life are analyzed and designed properly, it forms positive user experience which means that users are able to satisfy their needs in a fast, easy and pleasant way. Positive user experience remains one of the strongest factors of retaining users.

 

Tubik-Studio ux design

 

Working on the UX for a digital product such as a website or mobile app, UX designers have to concentrate on such aspects as:

usability (the product is convenient, clear, logical and easy to use)
utility (the product provides useful content and solves users’ problems)
accessibility (the product is convenient for different categories of users)
desirability (the product is attractive and problem-solving, it retains users and creates the positive experience which they are ready to repeat).

 

All of the mentioned positions present the value for people in terms of particular operations done day in and day out as well as global processes in different spheres like commerce and business, education, management, housekeeping, communications and so on, and so forth. On the ground of everything above mentioned, we could assume several points of the value which UX designers provide to humanity creating a wide variety of digital products.

 

What are the values brought by UX designers?

 

1. They support fast, easy and productive communication worldwide via products like various messengers, social networks etc. Communication is one of the key reasons why people turn to websites and apps, and its flow has a great impact on user’s life, from personal chats with family and friends to professional online conferences and business negotiations. Creating user experience for this purpose, designers have to study the needs of the audience and offer the appropriate solutions which will make the product helpful for getting in touch with other people.

 

bikers website blog

StarDust Bikers Website

 

2. They support international collaboration working over successful experience for apps enabling productive work within a team scattered around. Today the world has a number of applications and tools enabling professionals to work effectively from different places. That creates new business contacts and supports a great variety of international projects. And by the way, sets the ground for creating new workplaces, raising profits and developing welfare which, no doubt, sound like credible value. The platforms, apps, tools and software enabling specialists from different cities, countries, and continents to operate in a big number of professional activities, all have user experience designers behind them.

 

3. They support everyday life of millions of people with digital products that solve actual problems (like to-do lists or apps for taking notes), inform (like news websites or different blogs), and entertain (like apps for listening to music and watching films as well as tons of games). Every day, using quite basic and simple things like alarms, news platforms, video apps or music players, most users don’t even imagine that simplicity of those interfaces and navigation which makes all the flow intuitive are the result of thorough work which takes many hours. User experience designers are the ones who have to build these products helpful and pleasant-to-use on the balance of applied content, target audience and business goals.

 

upper app UI design case study

Upper App

 

4. They support and improve core spheres of human life like health care, education, commerce, and self-expression. In this aspect, UX designers are the contributors into different fields of human growth and development. They create the flows of interactions and layouts for educational websites, applications used in medical treatment and health care, data analysis, technical support and other directions. Add to it the variety of specialized platforms where people share their creative outcome like artworks, music or pieces of writing — all of them need experience and interactions appropriate for these needs.

 

health care app interactions tubik studio

Health Care App

 

5. They make technology more accessible which means closer to people of different ages and nationalities, levels of education and tech literacy, physical and mental abilities or disabilities. User research is one of the core parts of UX design, and one of the objectives is finding the solutions for problems, which could make using the product hard and tricky for some categories of users. Diligent UX designers aim at creating products which will be inclusive and accessible for users of different abilities.

 

6. They support the concept of non-stop learning through life via educational and information resources. Motion is life, and motion through the ocean of information around is not an easy part of it. People are born with natural curiosity, the wish of getting knowledge and being informed. UX designers contribute in this eternal human movement creating flows at which users, readers, learners will not get lost under the tons of data. They apply the techniques and methods of information architecture to make the interfaces organized and problem-solving for their readers.

 

tubik studio web ui design

Birds of Paradise Encyclopedia

 

7. They respond to the human need of harmony and aesthetic satisfaction finding the ways to make digital products both useful and beautiful. There are many people who support the idea that digital products of today should be minimalist and purely functional. However, life is not just like that: practice shows that people want to both solve the problems and feel aesthetic satisfaction using apps and websites. The balance of these things is included in responsibilities of UX designers.

 

calendar-app animation tubik

Calendar App 

 

8. They support the products which simplify and automate decent mechanic processes saving time for activities applying creative human energy. More and more products nowadays, including chatbots, are able to automate simple things, for example, scheduling, computing, checking grammar in writing, analyzing and organizing received data etc. Those things allow people to accomplish some tasks faster and easier and free their time for more creative tasks which machines cannot do. This is one more side of positive user experience.

ngin_app_car_statistics_animation_tubik

NGIN App

 

9. They keep the balance between the rational and irrational parts of human life and activity. UX designers work on the crossroads of rational and emotional sides of human life: creating apps and websites, they have to consider both logical thinking and typical interaction models as well as emotional background which can greatly influence user behavior.

 

cinema app interaction UI

Cinema App

 

10. They make beauty working and logical as well as they make simple operations beautified and pleasant to the human eye. No special comments are needed. UX designers know how to get the efficient combination of beauty and functionality, doing it in the way which the particular product and audience require.

 

home budget web interface

Home Budget app

 

Surely, this list is not full as well as the issue is not so purely positive. There are many aspects of the job of UX designers, some of which are inspiring while the others are challenging or confusing. Still, we suppose the given positions are a good ground to believe that the job of UX designer is the one creating real value which has plenty of shades and tones. On the other hand, this variety of values added by the representatives of the given professional field brings out the number of responsibilities for the job, which should be also considered and kept in mind.

 

ux designers tubik

 

Life of UX designers is not the life of a magician flying in silver clouds and saving the world with every move of a hand. No, it’s a flow of rigorous research and analysis, creative effort and review of the slightest details — and many other things to mention, as well as in any other job. However, that is definitely the job that brings something precious for the humanity of today and tomorrow.


Welcome to see the designs by Tubik Studio on Dribbble and Behance

Welcome to read us on Quora

design events benefits

5 Big Benefits of Attending Local Design Events

Being a designer is not only about pure creative process. Design is also about communication with colleagues, managers, clients and experts. This connection can be done not only in the flow of current projects but also at a variety of design events held all over the world. And, as the famous author and speechwriter James Humes stated, «The art of communication is the language of leadership» which works prominently in creative spheres of human activity. So, today let’s briefly review what are the key benefits which designers can get from attending specialized events like conferences, meetups, workshops and so on.

