Tag Archives: design expert

video speeches for ui ux designers

Must-See Expert Speeches for UI/UX and Product Designers. Set 2.

Learning and innovation go hand in hand. The arrogance of success is to think that what you did yesterday will be sufficient for tomorrow. (William Pollard)

 

Our previous collection of video speeches from top experts in product design and user experience, which we published several months ago, got shared and actively viewed. There is no reason why we wouldn’t continue this sort of sharing, collecting great speeches from designers and product creators recognized internationally. That’s the precious part of being a professional in the era of the internet: you are able to get tips, recommendations, experience and knowledge from the best masters. So, catch the new set of expert talks we have collected for you and get inspired!

 

Julie Zhuo: How a Facebook Designer Thinks

 

 

Katie Dill: Balancing Order And Chaos In UX

 

 

David Vogel: Zen and the Art of UX Design

 

 

Cindy Chastain: Building the bridge from UX to CX

 

 

Joe Natoli: 5 Rules for Successful UX Disruption

 

 

Michael Bierut: How to use graphic design

 

 

Stephen P. Anderson: Hooked on a Feeling

 

 

Jakob Nielsen: Web UX 2016 vs 2004

 

 

Robert Brunner: What All Great Design Companies Know

 

 

Design+ Social Panel — Designers from the top social networks

 

 

Welcome to watch the first set of must-see speeches for UI/UX designers

Welcome to check 20 TED-talks for designers

content strategy expert quotes

30 Expert Quotes on Content Strategy for Digital Products

Content is an inseparable part of any digital product. It helps to make websites and applications valuable for users and assists to increase user engagement of the product. However, the content created without certain purpose may seem confusing for users and have a bad influence on the credibility of the product. That’s why there always must be the well-thought strategy standing behind the powerful content. To dive deeper into the peculiarities of content strategy, we decided to refer to the professionals of this field. Today’s Tubik Quotes Collection presents the set of wise thoughts and tips from gurus of the content marketing and strategy including Kristina Halvorson, Lee Odden, and Joe Pulizzi.

content strategy expert quotes

«Content isn’t King, it’s the Kingdom.» (Lee Odden)

 

«A content strategy flips the tables on traditional, linear marketing by defining the process and then securing the right resources for producing a consistent stream of content mapped to buyer needs across all phases of the buying cycle.» (David Beebe)

 

«In my experience, the content strategist is a rare breed who’s often willing and able to embrace whatever role is necessary to deliver on the promise of useful, usable content.» (Kristina Halvorson)

 

«Focus on providing better answers for your audience: know that Google wants to have ‘answers’ for its audience, not just a lot of information.» (Cyrus Shepard)

 

«Treat your content like a product.» (Drew Davis)

 

«Here’s everything you need to know about creating killer content in 3 simple words: Clear. Concise. Compelling.» (Demian Farnworth)

 

content strategy expert quotes 2

 

«Your top of the funnel content must be intellectually divorced from your product but emotionally wed to it» (Joe Chernov)

 

«Content that understands its audience will be good content. Content that doesn’t can’t be.» (Doug Kessler)

 

«People don’t find content by mistake, or by accident. Every content plan needs a complementary promotion plan that combines paid, owned, and earned media.» (Matthew Gratt)

 

«It comes down to access. Giving the consumer something they can’t get anywhere else.»  (Jeffrey Moran)

 

«Create content that satisfies your uber goals and desires.» (Tom Webster)

 

«The key ingredient to better content is separating the single from the stream.» (David Hahn)

 

content strategy expert quotes 7

 

«Content that builds trust is human, personal, and relevant. It isn’t greedy, and it doesn’t trick people. If the recipient knew what the sender knows, would she still be happy? If the answer to that question is yes, then it’s likely it’s going to build trust.» (Seth Godin)

 

«There is no content strategy without measurement strategy. Before embarking on a content initiative, irrespective of medium or platform, it’s important to know what you want to achieve.» (Rebecca Lieb)

 

«Content is anything that adds value to the reader’s life.» (Avinash Kaushik)

 

«Curation is a natural and necessary extension of content creation. That is, as great as your content may be, your audience wants to learn from other experts and differing perspectives.» (Pawan Deshpande)

 

«Content should ask people to do something and reward them for it.» (Lee Odden)

 

«We need to create a business strategy for our content. That means saying no to many channels and content types, and focus on where we can build an asset, an audience, over time.» (Joe Pulizzi)

 

«Content precedes design. Design in the absence of content is not design, it’s decoration.» (Jeffrey Zeldman)

content strategy expert quotes 3

 

