Tag Archives: design video

steve krug usability quotes and videos tubik blog

Don’t Make Me Think: 20 Thoughts on Usability by Steve Krug.

Design, as well as many other fields, is built upon the works and discoveries of the great professionals. Everyone who wants to be an expert in their craft often seeks for the guidance to learn how to do things right. Various books and articles written by gurus are now in a free access on the internet so those striving at knowledge can find the essential instruction without efforts.

 

We often share quotes and wise thoughts from the best experts in the digital design field in Tubik blog. You can find the short insight into Design Is a Job by Mike Monteiro, Designing for Emotion by Aarron Walter, as well as the set of wise thoughts from typography master Erik Spiekermann. Continuing Tubik Studio Quotes Collection, here’s a fresh set of quotes from the well-known book “Don’t Make Me Think” by Steve Krug.

 

The first edition was published in 2000 and then it was revisited in 2014 making it relevant and useful nowadays. Steve Krug sets some basic principles on the usability of interfaces and shares them with professionals working in this field which makes the book one of the top essential resources recommended for UX designers. “Don’t Make Me Think” describes the key points, examples and insights which are important to know about website usability. The major idea is to create designs with which users wouldn’t need to think too much how the interface works — this way it becomes not only problem-solving but also easy to use. Here are 20 quotes reflecting some key points from “Don’t Make Me Think”.

 

mobile interaction design tubik blog

 

If something requires a large investment of time—or looks like it will—it’s less likely to be used.

 

Making every page or screen self-evident is like having good lighting in a store: it just makes everything seem better.

 

design quotes Steve Krug 01

 

A lot of happy talk is the kind of self-congratulatory promotional writing that you find in badly written brochures. Unlike good promotional copy, it conveys no useful information, and it focuses on saying how great we are, as opposed to delineating what makes us great. Instruction must die.

 

Accessibility is the right thing to do. And not just the right thing; it’s profoundly the right thing to do, because the one argument for accessibility that doesn’t get made nearly often enough is how extraordinarily better it makes some people’s lives. How many opportunities do we have to dramatically improve people’s lives just by doing our job a little better?

 

Another needless source of question marks over people’s heads is links and buttons that aren’t obviously clickable. As a user, I should never have to devote a millisecond of thought to whether things are clickable—or not.

 

design quotes Steve Krug 02

 

In the last few years, making things more usable has become almost everybody’s responsibility. Visual designers and developers now often find themselves doing things like interaction design (deciding what happens next when the user clicks, taps, or swipes) and information architecture (figuring out how everything should be organized).

 

A person of average (or even below average) ability and experience can figure out how to use the thing to accomplish something without it being more trouble than it’s worth. Take my word for it: It’s really that simple.

 

Usability is about people and how they understand and use things, not about technology.

 

design quotes Steve Krug 03

 

The main thing you need to know about instructions is that no one is going to read them—at least not until after repeated attempts at “muddling through” have failed.

 

The more you watch users carefully and listen to them articulate their intentions, motivations, and thought processes, the more you realize that their individual reactions to Web pages are based on so many variables that attempts to describe users in terms of one-dimensional likes and dislikes are futile and counter-productive. Good design, on the other hand, takes this complexity into account.

 

The fact that the people who built the site didn’t care enough to make things obvious—and easy—can erode our confidence in the site and the organization behind it.

 

design quotes Steve Krug 05

 

In reality, though, most of the time we don’t choose the best option—we choose the first reasonable option, a strategy known as satisficing.

 

The problem is there are no simple “right” answers for most Web design questions (at least not for the important ones). What works is good, integrated design that fills a need—carefully thought out, well executed, and tested.

 

design quotes Steve Krug 07

 

Get rid of half the words on each page, then get rid of half of what’s left.

 

Designers love subtle cues, because subtlety is one of the traits of sophisticated design. But Web users are generally in such a hurry that they routinely miss subtle cues.

 

design quotes Steve Krug 06

 

If there’s one thing you learn by working on a lot of different Web sites, it’s that almost any design idea—no matter how appallingly bad—can be made usable in the right circumstances, with enough effort.

 

Your primary role should be to share what you know, not to tell people how things should be done.

 

design quotes Steve Krug 08

 

Your objective should always be to eliminate instructions entirely by making everything self-explanatory, or as close to it as possible. When instructions are absolutely necessary, cut them back to a bare minimum.

 

Faced with the prospect of following a convention, there’s a great temptation for designers to try reinventing the wheel instead, largely because they feel (not incorrectly) that they’ve been hired to do something new and different, not the same old thing. Not to mention the fact that praise from peers, awards, and high-profile job offers are rarely based on criteria like “best use of conventions.” Occasionally, time spent reinventing the wheel results in a revolutionary new rolling device. But usually it just amounts to time spent reinventing the wheel.

 

If you want a great site, you’ve got to test. After you’ve worked on a site for even a few weeks, you can’t see it freshly anymore. You know too much. The only way to find out if it really works is to test it.