 

1. You absorb knowledge and inspiration from experienced designers

 

If you have had the chance to read about art education a couple of centuries ago, perhaps, you learned the stories how great masters started their path from apprenticeship for masters of that time. It was the way which in the case of appropriate diligence and patience could open the door to the world of genuine great art. Centuries have passed, generations have changed, but this way still hasn’t got lost in time: we learn the secrets of the job from those who have already got them through practice. That is one of the reasons to attend the design event, especially for those who only start their career in the field. Some of the speakers will give you useful tips on design tools while others will share their experience in methods of time management and collaboration. Some of them will tell you about new trends in design while others will show the flows of real projects. There is even a chance that there will be speakers who will show you the methods and ideas you’d never like to try — and even this result is positive at it saves your time and effort for testing all them by yourself. Don’t waste the opportunity to take what they are ready to share. Surely, to get the chances of positive experience higher, it’s advisable to check the program of conference or meetup beforehand.

 

You may like recognized designers more or less but remember: they ARE already well-known and successful. That means there always exists something you can learn from them. Analyze, get inspired, try to see the best features so that you could get the technique. It was effective hundred years ago in old-school art education and it still works now. 

 

2. You get live communication with experts

 

Reading the thoughts provided in the previous point, it’s easy to argue: why would you need to attend the real event if tons of them can be found via the Internet in videos, photo workshops, podcasts, articles, and books? The reason is simple: all those ways of getting professional knowledge and training are great and helpful, but none of them can fully replace the experience of live communication. The precious moments when you can ask the question right in the process of live talk flow are irreplaceable. Moreover, make no mistake: conferences and meetups are the places where everyone, including speakers and organizers, is ready and open to communicate with you while in ordinary days full of creative search, management and loads of current tasks they do not plan their time to answer the questions from other designers. Cool if they can do it but it happens not so often whereas for the professional events it is a natural state of things: everyone goes there to communicate.

 

One of the upcoming local events of that kind called Shuba Design Conference will be held in Dnipro, Ukraine in the late May. Its philosophy is all built around the idea of providing the space for effective and fruitful communication of creative people both in form of the speeches from the experts and live brainstorming with colleagues. This year the motto of the event is «Design beyond the borders» setting the new perspectives and new flows of creative energy in the sphere. Furthermore, the organizers bring out the opportunities for designers to participate in the contest of posters «BORDER STUDIES» and express their ideas in the artworks which will be accepted until 14 May. If you are interested to know more, check the details here. Let us know — we’ll be happy to get in touch!

 

design conference shuba ukraine

 

3. You can get the qualified feedback on your work

 

While most design meetups set the platform where experts share their knowledge and experience, some events also create the foundation for getting live feedback on design portfolios. One of the founders of this movement worldwide is Behance, the well-known design platform for portfolios in a variety of creative directions. Behance Portfolio Reviews held in different corners of the world let every designer get a professional and objective review from the local design community. This is one more upcoming design event we are looking forward to this May — Behance Portfolio Reviews Dnipro inviting young designers to present and discuss their portfolios.

 

behance portfolio reviews dnipro 

 

4. You set new business contacts in design sphere

 

One more big reason to attend design events is directly connected to business issues: this is usually the fruitful ground for making new contacts useful for your career. It works the same as at any other specialized event: you can get in touch with other designers for collaboration on complex projects as well as you can meet new potential clients or investors. Again, live communication and real impressions make a considerable impact on decisions which can change the prospects of individual designers or even design teams for better. 

 

5. You get refreshed from your routine and check the trends discussed at the moment

 

Last but not least is the reason of refreshment, actual for professionals from any creative sphere. Getting dip into specific tasks and working on several design projects simultaneously, artists really need that breath of fresh air which will reboot their creative energy and give new directions of vision. So, if you see the event with interesting speakers or themes actual for you, don’t hesitate to give yourself a moment of new experience: it will take you away from you current work for some time, but it will let you get back with new ideas and impressions absorbed from the design community.


Welcome to get more details on Shuba Design Conference (Dnipro, Ukraine, 27 May 2017)

Welcome to get more details on Behance Portfolio Reviews (Dnipro, Ukraine, 13 May 2017)

toonie alarm UI design

Case Study: Toonie. UI Animation Development.

In most cases, when users deal with animation in the interface, it takes short seconds and feels as natural as a breath. Being far from design and development routine, it’s almost impossible to imagine that these brief and simple interactions take long hours of thorough work presenting a mix of science and art. 

 

In our previous articles we had numerous chances to show you diverse UI animations solving users’ problems and enhancing usability, still they were mostly presented in design perspective. Today’s  case study will set the link between design and development for iOS mobile applications: it will show you collaboration of UI designers, motion designers and iOS developers working over animation for Toonie Alarm. Previous case studies already let you see the creative process for user interface and mascot design, but this time you will come along step-by-step guide on how animation was created for the app. 

 

Time Picker animation

 

Time picker in the alarm application is actually the core part of the interaction with the app and the primary element at which motion design and development play the vital role in establishing both usability and visual harmony. Let’s see how science, calculations and code are able to transform into beauty and style.

 

toonie alarm UI animation

 

All the content of animation is placed on custom subclass UIView, for this case we call it AnimatedDayView.

 

layers_scheme toonie-ui-animation

 

The bottom layer is Infinite UIScrollView (1 on the scheme above). It is the endless scroll view that includes the copies of the image below.

 

toonie scroll animation

 

There are numerous ways of realization for endless scroll. The main idea of replacement in scroll view is to recalculate the size of the scroll view and replace the invisible previous image showing the new one and adding the one for the future.

 

In the case of animated time picker for Toonie, we took the starting point as 6 AM, therefore the middle point is 6 PM and the ending point is 6 AM of the next day.

 

The next layer is Stars UIImageView (2). This UIImageView is added over the scroll view and goes around its center; during this process, the Alpha of the layer is changed. It means that in the daytime it is transparent while in the evening time it gradually appears.

 

stars_ui-view_scroll_animation

 

The next layer is CALayer for the sun and the moon— SunMoonBackgroundLayer. It isn’t seen in the scheme as it has the same size as AnimatedDayView. It also rotates around its center which is below the visible frame of the screen (5).

 

On the SunMoonBackgroundLayer, there are two more layers — for the moon (3) and the sun (4). The layer of the moon rotates to the same angle as SunMoonBackgroundLayer but in the opposite direction. The sun rotates to the higher number of radians.

 

The issue of great importance here was to thoroughly calculate at which number of degrees should each layer be rotated and how far should the scroll go on. The scroll presents the easiest part. The input variable is always time, that is the hour and minutes which user chose on UIDatePicker. With this data, it’s quite simple to calculate the scroll view shifting. Initially, it will be zero, which in our case is equal to the time of 6 AM as we set above. Imagine that user has picked the time 9.10 AM. We can understand which number of pixel the view has to shift down or up when we calculate the difference of the time in minutes (190 minutes) and transforming them into pixels. All the scroll ground presents 24 hours, so its height presents 24 hours, therefore 1 minute=image_height/minutes_per_day (60*24). Knowing the value of 1 minute, it’s not difficult to calculate how many pixels are set into 190 minutes. The only thing left to do is to move the scroll on the required number of pixels, which can be also negative in cases when the new time is less than the previous setting.

