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ios development interview

From QA to iOS Development: Life Story of the Career Switch.

Switching the career path and changing long-term ambitions is never an easy choice. Still, in many cases this step is feasible, living up the new hopes and professional growth. In the sphere of web/app design and development this sort of situation is, perhaps, even more common than in the others due to the dynamic and rocketing progress of information and communication technology in the world. New professions and positions pop up like mushrooms after the rain, opening totally new perspectives and allowing professionals to set new ambitions.

 

Our today’s story is of this kind: Tubik iOS developer Maxim Pedko will share his experience of the career switch from QA engineering and project management to iOS development. Check out the interview and get inspired!

 

iOS developer tubik studio

 

How did you make the decision on your career choice?

 

Actually, I had quite extensive and various experience: before the first step in development, I worked as a QA engineer and project manager. Still, my big dream getting stronger and stronger was to create real products by myself. One day, working over current tasks, I realized that I have to change my life and try something new that will get me closer to my ambition. I had studied the basics of PHP, web development, CMS and it even let me earn something for a living, but didn’t give me real pleasure from my work. I developed simple plugins for CMS WordPress, but I didn’t feel it like the full-scale development as the plugins were focused mainly on correction of existing design according to client’s requirement, not more. That job wasn’t bad, it was just not the one for me as I didn’t get either aesthetic or professional inspiration.

 

Why did you choose Apple as the field for your career growth?

 

I deeply and sincerely fell for iPhones and other products by Apple after their first presentation. That distant day when Steve Jobs presented a new revolutionary buttonless mobile phone with a beautiful photorealistic interface, called iPhone, they won me over with their design and usability. Since then, I have been a keen fan of Apple, although unfortunately, I didn’t have a chance to get their devices for myself. Certainly, a lot of things have changed since the presentations of the first iPhone, iOS, iPad, yet I am still the supporter of this company products and philosophy.

 

Swift vs Objective-C. Why did you choose Swift?

 

Before I started programming for iOS devices, I had analyzed the well-known and established Objective-C and newer Swift. For me, the issues to consider were the following:

  • Swift is easier readable than Objective-C
  • Swift is easier maintained and supported
  • Swift requires less amount of code
  • Interactive coding is available at Swift Sandbox
  • Swift is the platform for the future, as Apple have outlined their intent of the full switch to this programming language.

 

ios development interview

 

Where does the way of iOS developer start?

 

To start developing iOS applications, first of all, you need high motivation and wish to grow professionally. Without the great desire to self-develop and study the field in detail, it’s better not to start, moving yourself to the further search of the domain you are interested in. Starting the career in iOS development, you should be ready to some aspects that won’t let you do it from the very first day. For instance, you won’t be able to code iOS apps without a computer from Apple! You will need Xcode which works only on MacOS.

 

I have tried the software that is argued to enable developers to code for iOS on other operational systems: it took me ages to install it via virtual machines and tune the soft into more or less working condition, still it didn’t work efficiently and heavily overloaded the computer. There were even the moments when I got so frustrated that wanted to throw away my computer through the window and forget it as a nightmare. So, I had to accept the rules of the game that there’s no other way than coding for iOS on MacOS.

 

Another essential thing to mention is that to develop iOS apps you really need only Apple computer still it’s not required to buy all the existing devices like iPhones, iPads, Apple Watches etc. Xcode has simulators of all the devices with which the application will be potentially used so having developed the application for one of them, you can instantly test it on the simulator of the device.

 

ios development glossary

 

Anyway, if you have bought an Apple computer, set up Xcode and are ready to code iOS apps, you will need the reliable source of information, knowledge and practice in studying Swift. There are numerous materials on this topic shared via YouTube, such as video lessons and vlogs; also you will definitely find the text-based sources like blogs and forums for developers, but the most reliable, actual and truthful source of data for you is the official website for Apple developers.  Another useful resource is Swift website  presenting lots of tutorials and practice for studying Swift coding and I would also recommend the interactive course Developing iOS 9 Apps with Swift. No doubt, to keep up-to-date, iOS developer should never miss conferences and presentations  from Apple.

 

What are the other domains of knowledge needed in this sphere?