«The new era demands a focus on ignition, not just content, on trust, not just traffic, and on the elite people in your audience who are spreading and advocating your content.» (Mark Schaefer)

 

«Quality, relevant content can’t be spotted by an algorithm. You can’t subscribe to it. You need people — actual human beings — to create or curate it.» (Kristina Halvorson)

 

«The more content I put out, the more luck I have.» (Gary Vaynerchuk)

 

«Create content that reaches your audience’s audience.» (Ann Handley)

 

«Stop thinking about flat websites and get your content out of the domain.» (Robert Simon)

 

«Content builds relationships. Relationships are built on trust. Trust drives revenue.» (Andrew Davis)

content strategy expert quotes 4

 

«Just as your content needs to target customers at every step of their journey with you, it also needs to appeal to their rational and emotional sides. Every customer needs to have their interest piqued, engagement provoked and confidence built.» (Mark Wilson)

 

«In the future I see a democratization of content creation through content relationships with famous influencers (brandividuals) and niche influencers alike. There’s upside to content co-creation for both brands and contributors. The influencers get exposure to the brand community and the brand gets exposure to better quality content shared with an entirely new audience.» (Lee Odden)

 

«Pushing out content you want to publish is very different to executing a successful content marketing program- one that connects with customers by delivering meaningful experiences that are contextually relevant.» (Ardath Albee)

 

«People use content to express identity.» (Ze Frank)

 

«Actually talk to your customers. Use the language that they use. Talk about the things they talk about. Never feed salad to a lion.» (Jay Acunzo)

content strategy expert quotes


Welcome to check issues of Tubik Quotes Collection on branding, usability and user-centered design

video speeches for ui ux designers

15 Must-See Expert Speeches for UI/UX Designers

The year is counting its last days. As we could see in the article devoted to design trends in 2016, it’s been a bright, dynamic and diverse year for global design community. In addition to new trends and interesting digital products, it strengthened one of the core features of creative and career growth in the field of UI/UX design for digital products: to be highly professional and flexible for new challenges of the modern high technology, designers have to learn and improve themselves in non-stop mode. 

 

The domain of user experience and user interface design is so young, but already well-established: that’s amazing to see how many people, who started their career when the positions of UI and UX designers didn’t even exist in the list of specialities of higher educational institutions, now have grown into experts able to open the stunning area of knowledge and practice. And that’s a real luck for professionals all over the world to be able to share their findings via both real and online conferences with a view to getting the global design community stronger and more flexible for the sake of creating user-friendly problem-solving problems.

 

Today we would like to share and recommend you the collection of videos featuring deep and informative speeches from recognized experts in the sphere of creating digital products. They are devoted to different aspects of design for users and will definitely bring helpful and useful professional tips to UI/UX designers working over websites and mobile applications. So, enjoy watching, absorb knowledge and get inspired!

 

Hooked: How to Build Habit-Forming Products

by Nir Eyal

 

 

Designing Meaningful Animation

by Val Head

 

 

The Top 10 Things You Need to Know about Perception

by Susan Weinschenk

 

 

Designing Emotional Experiences

by Aarron Walter

 

 

Mind tricks & 7 Secrets of Behavioural Economics for UX Designer

by Lanny Geffen

 

 

How product design can change the world

by Christiaan Maats

 

 

How to manage for collective creativity

by Linda Hill

 

 

The complex relationship between data and design in UX

by Rochelle King

 

 

The art of innovation

by Guy Kawasaki

 

 

Why UX is not only the Responsibility of the UX’er

by Janne Jul Jensen

 

 

The Cognitive Abilities of Human Beings — Why Some Things are so Darn Hard!

by Janne Jul Jensen

 

 

Building a Winning UX Strategy Using the Kano Model

by Jared Spool

 

 

User eXperience

by Jesse James Garrett

 

 

Designing Better Conversations

by Justin Davis

 

 

Empathy: your secret weapon in designing for the web

by Nathalie Nahai

 


Originally collected for Design4Users

Welcome to check out 20 TED-talks for Designers

ted talks graphic design typography books

TED-talks: Typography, Books, Graphic Design.

It’s not a secret how diverse and influential is graphic design nowadays. It covers multiple purposes and serves a great deal of diverse spheres of human life and activity. Today it is enhanced and strengthened by broad opportunities of modern technologies, but new generations of the best designers keep following the roots and getting inspired by the experts.

 

One of the ways to inspiration we find productive and highly professional here in Tubik Studio is TED videos. Perhaps you remember the collections we have already suggested watching: 20 TED talks for designers about diverse design issues and 10 TED-talks for creatives from different spheres. Today we’re going to recommend you a new set of professional and informative TED and TEDx-talks that we find interesting, useful and helpful. 