 

The next important parameter is Alpha of the stars. It can be calculated with understanding at which particular place on the background image we are at the current position. It means that at 6 AM in the top part of the image the stars should have Alpha 0 value because the morning starts. And the stars are ignored, aka kept in Alpha 0, up to 6 PM, and then Alpha value should be gradually increased so that at midnight Alpha reached 1. The calculation of dynamics and intensity here can be different depending on the desired visual effect. The core thing is that we have the basic parameter which we can rely on: the current position on the background image. And it can be easily calculated knowing the time set by the user. With alteration of Alpha motion, attractive visual performance can be effectively reached.

 

To calculate the angle of rotation, we take 360 degrees for 24 hours. So, 0 degree = 6 AM. We calculate the difference in minutes, find the number of degrees per minute and set the degrees required for shifting.

 

Another element of animation is clouds. They appear due to NSTimer. It adds one of the graphic variants for clouds (the app uses three graphic versions) with random coordinate of Alpha (transparency) beyond the limits of the screen on the right side. After that animation of movement (changing the center) starts from right to left. The timer is launched with the random interval.  After the animation is finished, the cloud is gone.

 

toonie alarm time picker

 

Sun switch

 

Another piece of animation that required attention and creativity was the switch on the Alarm Screen, the actual element of interaction showing that the alarm is set and active or not. Design solution supporting general visual performance of the app was to make the toggle look like the animated sun when alarm was in the active position.

 

toonie switch UI animation

 

Looking over the accomplishment of the presented motion via code, we see that this is the UIView which contains several layers.

 

toonie-ui-switch_animation

 

The first layer is the background of the hole in the switch (1) which has a rectangular shape. Above it, there is the circle — the toggle of the switch (2) which is the center of the sun. It can move leftwards or rightwards. Another layer is the sun rays (3). They are set as the separate layer because they have the endless animation of rotation.

 

When the switch is off, the rays change their Alpha to 0 and animation stops. Over all the mentioned layers, the largest layer is placed which is the background of the switch (4). This is also the rectangular layer which has a mask CAShapeLayer drawn with two UIBezierPaths.

 

 

The mask cuts off the layer of the required shape and switch gets a look of the final view. For interactive controlling, two Gesture Recognizers are added: UITapGestureRecognizer for pushing and UIPanGestureRecognized for pulling the toggle.

 

This practical case shows that making animation which will realize its problem-solving potential looking attractive and natural is a demanding task requiring thoughtful approach and collaboration of designers and developers for users’ sake. If you want to test everything described above in real interaction, just set Toonie and see how it works. And don’t miss new cases telling more stories of creative process.


Welcome to set up Toonie Alarm via App Store

Welcome to read case studies about user interface design and mascot design for Toonie Alarm

Welcome to see the designs by Tubik Studio on Dribbble and Behance

Book tubik design inspiration

20 TED-talks for Designers. Inspiration Full of Thoughts.

In creative jobs, design in particular, inspiration is one of the keys to productivity. Perhaps, one of the most productive kinds of inspiration is the one taken from experts, successful people who have experienced what they share. Today we’re going to recommend you a set of interesting and informative TED-talks that we think could be interesting, useful and helpful for designers as well as other creative people! Should be said, TED is a great resource of wise and informative things to learn in diverse directions and spheres, so we never miss the chance to share our findings there.

 

Here we offer you 20 TED-talks all with the descriptions given on the TED website. Most of them are already classic, sometimes even could be called legendary, and that makes them even more precious as they have been successfully checked with the time and practice. The ability to analyze take the best from the past usually broadens the creative horizons and becomes a solid foundation from innovative thinking. We also added some prominent thoughts full of wisdom and practical experience. So, let’s move on!

 

Don Norman: 3 ways good design makes you happy

 

In this talk from 2003, design critic Don Norman turns his incisive eye toward beauty, fun, pleasure and emotion, as he looks at design that makes people happy. He names the three emotional cues that a well-designed product must hit to succeed.

 

 

Some thoughts to remember:

 

The middle level of processing is the behavioral level and that’s actually where most of our stuff gets done. Visceral is subconscious, you’re unaware of it. Behavioral is subconscious, you’re unaware of it.Almost everything we do is subconscious. I’m walking around the stage — I’m not attending to the control of my legs. I’m doing a lot; most of my talk is subconscious; it has been rehearsed and thought about a lot. Most of what we do is subconscious. Automatic behavior — skilled behavior — is subconscious, controlled by the behavioral side. And behavioral design is all about feeling in control,which includes usability, understanding — but also the feel and heft.

 

Emotion is all about acting; emotion is really about acting. It’s being safe in the world. Cognition is about understanding the world, emotion is about interpreting it — saying good, bad, safe, dangerous, and getting us ready to act, which is why the muscles tense or relax. And that’s why we can tell the emotion of somebody else — because their muscles are acting, subconsciously, except that we’ve evolved to make the facial muscles really rich with emotion.

 

 

James Patten: The best computer interface? Maybe … your hands

 

“The computer is an incredibly powerful means of creative expression,” says designer and TED Fellow James Patten. But right now, we interact with computers, mainly, by typing and tapping. In this nifty talk and demo, Patten imagines a more visceral, physical way to bring your thoughts and ideas to life in the digital world, taking the computer interface off the screen and putting it into your hands.

 

 

Some thoughts to remember:

 

And when you think about it, this makes a lot of sense, that using specialized physical objects would help people use an interface more easily. I mean, our hands and our minds are optimized to think about and interact with tangible objects.

 

Margaret Gould Stewart: How giant websites design for you (and a billion others, too)

 

Facebook’s “like” and “share” buttons are seen 22 billion times a day, making them some of the most-viewed design elements ever created. Margaret Gould Stewart, Facebook’s director of product design, outlines three rules for design at such a massive scale — one so big that the tiniest of tweaks can cause global outrage, but also so large that the subtlest of improvements can positively impact the lives of many.

 

 

Some thoughts to remember:

 

Now, the first thing that you need to know about designing at scale is that the little things really matter.

 

The next thing that you need to understand as a principle is that when you introduce change, you need to do it extraordinarily carefully. Now I often have joked that I spend almost as much time designing the introduction of change as I do the change itself, and I’m sure that we can all relate to that when something that we use a lot changes and then we have to adjust. The fact is, people can become very efficient at using bad design, and so even if the change is good for them in the long run, it’s still incredibly frustrating when it happens, and this is particularly true with user-generated content platforms,because people can rightfully claim a sense of ownership. It is, after all, their content.