 

I have to admit that basic knowledge plays the vital role for professional growth in this field. Before you start to learn programming not being a native English speaker, you have to understand that without knowing English solidly you’ll get the experience when the best and the most reliable sources on not only iOS, but also programming, in general, are shut for you. That’s the reason to constantly improve and practice the language even if you think you know it well.

 

If you don’t own Apple computer working on MacOs, it’s not the reason to get in despair. You have to plan your steps and study everything that you will potentially need in the future. Before starting iOS development, I had studied operations in client-server applications, REST API, basics of OOP, databases, base operators, types of data, — everything that can be studied before starting real practice in coding on Swift.

 

Could you share your real experience that allows considering the possible risks?

 

As I’ve mentioned, to get real experience you will obviously need an Apple computer. If you don’t have it, try asking your friends or finding hubs where you’ll be able to try actual programming on Mac. It’s vital to understand if you really want to continue your professional way in the sphere as, you see, the start needs some basic capital, at least in the form of quite expensive hardware.

 

When you start getting real experience in development, don’t be afraid to start coding for real simple projects and get precious practice of both development and communication with customers. That’s important to make your name in this highly competitive sphere and open new perspectives for complex and interesting projects in the future.

 

If by any reason you are afraid of freelance platforms or frightened to be cheated, working on your own projects you should carefully plan the tasks and set the deadlines. There are many good sources where you can buy lessons or get them free, and there you are provided with the practical tasks which you are obliged to complete. You have to be persistent, try and study, be always open to new knowledge in development, — this is the only productive way to the day when you start creating efficiently working code.

 

As for me, to get the knowledge and practice of iOS development without having my own Apple computer, I did my best to get enrolled to Tubik Studio as an intern. To get more practice and have more hours of effective studying, I took the risky step having left my previous workplace and devoting the maximum of time to progress in what I saw my future. After two months the risk paid off: I got an offer of the full-time developer’s position in the iOS department. Moreover, I’ve got the precious experience of working in team of professionals that opens the door to more complex, sophisticated and significant projects, shut for freelancers working solo.

 

tubik studio developers testing

 

And my message to those who start this way is the following: it’s not enough to buy the original computer, it’s not enough to narrowly focus on one aspect of the job without studying the others. It’s vital to realize that whatever is the sphere of development you see yourself in, you should get filled with new knowledge on a daily basis, and only persistence, hard work and self-education will bring you to being a productive and highly-skilled developer.


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20 TED-talks for Designers. Inspiration Full of Thoughts.

In creative jobs, design in particular, inspiration is one of the keys to productivity. Perhaps, one of the most productive kinds of inspiration is the one taken from experts, successful people who have experienced what they share. Today we’re going to recommend you a set of interesting and informative TED-talks that we think could be interesting, useful and helpful for designers as well as other creative people! Should be said, TED is a great resource of wise and informative things to learn in diverse directions and spheres, so we never miss the chance to share our findings there.

 

Here we offer you 20 TED-talks all with the descriptions given on the TED website. Most of them are already classic, sometimes even could be called legendary, and that makes them even more precious as they have been successfully checked with the time and practice. The ability to analyze take the best from the past usually broadens the creative horizons and becomes a solid foundation from innovative thinking. We also added some prominent thoughts full of wisdom and practical experience. So, let’s move on!

 

Don Norman: 3 ways good design makes you happy

 

In this talk from 2003, design critic Don Norman turns his incisive eye toward beauty, fun, pleasure and emotion, as he looks at design that makes people happy. He names the three emotional cues that a well-designed product must hit to succeed.

 

 

Some thoughts to remember:

 

The middle level of processing is the behavioral level and that’s actually where most of our stuff gets done. Visceral is subconscious, you’re unaware of it. Behavioral is subconscious, you’re unaware of it.Almost everything we do is subconscious. I’m walking around the stage — I’m not attending to the control of my legs. I’m doing a lot; most of my talk is subconscious; it has been rehearsed and thought about a lot. Most of what we do is subconscious. Automatic behavior — skilled behavior — is subconscious, controlled by the behavioral side. And behavioral design is all about feeling in control,which includes usability, understanding — but also the feel and heft.

 

Emotion is all about acting; emotion is really about acting. It’s being safe in the world. Cognition is about understanding the world, emotion is about interpreting it — saying good, bad, safe, dangerous, and getting us ready to act, which is why the muscles tense or relax. And that’s why we can tell the emotion of somebody else — because their muscles are acting, subconsciously, except that we’ve evolved to make the facial muscles really rich with emotion.