 

design quotes Steve Krug 04

 

Bonus: Video Talks with Steve Krug

 

Do-It-Yourself Usability Testing with Steve Krug

 

 

Steve Krug Discusses Usability

 

 

Usability: Just One More Thing You Don’t Have Time For? Steve Krug at NextStep 2013

 


 

Welcome to check the quotes by Mike Monteiro from «Design Is a Job» and by Aarron Walter from «Designing for Emotion«

Welcome to check issues of Tubik Quotes Collection on brandingusabilityuser-centered design and content strategy

Welcome to read or download Tubik Magazine free books on logo designdesign for business and problem-solving web design

Erik Spiekermann Quotes Design

20 Wise Thoughts by Typography Master Erik Spiekermann

Good design is often based on a careful mix of tradition and innovation. And revolutionary inventions are solidly based on the findings by previous generations of professionals. So, whatever a domain of creative work you have chosen as your job, it’s important to sometimes stop and look back, listening to wise and experienced voices of people being in that job for years.

 

Earlier we have already shared numerous expert quotes, tips, video talks and books worth reviewing to support our readers with useful resources. In particular, you could check the insights into Design Is a Job by Mike Monteiro and  Designing for Emotion by Aarron Walter—the books belong to the series A Book Apart for designers offering the diversity of expert tips, case studies, and resources. Today continuing on this way, we are sharing a new set of quotes by Erik Spiekermann, a famous German typographer, designer and writer, an honorary professor at the University of the Arts Bremen and ArtCenter College of Design. Having passed the long way in graphic design from 1970s, being an author of books and articles as well as awards winner, he is justly recognized as a guru of typography and avidly shares his experience and expertise. So, here we will save a bunch of 20 useful expert tips for Tubik Quotes Collection — we got them from his blog, his interview for 99U and other published writings.  Join in and let’s look into his thoughts together to know a bit more about the master.

 

erik spiekermann photo

 

I’m very much a word person, so that’s why typography for me is the obvious extension. It just makes my words visible.

 

Inher­ent qual­ity is part of absolute qual­ity and with­out it things will appear shoddy. The users may not know why, but they always sense it.

 

These days, information is a commodity being sold. And designers—including the newly defined subset of information designers and information architects—have a responsible role to play. We are interpreters, not merely translators, between sender and receiver. What we say and how we say it makes a difference. If we want to speak to people, we need to know their language. In order to design for understanding, we need to understand design.

 

Erik Spiekermann Quotes Design 06

 

The materials shape your idea.

 

I learned that a brand isn’t a logo. There has to be implementation. You can design anything, but if the rubber doesn’t hit the road, you’ll be remembered as a great strategist but the client won’t call you again. You have to have a strategy, and you also have to be able to visualize it—one doesn’t go without the other.

 

Erik Spiekermann Quotes Design 05

The attention someone gives to what he or she makes is reflected in the end result, whether it is obvious or not.

 

I’ve always designed typefaces for specific solutions. In other words, a problem. Everything has always been done for a specific purpose. As a designer, you work for somebody else. That’s not negative. I work for a client, and I solve their problems. I bring my artistic vision to it, my creativity, whatever you want to call it. But essentially, I’m being paid to blow somebody else’s trumpet.

 

You are what you are seen to be.

 

Erik Spiekermann Quotes Design 04

 

The function has to be the brand. If it works well, it has to be branded at the same time.

 

If a design project is to be considered successful—and success is the true measure of quality—it must not only add an aesthetic dimension, but solve the problem at hand.

 

I mean, everyone puts their history into their work.

Erik Spiekermann Quotes Design 02

 

When I do typography, it’s 150 percent effort.

 

I know a lot of advertising agencies that thrive on overtime because they have a dozen interns who work for free and they spend their weekends doing free pitches. We don’t do free pitches because we don’t have any free time. Our time is valuable, and I’m not giving away ideas to some prospective client. That’s giving away the most valuable resource you have.

 

Work is gas. Work will fill any given volume.

Erik Spiekermann Quotes Design 03

 

 

Clients need to understand that they’ve hired us to do something they are not good at. And that they need to pay us for our knowledge, skills, experience and, yes: attitude.

 

 

My advice, now and always, is learn, learn, learn—starting right here.

 

Contrary to popular belief, designers are not artists. We employ artistic methods to visualize thinking and process, but, unlike artists, we work to solve a client’s problem, not present our own view of the world.

Erik Spiekermann Quotes Design 07

Being a designer is all about attitude. Sure, you have to know your craft, but as we both found out, you can pick most of that up over time if you’re prepared to listen, watch, and learn. Without the right attitude, however, you’ll always be a vendor to some people, a crazy artist to others.

 

So what’s new? The present generation of UI/UX designers may think that they invented a new way of designing, but we’ve had these issues forever. Trying to fit a lot of text onto the how-to page inside a pharmaceutical package is probably more difficult than doing the same on a screen. There’s no zoom on that paper, so it has to be really well done just for that one version and circumstance. My method? Think. Consider. Sketch. Think again. And look around you. It’s all been done before, albeit with different code.

 

Inspiration. From real life. I open my eyes and I travel and I look. And I read everything.