 

Matthew Carter: My life in typefaces

 

Pick up a book, magazine or screen, and more than likely you’ll come across some typography designed by Matthew Carter. In this charming talk, the man behind typefaces such as Verdana, Georgia and Bell Centennial (designed just for phone books — remember them?), takes us on a spin through a career focused on the very last pixel of each letter of a font.

 

 

Some thoughts to remember:

 

You know, at times of technical innovation, designers want to be influenced by what’s in the air. We want to respond. We want to be pushed into exploring something new.

 

Aris Venetikidis: Making sense of maps

 

Map designer Aris Venetikidis is fascinated by the maps we draw in our minds as we move around a city — less like street maps, more like schematics or wiring diagrams, abstract images of relationships between places. How can we learn from these mental maps to make better real ones? As a test case, he remakes the notorious Dublin bus map. (Filmed at TEDxDublin)

 

 

Some thoughts to remember:

 

So for a successful public transport map, we should not stick to accurate representation, but design them in the way our brains work.

 

Stefan Sagmeister: Happiness by Design

 

Graphic designer Stefan Sagmeister takes the audience on a whimsical journey through moments of his life that made him happy — and notes how many of these moments have to do with good design.

 

 

Some thoughts to remember:

You know, one is: just working without pressure. Then: working concentrated, without being frazzled. Or, as Nancy said before, like really immerse oneself into it. Try not to get stuck doing the same thing — or try not get stuck behind the computer all day. This is, you know, related to it: getting out of the studio. Then, of course, trying to, you know, work on things where the content is actually important for me. And being able to enjoy the end results.

 

Tony Fadell: The first secret of design is… noticing

 

As human beings, we get used to «the way things are» really fast. But for designers, the way things are is an opportunity … Could things be better? How? In this funny, breezy talk, the man behind the iPod and the Nest thermostat shares some of his tips for noticing — and driving — change.

 

 

Some thoughts to remember:

 

Why do we get used to everyday things? Well as human beings, we have limited brain power. And so our brains encode the everyday things we do into habits so we can free up space to learn new things. It’s a process called habituation and it’s one of the most basic ways, as humans, we learn.

 

My first tip is to look broader. You see, when you’re tackling a problem, sometimes, there are a lot of steps that lead up to that problem. And sometimes, a lot of steps after it. If you can take a step back and look broader, maybe you can change some of those boxes before the problem. Maybe you can combine them. Maybe you can remove them altogether to make that better.

 

Our challenge is to wake up each day and say, «How can I experience the world better?»

 

Chris Urmson: How a driverless car sees the road

 

Statistically, the least reliable part of the car is … the driver. Chris Urmson heads up Google’s driverless car program, one of several efforts to remove humans from the driver’s seat. He talks about where his program is right now, and shares fascinating footage that shows how the car sees the road and makes autonomous decisions about what to do next.

 

 

Some thoughts to remember:

 

The better the technology gets, the less reliable the driver is going to get.So by just making the cars incrementally smarter, we’re probably not going to see the wins we really need.

 

…it’s not to say that the driver assistance systems aren’t going to be incredibly valuable. They can save a lot of lives in the interim, but to see the transformative opportunity to help someone like Steve get around, to really get to the end case in safety, to have the opportunity to change our cities and move parking out and get rid of these urban craters we call parking lots, it’s the only way to go.

 

David Carson: Design and discovery

 

Great design is a never-ending journey of discovery — for which it helps to pack a healthy sense of humor. Sociologist and surfer-turned-designer David Carson walks through a gorgeous (and often quite funny) slide deck of his work and found images.

 

 

Some thoughts to remember:

 

I’m a big believer in the emotion of design, and the message that’s sent before somebody begins to read,before they get the rest of the information; what is the emotional response they get to the product, to the story, to the painting — whatever it is.

 

Why not experiment? Why not have some fun? Why not put some of yourself into the work? And when I was teaching, I used to always ask the students, What’s the definition of a good job? And as teachers, after you get all the answers, you like to give them the correct answer. And the best one I’ve heard — I’m sure some of you have heard this —the definition of a good job is: If you could afford to — if money wasn’t an issue — would you be doing that same work? And if you would, you’ve got a great job. And if you wouldn’t, what the heck are you doing? You’re going to be dead a really long time.

 

Philippe Starck: Design and destiny

 

Designer Philippe Starck — with no pretty slides to show — spends 18 minutes reaching for the very roots of the question «Why design?» Listen carefully for one perfect mantra for all of us, genius or not.

 

 

Some thoughts to remember:

 

And here is something: nobody is obliged to be a genius, but everybody is obliged to participate.

 

With billions of people who have been born, worked, lived and died before us, these people who have worked so much, we have now bring beautiful things, beautiful gifts, we know so many things. We can say to our children, OK, done, that was our story. That passed.Now you have a duty: invent a new story. Invent a new poetry. The only rule is, we have not to have any idea about the next story. We give you white pages. Invent. We give you the best tools, the best tools, and now, do it.

 

David Kelley: Human-centered design

 

IDEO’s David Kelley says that product design has become much less about the hardware and more about the user experience. He shows video of this new, broader approach, including footage from the Prada store in New York.

 

 

Some thoughts to remember:

 

…it’s really exciting that we’re taking a more human-centered approach to design, that we’re including behaviors and personalities in the things we do, and I think this is great. Designers are more trusted and more integrated into the business strategy of companies

 

Linda Hill: How to manage for collective creativity

 

What’s the secret to unlocking the creativity hidden inside your daily work, and giving every great idea a chance? Harvard professor Linda Hill, co-author of «Collective Genius,» has studied some of the world’s most creative companies to come up with a set of tools and tactics to keep great ideas flowing — from everyone in the company, not just the designated «creatives.»

 

 

Some thoughts to remember:

 

Leading innovation is not about creating a vision, and inspiring others to execute it. But what do we mean by innovation? An innovation is anything that is both new and useful. It can be a product or service. It can be a process or a way of organizing. It can be incremental, or it can be breakthrough. We have a pretty inclusive definition.

 

Innovation is not about solo genius, it’s about collective genius.

 

What we know is, at the heart of innovation is a paradox. You have to unleash the talents and passions of many people and you have to harness them into a work that is actually useful. Innovation is a journey. It’s a type of collaborative problem solving, usually among people who have different expertise and different points of view.

 

Ken Robinson: Do schools kill creativity?

 

Sir Ken Robinson makes an entertaining and profoundly moving case for creating an education system that nurtures (rather than undermines) creativity.