 

Here is the collection of 10 TED-talks all with the descriptions given on the TED website or YouTube presentations. This time they are focused on the issues of graphic design. Most of them are already classic, sometimes even could be called legendary, and that makes them even more precious as they have been successfully checked with the time and practice. The ability to analyze take the best from the past usually broadens the creative horizons and becomes a solid foundation for innovative thinking. So, enjoy watching and feel the energy of great masters!

 

My life in typefaces — Matthew Carter

 

Pick up a book, magazine or screen, and more than likely you’ll come across some typography designed by Matthew Carter. In this charming talk, the man behind typefaces such as Verdana, Georgia and Bell Centennial (designed just for phone books — remember them?), takes us on a spin through a career focused on the very last pixel of each letter of a font.

 

 

Intricate beauty by design — Marian Bantjes

 

In graphic design, Marian Bantjes says, throwing your individuality into a project is heresy. She explains how she built her career doing just that, bringing her signature delicate illustrations to storefronts, valentines and even genetic diagrams.

 

 

The art of first impressions — in design and life — Chip Kidd

 

Book designer Chip Kidd knows all too well how often we judge things by first appearances. In this hilarious, fast-paced talk, he explains the two techniques designers use to communicate instantly — clarity and mystery — and when, why and how they work. He celebrates beautiful, useful pieces of design, skewers less successful work, and shares the thinking behind some of his own iconic book covers.

 

 

Designing books is no laughing matter. OK, it is. — Chip Kidd

 

Chip Kidd doesn’t judge books by their cover, he creates covers that embody the book — and he does it with a wicked sense of humor. In one of the funniest talks from TED2012, he shows the art and deep thought of his cover designs. This talk is from The Design Studio session at TED2012, guest-curated by Chee Pearlman and David Rockwell.

 

 

Can design save newspapers? — Jacek Utko

 

Jacek Utko is an extraordinary Polish newspaper designer whose redesigns for papers in Eastern Europe not only win awards, but increase circulation by up to 100%. Can good design save the newspaper? It just might.

 

 

Why write? Penmanship for the 21st Century — Jake Weidmann

 

What is the future of writing in the digital age, and why does it matter? In this surprising talk, Master Penman Jake Weidmann explores the connections between the pen and how we learn, think, and carry our cultural heritage at a time when the very act of writing is being dropped from school curricula across the country.

 

Jake Weidmann became the youngest person to receive his Master Penman certificate in July 2011. He works across several mediums including drawing in pencil and charcoal; pen and ink; painting in acrylic, airbrush, oil and gouache; sculpting in wood, bone, antler and clay; and is versed in numerous forms of calligraphy. He is best known for the integration of flourishing and hand- lettering in his art. Jake also designs his own hand-made pens. He, like his pens, travels the globe, reintroducing this Old World art form and cultivating its relevance in the world of today, of tomorrow, and forevermore.

 

 

The beauty of data visualization — David McCandless

 

David McCandless turns complex data sets (like worldwide military spending, media buzz, Facebook status updates) into beautiful, simple diagrams that tease out unseen patterns and connections. Good design, he suggests, is the best way to navigate information glut — and it may just change the way we see the world.

 

 

Wake up & smell the fonts — Sarah Hyndman

 

Sarah shares with us a story of type and invites us to consider our emotional response to the printed word. Each font/typeface has a personality that influences our interpretation of the words we read by evoking our emotions and setting the scene. We all understand this instinctively but it happens on a subconscious level. Sarah shows us that conscious awareness of the emotional life of fonts can be entertaining and ultimately give us more control over the decisions we make.

 

Designer Sarah Hyndman explores typography as we experience it in our every day lives under the banner of Type Tasting. Since the launch in 2013 she’s curated an exhibition at the V&A for the London Design Festival, been interviewed on Radio 4’s Today, taken Type Tasting to South by Southwest in Austin, Texas and has been commissioned to write a book.

 

Sarah has been a graphic designer for over 15 years, working in agencies before setting up design company With Relish. After studying an MA in Typo/Graphics at the London College of Communication she was invited back as a guest tutor.

 

 

Typography — now you see it — Shelley Gruendler

 

Dr Shelley Gruendler is a typographer, designer, and educator who teaches, lectures, and publishes internationally on typography and design. When she is not traveling the world as the founding director of Type Camp International, she is proud to live in the Canadian Typographic Archipelago.