 

Erik Spiekermann Quotes Design 01

 

Bonus: video talks with Erik Spiekermann on design, typography and life lessons

 

Typographic Design in the Digital Domain

 

 

Erik Spiekermann: Typomaniac

 

 

Erik Spiekermann – Type Is Visible Language

 


Welcome to check the quotes by Mike Monteiro from «Design Is a Job» and by Aarron Walter from «Designing for Emotion«

Welcome to check issues of Tubik Quotes Collection on brandingusabilityuser-centered design and content strategy

Welcome to read or download Tubik Magazine free books on logo designdesign for business and problem-solving web design

Binned case study storyboard

Case Study: Binned. Design for Promo Video Production.

Creating a catchy and stylish promo video for a product or service is a challenging task. However, if realized wisely, it pays itself, becoming another powerful tool for growing brand awareness and promotion. Earlier we already unveiled the creative process of making a year-in-review video for Opera Software designed by Tubik team; today’s case study is going to show you a new story on graphic and motion design for a video introducing Binned, the local cleaning service based in the USA. This time the challenge to participate in animated promo video production was assigned to studio designers Arthur Avakyan and Andrey Drobovich. Let’s have a look at the creative flow.

 

video design animation tubik

 

Task

Graphic and motion design for promotional video production presenting the local trashbin cleaning service.

 

Process

Binned is a service supporting cleaner and healthier environment for the local community by washing and deodorizing the trash bins outdoors. The idea to support the brand promotion with the short, bright and catchy animated video was absolutely logical for this case: trashbins cleaning is not the topic to which people are ready to devote their precious time and read about all the benefits. Meanwhile, the promo video with funny and friendly characters could become a good way to inform the potential users of the service about all its advantages in short seconds.  Moreover, activating multiple directions of perception, video was found impactful in stimulating positive emotional appeal which was to the client’s liking.

 

At the first stage of collaboration with the company, Tubik team created the brand identity for the service including the logo in static and animated versions as well as the pack of branded items — you could have seen the detailed design story in our previous case study. The promo video had to look consistent with the visual style applied to branding and support the idea of the helpful service improving the quality of everyday life for its clients and making the environment healthier for everyone.

 

binned logo animation design

Binned logo

 

 

Storyboarding and graphic design

 

At the first stage, the client and the team agreed upon the visual concept for the video and general story it should transfer. Having got the brief and basic script of the video from the client, the graphic designer started the research and developed the first rough version of a storyboard for the story in the footage. As it usually does in the process of creating promotional videos for a company, storyboard means the illustrations arranged in the sequence of their flow for the video. They featured the images of a bin as a mascot presenting the service and the main character. In general terms, the video presented the story about a dirty and smelly trashbin which was really sad about its condition but then the truck of a cleaning service came and solved the problem quickly: dirt, insects and bad smell are removed and the bin is happy to serve people again. Below you can see the set of sketches for this stage. For this project, the graphic designer applied Adobe Photoshop for both digital sketches and final detailed illustrations.

 

binned video design storyboard

binned video design storyboard

binned video design storyboard

 

After discussing the flow with the client and agreeing upon the final number and sequence of shots for the future video, the next step meant creating a final storyboard for the video showing the scenario scene by scene. In a funny and friendly way, the short story showed the problems, which potential target audience could have, and the ways how Binned solves them easily. The style chosen for the video reflected the idea of the hand-drawn cartoon with a friendly and cute mascot. The color palette was focused on green and blue shades associated with a clean and healthy environment. One by one, the graphic designer made the final version of every part in the storyboard sequence following the consistent style and visual performance.

 

Binned case study storyboard

 

One of the microtasks at this stage was creating the funny images of the rats, insects and harmful bacterias that inhabit dirty trashbins and threaten the healthy lifestyle of the local people. Even being the negative characters of this story, they still supported the general cute and funny look chosen for the video.

Binned video design

 

As we mentioned in our guide to design in promo video production, at this stage it’s vital to set a constructive dialogue between the design team and the client: every single image in the storyboard should be discussed and approved in terms of general idea and goals set for the video. Motion design has many specific features and designers have to be ready to explain them: it can happen that clients express ideas and wishes which technically can overload the footage or look bad in the limited timing. Getting deeper into the goals and results which the client expects, designers looked for the optimal solutions which would make the video both good-looking and effective.

 

Animation

 

When all the storyboard was agreed upon, it was a good time to continue with motion. Here you can see how motion designer worked on visual details in different parts of the video: the magnifier glass featuring the process of a trashbin inspection, the process of loading the bins into the service truck and washing, the bins jumping happily after the wash. The design tool chosen for this type of animation was Adobe After Effects. 

 

binned_promo_video_animation_tubik

 

binned_promo_video_animation_tubik 

binned_promo_video_animation_tubik

 

It was another project for Tubik that proved the benefits of having graphic and motion designers in one team as they work together on all the details and assets from the earliest stages of the creative process and can consult with each other any moment it’s needed. It makes the workflow dynamic and productive enabling the client to get the video without wasting time on trying to bring several teams together.

 

Outcome

 

After the animation of all the shots was finished, it was thoroughly checked along the required timing and harmonic combination with the voice-over.  Here’s the final version of the video.

 

 

Binned project added one more bright page to the Tubik history providing the extensive case of participation in brand strategy for a service company, from creating visual identity elements up to consistent brand style guide and promo video. Don’t miss the updates, new case studies are just around the corner.