 

 

Some thoughts to remember:

 

I don’t mean to say that being wrong is the same thing as being creative. What we do know is, if you’re not prepared to be wrong, you’ll never come up with anything original — if you’re not prepared to be wrong. And by the time they get to be adults, most kids have lost that capacity. They have become frightened of being wrong. And we run our companies like this. We stigmatize mistakes. And we’re now running national education systems where mistakes are the worst thing you can make. And the result is that we are educating people out of their creative capacities.

 

We know three things about intelligence. One, it’s diverse. We think about the world in all the ways that we experience it. We think visually, we think in sound, we think kinesthetically. We think in abstract terms, we think in movement. Secondly, intelligence is dynamic. If you look at the interactions of a human brain,as we heard yesterday from a number of presentations, intelligence is wonderfully interactive. The brain isn’t divided into compartments. In fact, creativity — which I define as the process of having original ideas that have value — more often than not comes about through the interaction of different disciplinary ways of seeing things.

 

Young-ha Kim: Be an artist, right now!

 

Why do we ever stop playing and creating? With charm and humor, celebrated Korean author Young-ha Kim invokes the world’s greatest artists to urge you to unleash your inner child — the artist who wanted to play forever. (Filmed at TEDxSeoul.)

 

 

Some thoughts to remember:

 

We don’t know why we should be artists, but we have many reasons why we can’t be. Why do people instantly resist the idea of associating themselves with art? Perhaps you think art is for the greatly gifted or for the thoroughly and professionally trained. And some of you may think you’ve strayed too far from art. Well you might have, but I don’t think so. This is the theme of my talk today. We are all born artists.

 

David McCandless: The beauty of data visualization

 

David McCandless turns complex data sets (like worldwide military spending, media buzz, Facebook status updates) into beautiful, simple diagrams that tease out unseen patterns and connections. Good design, he suggests, is the best way to navigate information glut — and it may just change the way we see the world.

 

 

Some thoughts to remember:

 

The eye is exquisitely sensitive to patterns in variations in color, shape and pattern. It loves them, and it calls them beautiful. It’s the language of the eye. If you combine the language of the eye with the language of the mind, which is about words and numbers and concepts, you start speaking two languages simultaneously, each enhancing the other. So, you have the eye, and then you drop in the concepts. And that whole thing — it’s two languages both working at the same time.

 

Aaron Koblin: Visualizing ourselves … with crowd-sourced data

 

Artist Aaron Koblin takes vast amounts of data — and at times vast numbers of people — and weaves them into stunning visualizations. From elegant lines tracing airline flights to landscapes of cell phone data, from a Johnny Cash video assembled from crowd-sourced drawings to the «Wilderness Downtown» video that customizes for the user, his works brilliantly explore how modern technology can make us more human.

 

 

Some thoughts to remember:

 

Our lives are being driven by data, and the presentation of that data is an opportunity for us to make some amazing interfaces that tell great stories.

 

…an interface can be a powerful narrative device. And as we collect more and more personally and socially relevant data, we have an opportunity, and maybe even an obligation, to maintain the humanity and tell some amazing stories as we explore and collaborate together.

 

Golan Levin: Art that looks back at you

 

Golan Levin, an artist and engineer, uses modern tools — robotics, new software, cognitive research — to make artworks that surprise and delight. Watch as sounds become shapes, bodies create paintings, and a curious eye looks back at the curious viewer.

 

 

Some thoughts to remember:

 

I’m an artist, and I’m really interested in expanding the vocabulary of human action, and basically empowering people through interactivity. I want people to discover themselves as actors, as creative actors, by having interactive experiences.

 

Milton Glaser: Using design to make ideas new

 

From the TED archives: The legendary graphic designer Milton Glaser dives deep into a new painting inspired by Piero della Francesca. From here, he muses on what makes a convincing poster, by breaking down an idea and making it new.

 

 

Some thoughts to remember:

 

Sometimes, in the middle of a resistant problem, I write down things that I know about it. But you can see the beginning of an idea there, because you can see the word «new» emerging from the «old.» That’s what happens. There’s a relationship between the old and the new; the new emerges from the context of the old.

 

Tim Brown: Designers — think big!

 

Tim Brown says the design profession has a bigger role to play than just creating nifty, fashionable little objects. He calls for a shift to local, collaborative, participatory «design thinking» — starting with the example of 19th-century design thinker Isambard Kingdom Brunel.

 

 

Some thoughts to remember:

 

Systems thinkers who were reinventing the world, to a priesthood of folks in black turtlenecks and designer glasses working on small things. As our industrial society matured, so design became a profession and it focused on an ever smaller canvas until it came to stand for aesthetics, image and fashion.

 

So if human need is the place to start, then design thinking rapidly moves on to learning by making. Instead of thinking about what to build, building in order to think. Now, prototypes speed up the process of innovation, because it is only when we put our ideas out into the world that we really start to understand their strengths and weaknesses. And the faster we do that, the faster our ideas evolve.

 

Richard Seymour: How beauty feels

 

A story, a work of art, a face, a designed object — how do we tell that something is beautiful? And why does it matter so much to us? Designer Richard Seymour explores our response to beauty and the surprising power of objects that exhibit it.

 

 

Some thoughts to remember:

 

Form is function. It informs, it tells us, it supplies us answers before we’ve even thought about it. And so I’ve stopped using words like «form,» and I’ve stopped using words like «function» as a designer. What I try to pursue now is the emotional functionality of things. Because if I can get that right, I can make them wonderful, and I can make them repeatedly wonderful.


 

As we can see, the set of speeches is quite diverse: some of them are giving the examples of designs, some unveil the life and routine case of famous experts, some bring general ideas on creativity and design process aspects. Anyway, they enrich us with the ideas which bring us closer to the user, to creating efficient design and taking everything possible from our natural creativity.

tubik studio icons design

Basic Grammar for Designers: Must and Mustn’t in Design

There are a lot of tips what designers can do and what they should avoid doing to become successful. Most of them are reasoned and really helpful, especially for beginners in the sphere. And today we have decided to enlarge this great global collection with our set of thoughts, which are separated along basic modal verbs of English — “must” and “mustn’t”. All the points mentioned below are taken from our studio experience and we have had a really great lesson of basic English grammar, discussing all those positions together.

So, let’s get started!