 

 

The art of kinetic typography — Dan Boyarski

 

Dan Boyarski is a professor and former head of the School of Design at Carnegie Mellon University, where he has been for thirty-two years. His interests lie in visualizing complex information, interface and interaction design, and how word, image, sound, and movement may be combined for effective communication. In the spring of 1999, the Design Management Institute awarded Dan the Muriel Cooper Prize for «outstanding achievement in advancing design, technology, and communications in the digital environment.»

 

 

Check out the updates here, new collections of wise creative thoughts are already around the corner!

Book tubik design inspiration

20 TED-talks for Designers. Inspiration Full of Thoughts.

In creative jobs, design in particular, inspiration is one of the keys to productivity. Perhaps, one of the most productive kinds of inspiration is the one taken from experts, successful people who have experienced what they share. Today we’re going to recommend you a set of interesting and informative TED-talks that we think could be interesting, useful and helpful for designers as well as other creative people! Should be said, TED is a great resource of wise and informative things to learn in diverse directions and spheres, so we never miss the chance to share our findings there.

 

Here we offer you 20 TED-talks all with the descriptions given on the TED website. Most of them are already classic, sometimes even could be called legendary, and that makes them even more precious as they have been successfully checked with the time and practice. The ability to analyze take the best from the past usually broadens the creative horizons and becomes a solid foundation from innovative thinking. We also added some prominent thoughts full of wisdom and practical experience. So, let’s move on!

 

Don Norman: 3 ways good design makes you happy

 

In this talk from 2003, design critic Don Norman turns his incisive eye toward beauty, fun, pleasure and emotion, as he looks at design that makes people happy. He names the three emotional cues that a well-designed product must hit to succeed.

 

 

Some thoughts to remember:

 

The middle level of processing is the behavioral level and that’s actually where most of our stuff gets done. Visceral is subconscious, you’re unaware of it. Behavioral is subconscious, you’re unaware of it.Almost everything we do is subconscious. I’m walking around the stage — I’m not attending to the control of my legs. I’m doing a lot; most of my talk is subconscious; it has been rehearsed and thought about a lot. Most of what we do is subconscious. Automatic behavior — skilled behavior — is subconscious, controlled by the behavioral side. And behavioral design is all about feeling in control,which includes usability, understanding — but also the feel and heft.

 

Emotion is all about acting; emotion is really about acting. It’s being safe in the world. Cognition is about understanding the world, emotion is about interpreting it — saying good, bad, safe, dangerous, and getting us ready to act, which is why the muscles tense or relax. And that’s why we can tell the emotion of somebody else — because their muscles are acting, subconsciously, except that we’ve evolved to make the facial muscles really rich with emotion.

 

 

James Patten: The best computer interface? Maybe … your hands

 

“The computer is an incredibly powerful means of creative expression,” says designer and TED Fellow James Patten. But right now, we interact with computers, mainly, by typing and tapping. In this nifty talk and demo, Patten imagines a more visceral, physical way to bring your thoughts and ideas to life in the digital world, taking the computer interface off the screen and putting it into your hands.

 

 

Some thoughts to remember:

 

And when you think about it, this makes a lot of sense, that using specialized physical objects would help people use an interface more easily. I mean, our hands and our minds are optimized to think about and interact with tangible objects.

 

Margaret Gould Stewart: How giant websites design for you (and a billion others, too)

 

Facebook’s “like” and “share” buttons are seen 22 billion times a day, making them some of the most-viewed design elements ever created. Margaret Gould Stewart, Facebook’s director of product design, outlines three rules for design at such a massive scale — one so big that the tiniest of tweaks can cause global outrage, but also so large that the subtlest of improvements can positively impact the lives of many.

 

 

Some thoughts to remember:

 

Now, the first thing that you need to know about designing at scale is that the little things really matter.

 

The next thing that you need to understand as a principle is that when you introduce change, you need to do it extraordinarily carefully. Now I often have joked that I spend almost as much time designing the introduction of change as I do the change itself, and I’m sure that we can all relate to that when something that we use a lot changes and then we have to adjust. The fact is, people can become very efficient at using bad design, and so even if the change is good for them in the long run, it’s still incredibly frustrating when it happens, and this is particularly true with user-generated content platforms,because people can rightfully claim a sense of ownership. It is, after all, their content.

 

Matthew Carter: My life in typefaces

 

Pick up a book, magazine or screen, and more than likely you’ll come across some typography designed by Matthew Carter. In this charming talk, the man behind typefaces such as Verdana, Georgia and Bell Centennial (designed just for phone books — remember them?), takes us on a spin through a career focused on the very last pixel of each letter of a font.

 

 

Some thoughts to remember:

 

You know, at times of technical innovation, designers want to be influenced by what’s in the air. We want to respond. We want to be pushed into exploring something new.