 

 

James Patten: The best computer interface? Maybe … your hands

 

“The computer is an incredibly powerful means of creative expression,” says designer and TED Fellow James Patten. But right now, we interact with computers, mainly, by typing and tapping. In this nifty talk and demo, Patten imagines a more visceral, physical way to bring your thoughts and ideas to life in the digital world, taking the computer interface off the screen and putting it into your hands.

 

 

Some thoughts to remember:

 

And when you think about it, this makes a lot of sense, that using specialized physical objects would help people use an interface more easily. I mean, our hands and our minds are optimized to think about and interact with tangible objects.

 

Margaret Gould Stewart: How giant websites design for you (and a billion others, too)

 

Facebook’s “like” and “share” buttons are seen 22 billion times a day, making them some of the most-viewed design elements ever created. Margaret Gould Stewart, Facebook’s director of product design, outlines three rules for design at such a massive scale — one so big that the tiniest of tweaks can cause global outrage, but also so large that the subtlest of improvements can positively impact the lives of many.

 

 

Some thoughts to remember:

 

Now, the first thing that you need to know about designing at scale is that the little things really matter.

 

The next thing that you need to understand as a principle is that when you introduce change, you need to do it extraordinarily carefully. Now I often have joked that I spend almost as much time designing the introduction of change as I do the change itself, and I’m sure that we can all relate to that when something that we use a lot changes and then we have to adjust. The fact is, people can become very efficient at using bad design, and so even if the change is good for them in the long run, it’s still incredibly frustrating when it happens, and this is particularly true with user-generated content platforms,because people can rightfully claim a sense of ownership. It is, after all, their content.

 

Matthew Carter: My life in typefaces

 

Pick up a book, magazine or screen, and more than likely you’ll come across some typography designed by Matthew Carter. In this charming talk, the man behind typefaces such as Verdana, Georgia and Bell Centennial (designed just for phone books — remember them?), takes us on a spin through a career focused on the very last pixel of each letter of a font.

 

 

Some thoughts to remember:

 

You know, at times of technical innovation, designers want to be influenced by what’s in the air. We want to respond. We want to be pushed into exploring something new.

 

Aris Venetikidis: Making sense of maps

 

Map designer Aris Venetikidis is fascinated by the maps we draw in our minds as we move around a city — less like street maps, more like schematics or wiring diagrams, abstract images of relationships between places. How can we learn from these mental maps to make better real ones? As a test case, he remakes the notorious Dublin bus map. (Filmed at TEDxDublin)

 

 

Some thoughts to remember:

 

So for a successful public transport map, we should not stick to accurate representation, but design them in the way our brains work.

 

Stefan Sagmeister: Happiness by Design

 

Graphic designer Stefan Sagmeister takes the audience on a whimsical journey through moments of his life that made him happy — and notes how many of these moments have to do with good design.

 

 

Some thoughts to remember:

You know, one is: just working without pressure. Then: working concentrated, without being frazzled. Or, as Nancy said before, like really immerse oneself into it. Try not to get stuck doing the same thing — or try not get stuck behind the computer all day. This is, you know, related to it: getting out of the studio. Then, of course, trying to, you know, work on things where the content is actually important for me. And being able to enjoy the end results.

 

Tony Fadell: The first secret of design is… noticing

 

As human beings, we get used to «the way things are» really fast. But for designers, the way things are is an opportunity … Could things be better? How? In this funny, breezy talk, the man behind the iPod and the Nest thermostat shares some of his tips for noticing — and driving — change.

 

 

Some thoughts to remember:

 

Why do we get used to everyday things? Well as human beings, we have limited brain power. And so our brains encode the everyday things we do into habits so we can free up space to learn new things. It’s a process called habituation and it’s one of the most basic ways, as humans, we learn.

 

My first tip is to look broader. You see, when you’re tackling a problem, sometimes, there are a lot of steps that lead up to that problem. And sometimes, a lot of steps after it. If you can take a step back and look broader, maybe you can change some of those boxes before the problem. Maybe you can combine them. Maybe you can remove them altogether to make that better.

 

Our challenge is to wake up each day and say, «How can I experience the world better?»