Welcome to read a case study on Binned Brand Identity Design

Welcome to check Binned Video project in Tubik Portfolio

Welcome to read a step-by-step guide to design for promo video production

video speeches for ui ux designers

Must-See Expert Speeches for UI/UX and Product Designers. Set 2.

Learning and innovation go hand in hand. The arrogance of success is to think that what you did yesterday will be sufficient for tomorrow. (William Pollard)

 

Our previous collection of video speeches from top experts in product design and user experience, which we published several months ago, got shared and actively viewed. There is no reason why we wouldn’t continue this sort of sharing, collecting great speeches from designers and product creators recognized internationally. That’s the precious part of being a professional in the era of the internet: you are able to get tips, recommendations, experience and knowledge from the best masters. So, catch the new set of expert talks we have collected for you and get inspired!

 

Julie Zhuo: How a Facebook Designer Thinks

 

 

Katie Dill: Balancing Order And Chaos In UX

 

 

David Vogel: Zen and the Art of UX Design

 

 

Cindy Chastain: Building the bridge from UX to CX

 

 

Joe Natoli: 5 Rules for Successful UX Disruption

 

 

Michael Bierut: How to use graphic design

 

 

Stephen P. Anderson: Hooked on a Feeling

 

 

Jakob Nielsen: Web UX 2016 vs 2004

 

 

Robert Brunner: What All Great Design Companies Know

 

 

Design+ Social Panel — Designers from the top social networks

 

 

Welcome to watch the first set of must-see speeches for UI/UX designers

Welcome to check 20 TED-talks for designers

video speeches for ui ux designers

15 Must-See Expert Speeches for UI/UX Designers

The year is counting its last days. As we could see in the article devoted to design trends in 2016, it’s been a bright, dynamic and diverse year for global design community. In addition to new trends and interesting digital products, it strengthened one of the core features of creative and career growth in the field of UI/UX design for digital products: to be highly professional and flexible for new challenges of the modern high technology, designers have to learn and improve themselves in non-stop mode. 

 

The domain of user experience and user interface design is so young, but already well-established: that’s amazing to see how many people, who started their career when the positions of UI and UX designers didn’t even exist in the list of specialities of higher educational institutions, now have grown into experts able to open the stunning area of knowledge and practice. And that’s a real luck for professionals all over the world to be able to share their findings via both real and online conferences with a view to getting the global design community stronger and more flexible for the sake of creating user-friendly problem-solving problems.

 

Today we would like to share and recommend you the collection of videos featuring deep and informative speeches from recognized experts in the sphere of creating digital products. They are devoted to different aspects of design for users and will definitely bring helpful and useful professional tips to UI/UX designers working over websites and mobile applications. So, enjoy watching, absorb knowledge and get inspired!

 

Hooked: How to Build Habit-Forming Products

by Nir Eyal

 

 

Designing Meaningful Animation

by Val Head

 

 

The Top 10 Things You Need to Know about Perception

by Susan Weinschenk

 

 

Designing Emotional Experiences

by Aarron Walter

 

 

Mind tricks & 7 Secrets of Behavioural Economics for UX Designer

by Lanny Geffen

 

 

How product design can change the world

by Christiaan Maats

 

 

How to manage for collective creativity

by Linda Hill

 

 

The complex relationship between data and design in UX

by Rochelle King

 

 

The art of innovation

by Guy Kawasaki

 

 

Why UX is not only the Responsibility of the UX’er

by Janne Jul Jensen

 

 

The Cognitive Abilities of Human Beings — Why Some Things are so Darn Hard!

by Janne Jul Jensen

 

 

Building a Winning UX Strategy Using the Kano Model

by Jared Spool

 

 

User eXperience

by Jesse James Garrett

 

 

Designing Better Conversations

by Justin Davis

 

 

Empathy: your secret weapon in designing for the web

by Nathalie Nahai

 


Originally collected for Design4Users

Welcome to check out 20 TED-talks for Designers

ted talks graphic design typography books

TED-talks: Typography, Books, Graphic Design.

It’s not a secret how diverse and influential is graphic design nowadays. It covers multiple purposes and serves a great deal of diverse spheres of human life and activity. Today it is enhanced and strengthened by broad opportunities of modern technologies, but new generations of the best designers keep following the roots and getting inspired by the experts.

 

One of the ways to inspiration we find productive and highly professional here in Tubik Studio is TED videos. Perhaps you remember the collections we have already suggested watching: 20 TED talks for designers about diverse design issues and 10 TED-talks for creatives from different spheres. Today we’re going to recommend you a new set of professional and informative TED and TEDx-talks that we find interesting, useful and helpful. 

 

Here is the collection of 10 TED-talks all with the descriptions given on the TED website or YouTube presentations. This time they are focused on the issues of graphic design. Most of them are already classic, sometimes even could be called legendary, and that makes them even more precious as they have been successfully checked with the time and practice. The ability to analyze take the best from the past usually broadens the creative horizons and becomes a solid foundation for innovative thinking. So, enjoy watching and feel the energy of great masters!