 

Designers must:

 

  • Learn constantly

 

There is no point on the way where being a designer you can stop learning. Sure, if you work on several projects at the same time, it’s hard to find the time for reading professional books or blogs. However, finding this time is vital for your success, otherwise, you risk losing the essence and fundamentals.

monday post

 

  • Follow the trends

 

There are loads of ways how to keep yourself up to date with the latest and freshest trends. Following blogs and social accounts of well-known and prospective design studios, exploring established design platforms like Dribbble and Behance, watching speeches by famous designers and presentations of new products in the field, communicating with other designers at various events — all of these steps can be extremely helpful in keeping your professional horizons as broad as possible.

tubik studio designers 1

 

  • Try new tools

 

It doesn’t mean that all the professional tools, soft and applications you are going to try will be useful and helpful. Moreover, it doesn’t mean that they are going to be better than the earlier ones. However, in most cases, they will provide something new enabling you to obtain new solutions, to save your time, to create new features. The more tools you try, the higher is the chance to find those which are perfect for you and your project needs.

tubik studio work

 

  • Communicate with colleagues

 

Communication with colleagues can be both real and virtual. In both cases, it matters for your professional recognition. Don’t forget that design, as well as business, is always done by people. Socializing with colleagues can end up being involved in interesting projects, recommended to potential customers or invited to speak in front of other designers. The basic aim of communication is the exchange of information and this information can be strategic for your professional growth.

brainstorm session Tubik studio

 

  • Present and share

 

As we have already mentioned in our tips for beginning designers, sharing and presentation is the way to get not only recognition but also feedback which opens new vision of your own work. It is a well-known fact that being objective and fair about your own project is quite hard, so presentation and discussion of your work with others can be very helpful. Moreover, sharing your designs at design platforms like Dribbble and Behance, your thoughts in blogs and your professional life and routine in social accounts attract your potential customers and brings home the bacon.

tubik studio case study

 

  • Use technologies they design for

 

Designer should know what is the path of a user when he uses this or that technology. When you design the application not knowing how to use a smartphone and how it differs from using a tablet, the chances to create a viable product are really low. Updating the soft and operation system of your devices plays the same important role. Creating something for users, you should be a user yourself.

tubik studio designer 1

 

  • Use social networks

 

This point combines several aims mentioned above. Using social networks not just for private, but in professional aspect gives you three important benefits: you understand how it works from user’s view and can apply this knowledge in your job; you can get a lot of information on how other designers work and communicate with them in fast and unobtrusive way; and you can present yourself and your professional abilities on the established and promoted platform with great number of users.

 

  • Keep themselves fit and healthy

 

This actually doesn’t look like a professional tip. However, your health and fitness is the basis of your success. Putting it aside, to ‘better times’, you risk losing your ability to work and that is the thing to be remembered, always. Give your eyes the break, walk around, stretch your back muscles, eat clean and find your own enjoyable way to exercise, let it be swimming, running or anything else. It may sound «out-of-business», but your business totally depends on it.

 

  • Listen to their customers

 

If you want to make design business giving you money, you should study how to satisfy customer’s needs and sell your service. So, always listen to your customer, and ask loads of questions if needed. Get into details, feel their pain, understand their targets — and they will later give you not only money, but also promotion, which is even more important.

tubik studio design1

 

  • Test as much as possible

 

Experts in usability say that it’s impossible to be fully objective about the project you work on, especially if it’s long-term. Moreover, you are not a magician turning into anyone who will use your product to understand the best way of doing anything. Therefore, creating the idea is hot enough. You should test it to grab the real practical data and improve your product.

tubik studio designer

 

  • Present themselves as personalities

 

Presenting your professional achievements in global design community is significant on the way to recognition. But if you want to make the process even more efficient, give your work the personality. Let people know, who you are, show them how you work, share your opinions, instagram some routine. Support your skills with your personality to make them both more powerful.

 

  • Organize their day

 

If you want to make design your business rather than your hobby, organization and time-management are vital. Otherwise, you will not be able to provide the customer with the efficient workflow and get lost in tasks. Set the regime, split the tasks into smaller steps with their own due-dates and don’t neglect the to-do lists. It can make you surprised with the amount of job you are able to do when your day is properly organized.

tubik studio design

 

Designers mustn’t

 

  • Look down at their customers

 

Sure, in most cases you know more or the hell much more than your customer. However, it doesn’t make you the enlighten and doesn’t give you rights to be rude and arrogant. Your task is to understand and help rather than to humiliate and self-express.

 

  • Stop learning

 

The day you think that you are the super expert and there is nothing new for you anymore is the halfway to the death of your designer career. Self-education should never stop, especially in such dynamic field as web and app design.

 

  • Ignore users’ needs

 

Designer should always remember that in most cases neither they nor their customers are the deciding voice. The users of the final product are. Therefore, ignoring their needs is going to give a product which may be awesome and highly artistic but absolutely non-viable.

 

  • Say direct “no” to customer

 

Certainly, that doesn’t mean that the customer is always right. If all the customers knew how to create their designs, they would do it themselves and designers would get extinct. But in our world and our days, your customers are people who are asking your help and what is really important they do it not for free. So, when you do not agree with the customer’s solution or you see the better ways of solving the problem, get into the issue, ask about all the details of this wish and then offer your vision in solid but polite way, reasoning every step of your solution to the problem.

 

  • Avoid communication

 

Communication is used here globally. Obviously, when you are deep into the particular project and, let’s say, work out the complex screens, you won’t be happy to get distracted just to feel that feeling of communication. Communication here means to be ready to brainstorm, to delegate the parts of the tasks in wise and open way when it’s needed for the team or project sake. Also, it happens that designers avoid communication with customers preferring just to get the task and accomplish it how they see it right. This way can lead the designer of spending a long time accomplishing the project which is absolutely different from what the customer wants and then cause long and hard hours of frustration while redesigning.

 

  • Start the project without research

 

Starting the project without preliminary research can also cost you wasted time and effort. Without investigation and exploration you will not be aware of the situation on the market, needs, and wishes of your target audience, strong and weak sides of the competition, so the risk to create something not original or not appropriate is much higher.

 

  • Forget about coding and development

 

One more thing to bear in mind is that the product designer creates is going to be coded on the next stage. Sure, most designers want to see their products alive, working, and presenting their bright skills, and if you are one of them give out the result which will be not only visual but also supported with the materials, helping developers to breathe the life into it.

 

  • Ignore competition

 

The ever-time truth of martial art is that to be prepared you should know your enemy by sight. Certainly, design is not the war field, but this law still works. And the most important benefit of exploring the competition is not to reveal or define the enemies, but to understand what is already going on in the market and analyze how to make your product stand out from the crowd of the like.

 

  • Forget about deadlines

 

If design is your hobby or you do it just for pure art, you can ignore any kind of deadlines and time restrictions. But if you want to make design your business, you should be ready to stick to deadlines and study how to manage your time. Otherwise, you risk losing the projects and perspectives just because of breaking deadlines.