 

Aris Venetikidis: Making sense of maps

 

Map designer Aris Venetikidis is fascinated by the maps we draw in our minds as we move around a city — less like street maps, more like schematics or wiring diagrams, abstract images of relationships between places. How can we learn from these mental maps to make better real ones? As a test case, he remakes the notorious Dublin bus map. (Filmed at TEDxDublin)

 

 

Some thoughts to remember:

 

So for a successful public transport map, we should not stick to accurate representation, but design them in the way our brains work.

 

Stefan Sagmeister: Happiness by Design

 

Graphic designer Stefan Sagmeister takes the audience on a whimsical journey through moments of his life that made him happy — and notes how many of these moments have to do with good design.

 

 

Some thoughts to remember:

You know, one is: just working without pressure. Then: working concentrated, without being frazzled. Or, as Nancy said before, like really immerse oneself into it. Try not to get stuck doing the same thing — or try not get stuck behind the computer all day. This is, you know, related to it: getting out of the studio. Then, of course, trying to, you know, work on things where the content is actually important for me. And being able to enjoy the end results.

 

Tony Fadell: The first secret of design is… noticing

 

As human beings, we get used to «the way things are» really fast. But for designers, the way things are is an opportunity … Could things be better? How? In this funny, breezy talk, the man behind the iPod and the Nest thermostat shares some of his tips for noticing — and driving — change.

 

 

Some thoughts to remember:

 

Why do we get used to everyday things? Well as human beings, we have limited brain power. And so our brains encode the everyday things we do into habits so we can free up space to learn new things. It’s a process called habituation and it’s one of the most basic ways, as humans, we learn.

 

My first tip is to look broader. You see, when you’re tackling a problem, sometimes, there are a lot of steps that lead up to that problem. And sometimes, a lot of steps after it. If you can take a step back and look broader, maybe you can change some of those boxes before the problem. Maybe you can combine them. Maybe you can remove them altogether to make that better.

 

Our challenge is to wake up each day and say, «How can I experience the world better?»

 

Chris Urmson: How a driverless car sees the road

 

Statistically, the least reliable part of the car is … the driver. Chris Urmson heads up Google’s driverless car program, one of several efforts to remove humans from the driver’s seat. He talks about where his program is right now, and shares fascinating footage that shows how the car sees the road and makes autonomous decisions about what to do next.

 

 

Some thoughts to remember:

 

The better the technology gets, the less reliable the driver is going to get.So by just making the cars incrementally smarter, we’re probably not going to see the wins we really need.

 

…it’s not to say that the driver assistance systems aren’t going to be incredibly valuable. They can save a lot of lives in the interim, but to see the transformative opportunity to help someone like Steve get around, to really get to the end case in safety, to have the opportunity to change our cities and move parking out and get rid of these urban craters we call parking lots, it’s the only way to go.

 

David Carson: Design and discovery

 

Great design is a never-ending journey of discovery — for which it helps to pack a healthy sense of humor. Sociologist and surfer-turned-designer David Carson walks through a gorgeous (and often quite funny) slide deck of his work and found images.

 

 

Some thoughts to remember:

 

I’m a big believer in the emotion of design, and the message that’s sent before somebody begins to read,before they get the rest of the information; what is the emotional response they get to the product, to the story, to the painting — whatever it is.

 

Why not experiment? Why not have some fun? Why not put some of yourself into the work? And when I was teaching, I used to always ask the students, What’s the definition of a good job? And as teachers, after you get all the answers, you like to give them the correct answer. And the best one I’ve heard — I’m sure some of you have heard this —the definition of a good job is: If you could afford to — if money wasn’t an issue — would you be doing that same work? And if you would, you’ve got a great job. And if you wouldn’t, what the heck are you doing? You’re going to be dead a really long time.

 

Philippe Starck: Design and destiny

 

Designer Philippe Starck — with no pretty slides to show — spends 18 minutes reaching for the very roots of the question «Why design?» Listen carefully for one perfect mantra for all of us, genius or not.

 

 

Some thoughts to remember:

 

And here is something: nobody is obliged to be a genius, but everybody is obliged to participate.

 

With billions of people who have been born, worked, lived and died before us, these people who have worked so much, we have now bring beautiful things, beautiful gifts, we know so many things. We can say to our children, OK, done, that was our story. That passed.Now you have a duty: invent a new story. Invent a new poetry. The only rule is, we have not to have any idea about the next story. We give you white pages. Invent. We give you the best tools, the best tools, and now, do it.

 

David Kelley: Human-centered design

 

IDEO’s David Kelley says that product design has become much less about the hardware and more about the user experience. He shows video of this new, broader approach, including footage from the Prada store in New York.