 

My life in typefaces — Matthew Carter

 

Pick up a book, magazine or screen, and more than likely you’ll come across some typography designed by Matthew Carter. In this charming talk, the man behind typefaces such as Verdana, Georgia and Bell Centennial (designed just for phone books — remember them?), takes us on a spin through a career focused on the very last pixel of each letter of a font.

 

 

Intricate beauty by design — Marian Bantjes

 

In graphic design, Marian Bantjes says, throwing your individuality into a project is heresy. She explains how she built her career doing just that, bringing her signature delicate illustrations to storefronts, valentines and even genetic diagrams.

 

 

The art of first impressions — in design and life — Chip Kidd

 

Book designer Chip Kidd knows all too well how often we judge things by first appearances. In this hilarious, fast-paced talk, he explains the two techniques designers use to communicate instantly — clarity and mystery — and when, why and how they work. He celebrates beautiful, useful pieces of design, skewers less successful work, and shares the thinking behind some of his own iconic book covers.

 

 

Designing books is no laughing matter. OK, it is. — Chip Kidd

 

Chip Kidd doesn’t judge books by their cover, he creates covers that embody the book — and he does it with a wicked sense of humor. In one of the funniest talks from TED2012, he shows the art and deep thought of his cover designs. This talk is from The Design Studio session at TED2012, guest-curated by Chee Pearlman and David Rockwell.

 

 

Can design save newspapers? — Jacek Utko

 

Jacek Utko is an extraordinary Polish newspaper designer whose redesigns for papers in Eastern Europe not only win awards, but increase circulation by up to 100%. Can good design save the newspaper? It just might.

 

 

Why write? Penmanship for the 21st Century — Jake Weidmann

 

What is the future of writing in the digital age, and why does it matter? In this surprising talk, Master Penman Jake Weidmann explores the connections between the pen and how we learn, think, and carry our cultural heritage at a time when the very act of writing is being dropped from school curricula across the country.

 

Jake Weidmann became the youngest person to receive his Master Penman certificate in July 2011. He works across several mediums including drawing in pencil and charcoal; pen and ink; painting in acrylic, airbrush, oil and gouache; sculpting in wood, bone, antler and clay; and is versed in numerous forms of calligraphy. He is best known for the integration of flourishing and hand- lettering in his art. Jake also designs his own hand-made pens. He, like his pens, travels the globe, reintroducing this Old World art form and cultivating its relevance in the world of today, of tomorrow, and forevermore.

 

 

The beauty of data visualization — David McCandless

 

David McCandless turns complex data sets (like worldwide military spending, media buzz, Facebook status updates) into beautiful, simple diagrams that tease out unseen patterns and connections. Good design, he suggests, is the best way to navigate information glut — and it may just change the way we see the world.

 

 

Wake up & smell the fonts — Sarah Hyndman

 

Sarah shares with us a story of type and invites us to consider our emotional response to the printed word. Each font/typeface has a personality that influences our interpretation of the words we read by evoking our emotions and setting the scene. We all understand this instinctively but it happens on a subconscious level. Sarah shows us that conscious awareness of the emotional life of fonts can be entertaining and ultimately give us more control over the decisions we make.

 

Designer Sarah Hyndman explores typography as we experience it in our every day lives under the banner of Type Tasting. Since the launch in 2013 she’s curated an exhibition at the V&A for the London Design Festival, been interviewed on Radio 4’s Today, taken Type Tasting to South by Southwest in Austin, Texas and has been commissioned to write a book.

 

Sarah has been a graphic designer for over 15 years, working in agencies before setting up design company With Relish. After studying an MA in Typo/Graphics at the London College of Communication she was invited back as a guest tutor.

 

 

Typography — now you see it — Shelley Gruendler

 

Dr Shelley Gruendler is a typographer, designer, and educator who teaches, lectures, and publishes internationally on typography and design. When she is not traveling the world as the founding director of Type Camp International, she is proud to live in the Canadian Typographic Archipelago.

 

 

The art of kinetic typography — Dan Boyarski

 

Dan Boyarski is a professor and former head of the School of Design at Carnegie Mellon University, where he has been for thirty-two years. His interests lie in visualizing complex information, interface and interaction design, and how word, image, sound, and movement may be combined for effective communication. In the spring of 1999, the Design Management Institute awarded Dan the Muriel Cooper Prize for «outstanding achievement in advancing design, technology, and communications in the digital environment.»

 

 

Check out the updates here, new collections of wise creative thoughts are already around the corner!

Book tubik design inspiration

20 TED-talks for Designers. Inspiration Full of Thoughts.

In creative jobs, design in particular, inspiration is one of the keys to productivity. Perhaps, one of the most productive kinds of inspiration is the one taken from experts, successful people who have experienced what they share. Today we’re going to recommend you a set of interesting and informative TED-talks that we think could be interesting, useful and helpful for designers as well as other creative people! Should be said, TED is a great resource of wise and informative things to learn in diverse directions and spheres, so we never miss the chance to share our findings there.