 

  • Wait for the muse

 

Creative people often say that they cannot work without necessary inspiration. They are just waiting for the muse which will help them to find the best solution. Like it or hate it, but muse which doesn’t arrive on time is not the reasonable explanation of broken deadlines or inappropriate result. Therefore, if you want to have the serious name and get respected by the clients, if you want to have a constant flow of projects and earn more and more, find the ways to call your muse when you need it, not waiting when it wants to come. By the way, the process of research and sketching for the project is one of the great ways. Appetite comes with eating, muse comes with working.


Welcome to see the designs by Tubik Studio on Dribbble and Behance

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Tubik Studio in Personalities: Sergey Valiukh.

People ask the difference between a leader and a boss. The leader leads, and the boss drives. (Theodore Roosevelt)

 

Our studio nowadays is a full-fledged team of diverse designers, always full of inspiration and ready to solve the problem of any depth and height. And, you know, we have met and got together due to the person who one day took a risk to start this venture.

 

Valiukh

 

Sergey Valiukh — a founder, CEO and art director of Tubik Studio — is a professional artist, designer and architect, who has devoted his talent and inspiration to web/UI/UX design these days. Being a restless creator, he hasn’t chosen the way of individual path, but made possible for other talented guys to get together and create a friendly and collaborative team. And he is actually the center of this little world with high ambitions.

 

Tubik Studio designer

Working out a new project

 

Tubik Studio designers

Small brainstorm session at Tubik Studio

 

Being asked why among all the directions of art he has chosen the sphere of UX/UI and Responsive web design, he says this is the field which gives limitless opportunities to both creators and customers. To tell more, it’s vital for him to feel that he works for people and thinking about people.

 

tubik Studio Sergey Valiukh

Sergey Valiukh as a speaker at the conference «Anatomy of Design»: among the colleagues

 

Sergey Valiukh Tubik

Hosting Behance Portfolio Review Dnipropetrovsk: Sergey Valiukh with other speakers of the event

 

Sergey Valiukh Tubik

Sergey Valiukh as a speaker at Behance Portfolio Review Dnipropetrovsk

 

In Ukraine, where Tubik Studio is based, there are no many places where you can study to become a UI/UX designer. Although, starting from nowhere about two years ago, nowadays Sergey is certain that the only thing you need to become a professional in this field is desire and ability to work hard. On the one hand, he says, it’s much easier now than a decade or even five years ago considering that today there’s a huge number of resources such as e-books and sites, guides and manuals, social networks and professional platforms giving a designer the successful start. On the other hand, it’s complicated and hard as well as any other job, which is creative, full of responsibilities, interactive and developing in a highly competitive sphere. You should have no illusions; you should just work, study and improve yourself all the time.

 

Sergey Valiukh Tubik

Always keen to get updated

 

He doesn’t remember himself not drawing, sketching, painting — creating images of all kinds and sizes. Today as well, he starts the work on any project with a pencil in his hand. Although technologies are totally fantastic today, providing a designer with plenty of tools and software, creating a concept, he prefers to work out the idea by hand and soul and only then make it powerful with technologies. Moreover, being asked to give the advice for beginners in the field of Web/UI/UX design, he says that the old school shouldn’t be neglected: if you improve your skills of drawing and painting by hand, no doubt, that is going to help you in digital art.

 

Sketches by Sergey Valiukh

The set of sketches by Sergey Valiukh

 

He started as a freelance designer with no definite experience and clear vision of the job. He studied works and techniques of web-designers from all over the world, was open to improve, practise every single day and not to be afraid to perform the results of that practice on Dribbble and Behance to get feedback from other designers.

 

Gif station Valiukh

Animated screen for the Boat station app

 

gif_resto_app_dribbble_800x600

Animated screen for the Restaurant app

 

Animation Sergey Valiukh

Animated screen for mobile application

 

Now he has resounded in UI/UX design, and also has become the head of Tubik Studio uniting creative and stylish designers. Everybody knowing Sergey realizes that nothing of this was awarded or granted to him. It is just a result of hard work and positive thinking.

 

weather_app_800x600

Weather application screen concept

 

Dribbble shot

The concept of landscape and portrait view switching for iPad

 

The studio led by him is a fascinating place to work. We are very serious and thorough when it comes to work. Everybody here is always ready to help, we criticize each other’s work positively and constructively, share experience, so together we create a single mechanism for producing great final product. However, at the same time we are always ready to have fun together, to support each other and spend great time out of the studio. Being friends gives us a great chance to feel work like home. The experience of successful companies persuades: the more comfortable you feel at work, the more productively you go through all the stages of your job. And, you know, we feel it every day being inspired by the heart and soul of our team.

 

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Tubik Studio hosting Behance Portfolio Review Dnipropetrovsk

 


Welcome to see the works by Tubik Studio on Dribbble and Behance

5_Stereotypes_on_Design

5 Stereotypes about Design: Myths and Reality.

It’s never a secret that all the occupations are more or less surrounded with some stereotypes and common thoughts on both a job and a professional. None of the jobs in the sphere of web and app design can avoid this stuff, so let’s look into some stereotypes about designers and try to justify or disprove them with our own experience.

 

Stereotype 1. Designers are usually messy and untidy (as well as other creative guys).

 

There are decades or even centuries of thoughts that real creators are people never bothering about housework or other chores. They are believed to be out-of-earth, flying in their dreams and projects far from wasting time on putting things in their places. And for some people of the trade it can be true, but, being honest, most of them are rather far from success and fame.

 

Successful designers are always busy. Having their hands full, they have to be productive. That means they can never allow themselves to be untidy and messy because that is the death knell of their productivity. Design needs not only creativity but also deep concentration and thorough focus. Getting distracted from the process to find something as decent as a pencil not returned at its place will slow down the designer noticeably. When it happens several times a day or (no way!) an hour, you can forget about speed. Speed and efficiency mean more work, more customers and that is more money. Time is money, no joke. So why lose it in mess?

 

tubik designer work place

Tubik Studio CEO  Sergey Valiukh working on the project: nothing distracting, pure concentration.

 

The same should be said about the mess in a computer brain. Working with any project, a designer has to accomplish tons of updates. And if you are good at your craft, you are going to have several projects at the same time. That means that you HAVE to be organized and teach yourself to keep everything in order. Otherwise, one day you’ll get stuck in loads of files, subfiles and “the-newest-very-final” files on your desktop. In this case, deadlines are literally going to become dead.

 

Experienced designers often say that even your desk should be as tidy as possible because nothing should distract you breaking your concentration. Cluttered desk means cluttered head for many people. Think about it organizing your working space.

tubik-studio-design for business

 

Tip: Want to be productive? Keep mess as far from your desk, computer, and brain as possible.