 

 

Some thoughts to remember:

 

…it’s really exciting that we’re taking a more human-centered approach to design, that we’re including behaviors and personalities in the things we do, and I think this is great. Designers are more trusted and more integrated into the business strategy of companies

 

Linda Hill: How to manage for collective creativity

 

What’s the secret to unlocking the creativity hidden inside your daily work, and giving every great idea a chance? Harvard professor Linda Hill, co-author of «Collective Genius,» has studied some of the world’s most creative companies to come up with a set of tools and tactics to keep great ideas flowing — from everyone in the company, not just the designated «creatives.»

 

 

Some thoughts to remember:

 

Leading innovation is not about creating a vision, and inspiring others to execute it. But what do we mean by innovation? An innovation is anything that is both new and useful. It can be a product or service. It can be a process or a way of organizing. It can be incremental, or it can be breakthrough. We have a pretty inclusive definition.

 

Innovation is not about solo genius, it’s about collective genius.

 

What we know is, at the heart of innovation is a paradox. You have to unleash the talents and passions of many people and you have to harness them into a work that is actually useful. Innovation is a journey. It’s a type of collaborative problem solving, usually among people who have different expertise and different points of view.

 

Ken Robinson: Do schools kill creativity?

 

Sir Ken Robinson makes an entertaining and profoundly moving case for creating an education system that nurtures (rather than undermines) creativity.

 

 

Some thoughts to remember:

 

I don’t mean to say that being wrong is the same thing as being creative. What we do know is, if you’re not prepared to be wrong, you’ll never come up with anything original — if you’re not prepared to be wrong. And by the time they get to be adults, most kids have lost that capacity. They have become frightened of being wrong. And we run our companies like this. We stigmatize mistakes. And we’re now running national education systems where mistakes are the worst thing you can make. And the result is that we are educating people out of their creative capacities.

 

We know three things about intelligence. One, it’s diverse. We think about the world in all the ways that we experience it. We think visually, we think in sound, we think kinesthetically. We think in abstract terms, we think in movement. Secondly, intelligence is dynamic. If you look at the interactions of a human brain,as we heard yesterday from a number of presentations, intelligence is wonderfully interactive. The brain isn’t divided into compartments. In fact, creativity — which I define as the process of having original ideas that have value — more often than not comes about through the interaction of different disciplinary ways of seeing things.

 

Young-ha Kim: Be an artist, right now!

 

Why do we ever stop playing and creating? With charm and humor, celebrated Korean author Young-ha Kim invokes the world’s greatest artists to urge you to unleash your inner child — the artist who wanted to play forever. (Filmed at TEDxSeoul.)

 

 

Some thoughts to remember:

 

We don’t know why we should be artists, but we have many reasons why we can’t be. Why do people instantly resist the idea of associating themselves with art? Perhaps you think art is for the greatly gifted or for the thoroughly and professionally trained. And some of you may think you’ve strayed too far from art. Well you might have, but I don’t think so. This is the theme of my talk today. We are all born artists.

 

David McCandless: The beauty of data visualization

 

David McCandless turns complex data sets (like worldwide military spending, media buzz, Facebook status updates) into beautiful, simple diagrams that tease out unseen patterns and connections. Good design, he suggests, is the best way to navigate information glut — and it may just change the way we see the world.

 

 

Some thoughts to remember:

 

The eye is exquisitely sensitive to patterns in variations in color, shape and pattern. It loves them, and it calls them beautiful. It’s the language of the eye. If you combine the language of the eye with the language of the mind, which is about words and numbers and concepts, you start speaking two languages simultaneously, each enhancing the other. So, you have the eye, and then you drop in the concepts. And that whole thing — it’s two languages both working at the same time.

 

Aaron Koblin: Visualizing ourselves … with crowd-sourced data

 

Artist Aaron Koblin takes vast amounts of data — and at times vast numbers of people — and weaves them into stunning visualizations. From elegant lines tracing airline flights to landscapes of cell phone data, from a Johnny Cash video assembled from crowd-sourced drawings to the «Wilderness Downtown» video that customizes for the user, his works brilliantly explore how modern technology can make us more human.

 

 

Some thoughts to remember:

 

Our lives are being driven by data, and the presentation of that data is an opportunity for us to make some amazing interfaces that tell great stories.

 

…an interface can be a powerful narrative device. And as we collect more and more personally and socially relevant data, we have an opportunity, and maybe even an obligation, to maintain the humanity and tell some amazing stories as we explore and collaborate together.