 

Here we offer you 20 TED-talks all with the descriptions given on the TED website. Most of them are already classic, sometimes even could be called legendary, and that makes them even more precious as they have been successfully checked with the time and practice. The ability to analyze take the best from the past usually broadens the creative horizons and becomes a solid foundation from innovative thinking. We also added some prominent thoughts full of wisdom and practical experience. So, let’s move on!

 

Don Norman: 3 ways good design makes you happy

 

In this talk from 2003, design critic Don Norman turns his incisive eye toward beauty, fun, pleasure and emotion, as he looks at design that makes people happy. He names the three emotional cues that a well-designed product must hit to succeed.

 

 

Some thoughts to remember:

 

The middle level of processing is the behavioral level and that’s actually where most of our stuff gets done. Visceral is subconscious, you’re unaware of it. Behavioral is subconscious, you’re unaware of it.Almost everything we do is subconscious. I’m walking around the stage — I’m not attending to the control of my legs. I’m doing a lot; most of my talk is subconscious; it has been rehearsed and thought about a lot. Most of what we do is subconscious. Automatic behavior — skilled behavior — is subconscious, controlled by the behavioral side. And behavioral design is all about feeling in control,which includes usability, understanding — but also the feel and heft.

 

Emotion is all about acting; emotion is really about acting. It’s being safe in the world. Cognition is about understanding the world, emotion is about interpreting it — saying good, bad, safe, dangerous, and getting us ready to act, which is why the muscles tense or relax. And that’s why we can tell the emotion of somebody else — because their muscles are acting, subconsciously, except that we’ve evolved to make the facial muscles really rich with emotion.

 

 

James Patten: The best computer interface? Maybe … your hands

 

“The computer is an incredibly powerful means of creative expression,” says designer and TED Fellow James Patten. But right now, we interact with computers, mainly, by typing and tapping. In this nifty talk and demo, Patten imagines a more visceral, physical way to bring your thoughts and ideas to life in the digital world, taking the computer interface off the screen and putting it into your hands.

 

 

Some thoughts to remember:

 

And when you think about it, this makes a lot of sense, that using specialized physical objects would help people use an interface more easily. I mean, our hands and our minds are optimized to think about and interact with tangible objects.

 

Margaret Gould Stewart: How giant websites design for you (and a billion others, too)

 

Facebook’s “like” and “share” buttons are seen 22 billion times a day, making them some of the most-viewed design elements ever created. Margaret Gould Stewart, Facebook’s director of product design, outlines three rules for design at such a massive scale — one so big that the tiniest of tweaks can cause global outrage, but also so large that the subtlest of improvements can positively impact the lives of many.

 

 

Some thoughts to remember:

 

Now, the first thing that you need to know about designing at scale is that the little things really matter.

 

The next thing that you need to understand as a principle is that when you introduce change, you need to do it extraordinarily carefully. Now I often have joked that I spend almost as much time designing the introduction of change as I do the change itself, and I’m sure that we can all relate to that when something that we use a lot changes and then we have to adjust. The fact is, people can become very efficient at using bad design, and so even if the change is good for them in the long run, it’s still incredibly frustrating when it happens, and this is particularly true with user-generated content platforms,because people can rightfully claim a sense of ownership. It is, after all, their content.

 

Matthew Carter: My life in typefaces

 

Pick up a book, magazine or screen, and more than likely you’ll come across some typography designed by Matthew Carter. In this charming talk, the man behind typefaces such as Verdana, Georgia and Bell Centennial (designed just for phone books — remember them?), takes us on a spin through a career focused on the very last pixel of each letter of a font.

 

 

Some thoughts to remember:

 

You know, at times of technical innovation, designers want to be influenced by what’s in the air. We want to respond. We want to be pushed into exploring something new.

 

Aris Venetikidis: Making sense of maps

 

Map designer Aris Venetikidis is fascinated by the maps we draw in our minds as we move around a city — less like street maps, more like schematics or wiring diagrams, abstract images of relationships between places. How can we learn from these mental maps to make better real ones? As a test case, he remakes the notorious Dublin bus map. (Filmed at TEDxDublin)

 

 

Some thoughts to remember:

 

So for a successful public transport map, we should not stick to accurate representation, but design them in the way our brains work.

 

Stefan Sagmeister: Happiness by Design

 

Graphic designer Stefan Sagmeister takes the audience on a whimsical journey through moments of his life that made him happy — and notes how many of these moments have to do with good design.

 

 

Some thoughts to remember:

You know, one is: just working without pressure. Then: working concentrated, without being frazzled. Or, as Nancy said before, like really immerse oneself into it. Try not to get stuck doing the same thing — or try not get stuck behind the computer all day. This is, you know, related to it: getting out of the studio. Then, of course, trying to, you know, work on things where the content is actually important for me. And being able to enjoy the end results.

 

Tony Fadell: The first secret of design is… noticing

 

As human beings, we get used to «the way things are» really fast. But for designers, the way things are is an opportunity … Could things be better? How? In this funny, breezy talk, the man behind the iPod and the Nest thermostat shares some of his tips for noticing — and driving — change.

 

 

Some thoughts to remember:

 

Why do we get used to everyday things? Well as human beings, we have limited brain power. And so our brains encode the everyday things we do into habits so we can free up space to learn new things. It’s a process called habituation and it’s one of the most basic ways, as humans, we learn.