 

Stereotype 2. Customer is always right

 

This thought is typical not only for the sphere of web and app design but for any field where you create or sell products for customers. Although, in the area of web and app design (maybe more often than in others) this rule doesn’t work in every case and context. This happens because the customers mostly see the product from their own perspective, with the target of profit or conversions as the priority. It is natural that customers will think about their own benefits. But, keep in mind, the customer is mostly not the final user of the product. And the aim of a designer is to view the task from the perspective of future users, otherwise, the customer’s priority will be failed.

 

So, it is very important to work in tight collaboration and always remember: your customer doesn’t have to know all the nuances and peculiarities of the design process. That is why THEY are customers and YOU are a designer. Be attentive and sensitive to everything that your customers want, but don’t let it go beyond the limits of reasonability and sensibility.

 

Don’t be too soft but at the same time don’t be too hard. If you are too gentle or just indifferent, if you only follow your customer’s wishes not analyzing whether they are potentially efficient, you risk not creating a good working product which will make your name and bring you more customers. If you are too hard, your customer will feel you are too intrusive and bossy, so not respectful enough to your client — and you risk not only losing this particular project but also getting notorious through word-of-mouth references from customers. Therefore, it is vital to find the happy medium.

 

tubikstudio designers

Regular brainstorming session at the studio

 

Moreover, the thing, which has been practically checked by studio designers, is the idea that communicating with your customer you should get not only his wishes but also try to get the ideas and reasons of these wishes. If you understand why your customer wants to see particular colors, shapes or transitions, it will be easier for you (if necessary) to justify other methods of realization of these ideas which would give the result desired by the customer.

 

As a piece of a practical example, we have written about the process of collaboration with designers in the case study for Ribbet logo.

 

Tip: Be attentive to your customer. Be honest with your customer. Be helpful to your customer.

Never say: I am a designer, I know how to do it better — that is not the explanation of anything even if it’s one thousand percent true.

Never say: I am just a designer, I will do anything you want (and that is not my problem if your ideas and wishes do not work).

Justify, explain and keep your head high.

Your customers MAY be not right, but they HAVE to be satisfied and that is YOUR job.

 

Stereotype 3. Designer needs to work alone for the highest productivity

 

Again, the first note to make should be “It is highly individual”. There are the people in any creative job who are absolutely unable to work in a team and give the best result when they are not disturbed by other people. However, on the basis of practice, teamwork is a great way for productivity in the sphere of design.

 

Sure, it is much simpler just to get several designers sitting together in the same room, staring at their own computer screens and not talking to each other for ages. They will be effective workers, but their effectiveness will be limited to the edges of their own desk, so the success of the company will be created by the number of individual separate energies. Well, why not?

 

Nevertheless, if you get them together as a united collective mind, it will be far more efficient. Believe us, we’ve checked. Working in the team doesn’t mean losing individual creativity or fame — vice versa, it up-sizes designers’ individual abilities and makes them working faster and more productively. Working in the team, you can gather your colleagues for a brainstorm session, you are always able to ask for advice or share the newest information and practical skills valuable for the whole team.

 

tubik studio

Tubik Studio design team: individual work always combined with tight collaboration and support

 

tubikstudio design office teamwork

tubik-studio-UI-designers

Sharing and discussion is the part of working routine

 

tubik studio brainstorm

Feeling the power of collective mind

 

Tip: You can work alone if you want, and it will never make you weak or inefficient. But work in the team of soul mates will make you even stronger and faster in your job.

 

Read more about benefits and responsibilities of teamwork and freelancing in design here 

 

Stereotype 4. The idea is a key

 

Talking about the nature of design process, there is a common thought among both designers and non-designers that the most essential and focal thing in any project is to invent (find, discover, work out) the idea. If you have a brilliant idea — you are halfway (or even closer) to success.

 

Practice shows that reality is very different. Your idea may seem absolutely brilliant for first five seconds, hours or days, and you can give yourself some time to be proud of your own geniality. However, then there will come the moment when you will have to consider your idea. And, for example, the simple research can reveal that there are several more geniuses around having come up with the same idea. That doesn’t make your one worse — it just shows that it is not unique and to make it original you will have to apply some more efforts. Moreover, your customer may not share your vision. There can appear awful difficulties in the practical realization of a new concept. So, the invention of the idea doesn’t automatically mean that it will bring the successful result.

 

Considering the specific features of web/app design job, there also can be the problem that amazing design of the interface, great animation or bright branding elements in practice can become a total failure from user’s perspective. If you don’t want it to happen, you should be ready to research, design, analyze, iterate and maybe even redesign. We have told about it in detail in our case study on designing UX/UI for Echo project.

Navigation Menu and Profile screens for Echo case study

UI Navigation menu and Profile screens v2 for Echo case study

Design and redesign of user interface for Echo project

 

tubikstudio designer illustration

weather app design UI

Hours of thoughtful work and iterations lie between the idea and the final presentation of the app

 

Therefore, the idea is a key, but you have to rotate it a hundred or even a thousand times with hard work so that you could open the door to success.

 

Tip: Don’t relax after creating the idea. It’s not the time to open a bottle of champagne and celebrate anything. Be ready that most effort is ahead.

Only hard work and its results will show if your idea was the right key to the right door.

 

Stereotype 5. Creating the concept is faster and easier than working it out

 

There are tons of legends about master artisans who need short seconds for creating immortal concepts for any idea or task. In practice, it is impossible to predict how much time a designer will need to create the concept — seconds, minutes, hours or even days.

 

Tubik Studio design

 

Tubik Studio icons set

Design of the concept and working out the details is not really a piece of cake: working on a set of romantic icons

 

Given to unbelievably high speed of design development, creating efficient, practical, original and unique concept for a project in the sphere of web/app design often demands long process of thorough research of competitors, attempts and working out loads of variants before there will be found the one which will satisfy all the sides of the process: the designer, the customer and the user. And when the concept has already been worked out and agreed upon, the process becomes more technical, logical and predictable, so it is easier to calculate timing.

 

Therefore, sometimes creating the concept is easy and fast, but in other cases, it is much harder and demanding assignment to come up with the solution of the concept than technically realize it.

 

Tubik Studio designer

The designer and CFO of Tubik Studio Valentyn Khenkin working out a logo

 

Sketches for a landing page by Tubik Studio

First sketches for a landing page by Ludmila Shevchenko

 

Tip: Creating the concept, consider all the moments and details which will enable you to simplify and speed up the process of its efficient realization.

 

Read more tips from the studio team for the novice designers

 


Welcome to see designs by Tubik Studio on Dribbble and Behance