 

Golan Levin: Art that looks back at you

 

Golan Levin, an artist and engineer, uses modern tools — robotics, new software, cognitive research — to make artworks that surprise and delight. Watch as sounds become shapes, bodies create paintings, and a curious eye looks back at the curious viewer.

 

 

Some thoughts to remember:

 

I’m an artist, and I’m really interested in expanding the vocabulary of human action, and basically empowering people through interactivity. I want people to discover themselves as actors, as creative actors, by having interactive experiences.

 

Milton Glaser: Using design to make ideas new

 

From the TED archives: The legendary graphic designer Milton Glaser dives deep into a new painting inspired by Piero della Francesca. From here, he muses on what makes a convincing poster, by breaking down an idea and making it new.

 

 

Some thoughts to remember:

 

Sometimes, in the middle of a resistant problem, I write down things that I know about it. But you can see the beginning of an idea there, because you can see the word «new» emerging from the «old.» That’s what happens. There’s a relationship between the old and the new; the new emerges from the context of the old.

 

Tim Brown: Designers — think big!

 

Tim Brown says the design profession has a bigger role to play than just creating nifty, fashionable little objects. He calls for a shift to local, collaborative, participatory «design thinking» — starting with the example of 19th-century design thinker Isambard Kingdom Brunel.

 

 

Some thoughts to remember:

 

Systems thinkers who were reinventing the world, to a priesthood of folks in black turtlenecks and designer glasses working on small things. As our industrial society matured, so design became a profession and it focused on an ever smaller canvas until it came to stand for aesthetics, image and fashion.

 

So if human need is the place to start, then design thinking rapidly moves on to learning by making. Instead of thinking about what to build, building in order to think. Now, prototypes speed up the process of innovation, because it is only when we put our ideas out into the world that we really start to understand their strengths and weaknesses. And the faster we do that, the faster our ideas evolve.

 

Richard Seymour: How beauty feels

 

A story, a work of art, a face, a designed object — how do we tell that something is beautiful? And why does it matter so much to us? Designer Richard Seymour explores our response to beauty and the surprising power of objects that exhibit it.

 

 

Some thoughts to remember:

 

Form is function. It informs, it tells us, it supplies us answers before we’ve even thought about it. And so I’ve stopped using words like «form,» and I’ve stopped using words like «function» as a designer. What I try to pursue now is the emotional functionality of things. Because if I can get that right, I can make them wonderful, and I can make them repeatedly wonderful.


 

As we can see, the set of speeches is quite diverse: some of them are giving the examples of designs, some unveil the life and routine case of famous experts, some bring general ideas on creativity and design process aspects. Anyway, they enrich us with the ideas which bring us closer to the user, to creating efficient design and taking everything possible from our natural creativity.

tubik studio quote collection

30 Quotes on User-Centered Interaction Design

Inspiration and wisdom absorbed from the best professionals in the trade have always been the great source of motivation and consideration of the basics. Today we add the new set of our favorite wise thoughts and ideas to Tubik Quotes Collection. They are all based on great practical experience of well-known experts in the sphere of design and this time are concentrated on the important issues and tips of user-centered interaction design. Let’s get inspired from the masters!

 

tubik studio quotes

 

«People should never feel like a failure when using technology. Like the customer, the user is always right. If software crashes, it is the software designer’s fault. if someone can’t find something on a web site, it is the web designer’s fault… The big difference between good and bad designers is how they handle people struggling with their design. Technology serves humans. Humans do not serve technology.» (Joshua Porter)

 

«Your app might be a technological marvel, but don’t forget that it’s people who need to interact with it.» (UXPin team)

 

«People ignore design that ignores people.» (Frank Chimero)

 

«Feedback is the heart of interaction. If user interaction is a conversation between your user and the product, then your product better participate in a friendly, interesting, and helpful manner.» (UXPin team)

 

Tubik quote collection

 

«In an ideal world, a user would remember every function after only a single use, but we do not live in idealism. The reality is that familiarity and intuition must be consciously designed into the interface.» (UXPin team)

 

«Our opportunity, as designers, is to learn how to handle the complexity, rather than shy away from it, and to realize that the big art of design is to make complicated things simple.»  (Tim Parsey)

 

«It is easy to fail when designing an interactive experience. Designers fail when they do not know the audience, integrate the threads of content and context, welcome the public properly, or make clear what the experience is and what the audience’s role in it will be.» (Edwin Schlossberg)

 

«Good design is a lot like clear thinking made visual.» (Edward Tufte)

 

Tubik studio quote collection

 

 