 

My first tip is to look broader. You see, when you’re tackling a problem, sometimes, there are a lot of steps that lead up to that problem. And sometimes, a lot of steps after it. If you can take a step back and look broader, maybe you can change some of those boxes before the problem. Maybe you can combine them. Maybe you can remove them altogether to make that better.

 

Our challenge is to wake up each day and say, «How can I experience the world better?»

 

Chris Urmson: How a driverless car sees the road

 

Statistically, the least reliable part of the car is … the driver. Chris Urmson heads up Google’s driverless car program, one of several efforts to remove humans from the driver’s seat. He talks about where his program is right now, and shares fascinating footage that shows how the car sees the road and makes autonomous decisions about what to do next.

 

 

Some thoughts to remember:

 

The better the technology gets, the less reliable the driver is going to get.So by just making the cars incrementally smarter, we’re probably not going to see the wins we really need.

 

…it’s not to say that the driver assistance systems aren’t going to be incredibly valuable. They can save a lot of lives in the interim, but to see the transformative opportunity to help someone like Steve get around, to really get to the end case in safety, to have the opportunity to change our cities and move parking out and get rid of these urban craters we call parking lots, it’s the only way to go.

 

David Carson: Design and discovery

 

Great design is a never-ending journey of discovery — for which it helps to pack a healthy sense of humor. Sociologist and surfer-turned-designer David Carson walks through a gorgeous (and often quite funny) slide deck of his work and found images.

 

 

Some thoughts to remember:

 

I’m a big believer in the emotion of design, and the message that’s sent before somebody begins to read,before they get the rest of the information; what is the emotional response they get to the product, to the story, to the painting — whatever it is.

 

Why not experiment? Why not have some fun? Why not put some of yourself into the work? And when I was teaching, I used to always ask the students, What’s the definition of a good job? And as teachers, after you get all the answers, you like to give them the correct answer. And the best one I’ve heard — I’m sure some of you have heard this —the definition of a good job is: If you could afford to — if money wasn’t an issue — would you be doing that same work? And if you would, you’ve got a great job. And if you wouldn’t, what the heck are you doing? You’re going to be dead a really long time.

 

Philippe Starck: Design and destiny

 

Designer Philippe Starck — with no pretty slides to show — spends 18 minutes reaching for the very roots of the question «Why design?» Listen carefully for one perfect mantra for all of us, genius or not.

 

 

Some thoughts to remember:

 

And here is something: nobody is obliged to be a genius, but everybody is obliged to participate.

 

With billions of people who have been born, worked, lived and died before us, these people who have worked so much, we have now bring beautiful things, beautiful gifts, we know so many things. We can say to our children, OK, done, that was our story. That passed.Now you have a duty: invent a new story. Invent a new poetry. The only rule is, we have not to have any idea about the next story. We give you white pages. Invent. We give you the best tools, the best tools, and now, do it.

 

David Kelley: Human-centered design

 

IDEO’s David Kelley says that product design has become much less about the hardware and more about the user experience. He shows video of this new, broader approach, including footage from the Prada store in New York.

 

 

Some thoughts to remember:

 

…it’s really exciting that we’re taking a more human-centered approach to design, that we’re including behaviors and personalities in the things we do, and I think this is great. Designers are more trusted and more integrated into the business strategy of companies

 

Linda Hill: How to manage for collective creativity

 

What’s the secret to unlocking the creativity hidden inside your daily work, and giving every great idea a chance? Harvard professor Linda Hill, co-author of «Collective Genius,» has studied some of the world’s most creative companies to come up with a set of tools and tactics to keep great ideas flowing — from everyone in the company, not just the designated «creatives.»

 

 

Some thoughts to remember:

 

Leading innovation is not about creating a vision, and inspiring others to execute it. But what do we mean by innovation? An innovation is anything that is both new and useful. It can be a product or service. It can be a process or a way of organizing. It can be incremental, or it can be breakthrough. We have a pretty inclusive definition.

 

Innovation is not about solo genius, it’s about collective genius.

 

What we know is, at the heart of innovation is a paradox. You have to unleash the talents and passions of many people and you have to harness them into a work that is actually useful. Innovation is a journey. It’s a type of collaborative problem solving, usually among people who have different expertise and different points of view.

 

Ken Robinson: Do schools kill creativity?

 

Sir Ken Robinson makes an entertaining and profoundly moving case for creating an education system that nurtures (rather than undermines) creativity.

 

 

Some thoughts to remember:

 

I don’t mean to say that being wrong is the same thing as being creative. What we do know is, if you’re not prepared to be wrong, you’ll never come up with anything original — if you’re not prepared to be wrong. And by the time they get to be adults, most kids have lost that capacity. They have become frightened of being wrong. And we run our companies like this. We stigmatize mistakes. And we’re now running national education systems where mistakes are the worst thing you can make. And the result is that we are educating people out of their creative capacities.