«HCI draws on many disciplines, as we shall see, but it is in computer science and systems design that it must be accepted as a central concern. For all the other disciplines it can be a specialism, albeit one that provides crucial input; for systems design it is an essential part of the design process. From this perspective, HCI involves the design, implementation and evaluation of interactive systems in the context of the user’s task and work.» (Alan Dix, Janet E. Finlay, Gregory D. Abowd, Russell Beale)

 

«To design is to communicate clearly by whatever means you can control or master.» (Milton Glaser)

 

«Don’t make something unless it’s both necessary and useful. But if it is both necessary and useful, don’t hesitate to make it beautiful.» (Josh Porter)

 

Tubik studio quote collection

 

«The details are not the details. They make the design.» (Charles Eames)

 

«Good design is design that changes behavior for the better. I think it needs to take into account the context of the environment, of the human condition, the culture, and then attempt to make the things you do—make us do them better, make us do better things. It encourages us to change the way that we live.»  (Jon Kolko)

 

«It’s not enough that we build products that function, that are understandable and usable, we also need to build products that bring joy and excitement, pleasure and fun, and yes, beauty to people’s lives.»  (Don Norman)

 

Tubik studio quotes collection

 

«Good UI design gives users a comprehensible sense of power that consistently helps them feel in control.» (Jim Nielsen)

 

«In situations of stress, people will be less able to cope with complex problem solving or managing difficult interfaces, whereas if people are relaxed they will be more forgiving of limitations in the design. This does not give us an excuse to design bad interfaces but does suggest that if we build interfaces that promote positive responses – for example by using aesthetics or reward – then they are likely be more successful.» (Alan Dix, Janet E. Finlay, Gregory D. Abowd, Russell Beale)

 

«When we interact with computers, what are we trying to achieve? Consider what happens when we interact with each other – we are either passing information to other people, or receiving information from them. Often, the information we receive is in response to the information that we have recently imparted to them, and we may then respond to that. Interaction is therefore a process of information transfer. Relating this to the electronic computer, the same principles hold: interaction is a process of information transfer, from the user to the computer and from the computer to the user.»  (Alan Dix, Janet E. Finlay, Gregory D. Abowd, Russell Beale)

 

«Interaction is the essence of all user experiences. It is the conversation between your product and your user, and if the conversation is boring, your user will leave and talk to someone more interesting.» (UXPin team)

 

Tubik studio quotes collection

 

«Interaction design isn’t about how interfaces behave, it’s about how people behave, and then adapting technology accordingly. It’s a two-part challenge: first, you must know your target users on a level that reveals what they like and what they expect; second, you must figure out how to satisfy those needs given your technological constraints.» (UXPin team)

 

«To our human minds, computers behave less like rocks and trees than they do like humans, so we unconsciously treat them like people…. In other words, humans have special instincts that tell them how to behave around other sentient beings, and as soon as any object exhibits sufficient cognitive function, those instincts kick in and we react as though we were interacting with another sentient human being.» (Alan Cooper)

 

«If we want users to like our software we should design it to behave like a likeable person: respectful, generous and helpful.» (Alan Cooper)

 

Tubik studio quotes collection

 

«A powerful tool in the early stages of developing scenarios is to pretend the interface is magic. If your persona has goals and the product has magical powers to meet them, how simple could the interaction be? This kind of thinking is useful to help designers look outside the box.» (Alan Cooper)

 

«User-centered design means understanding what your users need, how they think, and how they behave — and incorporating that understanding into every aspect of your process.» (Jesse James Garrett)

 

«As much as we may want to withdraw into a world of pure problem solving, we have to acknowledge that the most successful architectures are the ones you can actually convince someone to implement.» (Jesse James Garrett)

 

«Designers shooting for usable is like a chef shooting for edible.» (Aarron Walter)

 

Tubik studio quotes collection

 

«Problems with visual design can turn users off so quickly that they never discover all the smart choices you made with navigation or interaction design.» (Jesse James Garrett)

 

«Good design, when it’s done well, becomes invisible. It’s only when it’s done poorly that we notice it. Think of it like a room’s air conditioning. We only notice it when it’s too hot, too cold, making too much noise, or the unit is dripping on us. Yet, if the air conditioning is perfect, nobody say anything and we focus, instead, on the task at hand.» (Jared Spool)

 

«Get closer than ever to your customers. So close that you tell them what they need well before they realize it themselves.» (Steve Jobs)

 

Tubik studio quotes collection

 

«Beauty and brains, pleasure and usability — they should go hand in hand.» (Donald A. Norman)

 

«To design an easy-to-use interface, pay attention to what users do, not what they say. Self-reported claims are unreliable, as are user speculations about future behavior.» (Jakob Nielsen)


Welcome to see the designs by Tubik Studio on Dribbble and Behance