 

We know three things about intelligence. One, it’s diverse. We think about the world in all the ways that we experience it. We think visually, we think in sound, we think kinesthetically. We think in abstract terms, we think in movement. Secondly, intelligence is dynamic. If you look at the interactions of a human brain,as we heard yesterday from a number of presentations, intelligence is wonderfully interactive. The brain isn’t divided into compartments. In fact, creativity — which I define as the process of having original ideas that have value — more often than not comes about through the interaction of different disciplinary ways of seeing things.

 

Young-ha Kim: Be an artist, right now!

 

Why do we ever stop playing and creating? With charm and humor, celebrated Korean author Young-ha Kim invokes the world’s greatest artists to urge you to unleash your inner child — the artist who wanted to play forever. (Filmed at TEDxSeoul.)

 

 

Some thoughts to remember:

 

We don’t know why we should be artists, but we have many reasons why we can’t be. Why do people instantly resist the idea of associating themselves with art? Perhaps you think art is for the greatly gifted or for the thoroughly and professionally trained. And some of you may think you’ve strayed too far from art. Well you might have, but I don’t think so. This is the theme of my talk today. We are all born artists.

 

David McCandless: The beauty of data visualization

 

David McCandless turns complex data sets (like worldwide military spending, media buzz, Facebook status updates) into beautiful, simple diagrams that tease out unseen patterns and connections. Good design, he suggests, is the best way to navigate information glut — and it may just change the way we see the world.

 

 

Some thoughts to remember:

 

The eye is exquisitely sensitive to patterns in variations in color, shape and pattern. It loves them, and it calls them beautiful. It’s the language of the eye. If you combine the language of the eye with the language of the mind, which is about words and numbers and concepts, you start speaking two languages simultaneously, each enhancing the other. So, you have the eye, and then you drop in the concepts. And that whole thing — it’s two languages both working at the same time.

 

Aaron Koblin: Visualizing ourselves … with crowd-sourced data

 

Artist Aaron Koblin takes vast amounts of data — and at times vast numbers of people — and weaves them into stunning visualizations. From elegant lines tracing airline flights to landscapes of cell phone data, from a Johnny Cash video assembled from crowd-sourced drawings to the «Wilderness Downtown» video that customizes for the user, his works brilliantly explore how modern technology can make us more human.

 

 

Some thoughts to remember:

 

Our lives are being driven by data, and the presentation of that data is an opportunity for us to make some amazing interfaces that tell great stories.

 

…an interface can be a powerful narrative device. And as we collect more and more personally and socially relevant data, we have an opportunity, and maybe even an obligation, to maintain the humanity and tell some amazing stories as we explore and collaborate together.

 

Golan Levin: Art that looks back at you

 

Golan Levin, an artist and engineer, uses modern tools — robotics, new software, cognitive research — to make artworks that surprise and delight. Watch as sounds become shapes, bodies create paintings, and a curious eye looks back at the curious viewer.

 

 

Some thoughts to remember:

 

I’m an artist, and I’m really interested in expanding the vocabulary of human action, and basically empowering people through interactivity. I want people to discover themselves as actors, as creative actors, by having interactive experiences.

 

Milton Glaser: Using design to make ideas new

 

From the TED archives: The legendary graphic designer Milton Glaser dives deep into a new painting inspired by Piero della Francesca. From here, he muses on what makes a convincing poster, by breaking down an idea and making it new.

 

 

Some thoughts to remember:

 

Sometimes, in the middle of a resistant problem, I write down things that I know about it. But you can see the beginning of an idea there, because you can see the word «new» emerging from the «old.» That’s what happens. There’s a relationship between the old and the new; the new emerges from the context of the old.

 

Tim Brown: Designers — think big!

 

Tim Brown says the design profession has a bigger role to play than just creating nifty, fashionable little objects. He calls for a shift to local, collaborative, participatory «design thinking» — starting with the example of 19th-century design thinker Isambard Kingdom Brunel.

 

 

Some thoughts to remember:

 

Systems thinkers who were reinventing the world, to a priesthood of folks in black turtlenecks and designer glasses working on small things. As our industrial society matured, so design became a profession and it focused on an ever smaller canvas until it came to stand for aesthetics, image and fashion.

 

So if human need is the place to start, then design thinking rapidly moves on to learning by making. Instead of thinking about what to build, building in order to think. Now, prototypes speed up the process of innovation, because it is only when we put our ideas out into the world that we really start to understand their strengths and weaknesses. And the faster we do that, the faster our ideas evolve.

 

Richard Seymour: How beauty feels

 

A story, a work of art, a face, a designed object — how do we tell that something is beautiful? And why does it matter so much to us? Designer Richard Seymour explores our response to beauty and the surprising power of objects that exhibit it.

 

 

Some thoughts to remember:

 

Form is function. It informs, it tells us, it supplies us answers before we’ve even thought about it. And so I’ve stopped using words like «form,» and I’ve stopped using words like «function» as a designer. What I try to pursue now is the emotional functionality of things. Because if I can get that right, I can make them wonderful, and I can make them repeatedly wonderful.


 

As we can see, the set of speeches is quite diverse: some of them are giving the examples of designs, some unveil the life and routine case of famous experts, some bring general ideas on creativity and design process aspects. Anyway, they enrich us with the ideas which bring us closer to the user, to creating efficient design and taking everything possible from our natural creativity.