 

Chris Urmson: How a driverless car sees the road

 

Statistically, the least reliable part of the car is … the driver. Chris Urmson heads up Google’s driverless car program, one of several efforts to remove humans from the driver’s seat. He talks about where his program is right now, and shares fascinating footage that shows how the car sees the road and makes autonomous decisions about what to do next.

 

 

Some thoughts to remember:

 

The better the technology gets, the less reliable the driver is going to get.So by just making the cars incrementally smarter, we’re probably not going to see the wins we really need.

 

…it’s not to say that the driver assistance systems aren’t going to be incredibly valuable. They can save a lot of lives in the interim, but to see the transformative opportunity to help someone like Steve get around, to really get to the end case in safety, to have the opportunity to change our cities and move parking out and get rid of these urban craters we call parking lots, it’s the only way to go.

 

David Carson: Design and discovery

 

Great design is a never-ending journey of discovery — for which it helps to pack a healthy sense of humor. Sociologist and surfer-turned-designer David Carson walks through a gorgeous (and often quite funny) slide deck of his work and found images.

 

 

Some thoughts to remember:

 

I’m a big believer in the emotion of design, and the message that’s sent before somebody begins to read,before they get the rest of the information; what is the emotional response they get to the product, to the story, to the painting — whatever it is.

 

Why not experiment? Why not have some fun? Why not put some of yourself into the work? And when I was teaching, I used to always ask the students, What’s the definition of a good job? And as teachers, after you get all the answers, you like to give them the correct answer. And the best one I’ve heard — I’m sure some of you have heard this —the definition of a good job is: If you could afford to — if money wasn’t an issue — would you be doing that same work? And if you would, you’ve got a great job. And if you wouldn’t, what the heck are you doing? You’re going to be dead a really long time.

 

Philippe Starck: Design and destiny

 

Designer Philippe Starck — with no pretty slides to show — spends 18 minutes reaching for the very roots of the question «Why design?» Listen carefully for one perfect mantra for all of us, genius or not.

 

 

Some thoughts to remember:

 

And here is something: nobody is obliged to be a genius, but everybody is obliged to participate.

 

With billions of people who have been born, worked, lived and died before us, these people who have worked so much, we have now bring beautiful things, beautiful gifts, we know so many things. We can say to our children, OK, done, that was our story. That passed.Now you have a duty: invent a new story. Invent a new poetry. The only rule is, we have not to have any idea about the next story. We give you white pages. Invent. We give you the best tools, the best tools, and now, do it.

 

David Kelley: Human-centered design

 

IDEO’s David Kelley says that product design has become much less about the hardware and more about the user experience. He shows video of this new, broader approach, including footage from the Prada store in New York.

 

 

Some thoughts to remember:

 

…it’s really exciting that we’re taking a more human-centered approach to design, that we’re including behaviors and personalities in the things we do, and I think this is great. Designers are more trusted and more integrated into the business strategy of companies

 

Linda Hill: How to manage for collective creativity

 

What’s the secret to unlocking the creativity hidden inside your daily work, and giving every great idea a chance? Harvard professor Linda Hill, co-author of «Collective Genius,» has studied some of the world’s most creative companies to come up with a set of tools and tactics to keep great ideas flowing — from everyone in the company, not just the designated «creatives.»

 

 

Some thoughts to remember:

 

Leading innovation is not about creating a vision, and inspiring others to execute it. But what do we mean by innovation? An innovation is anything that is both new and useful. It can be a product or service. It can be a process or a way of organizing. It can be incremental, or it can be breakthrough. We have a pretty inclusive definition.

 

Innovation is not about solo genius, it’s about collective genius.

 

What we know is, at the heart of innovation is a paradox. You have to unleash the talents and passions of many people and you have to harness them into a work that is actually useful. Innovation is a journey. It’s a type of collaborative problem solving, usually among people who have different expertise and different points of view.

 

Ken Robinson: Do schools kill creativity?

 

Sir Ken Robinson makes an entertaining and profoundly moving case for creating an education system that nurtures (rather than undermines) creativity.

 

 

Some thoughts to remember:

 

I don’t mean to say that being wrong is the same thing as being creative. What we do know is, if you’re not prepared to be wrong, you’ll never come up with anything original — if you’re not prepared to be wrong. And by the time they get to be adults, most kids have lost that capacity. They have become frightened of being wrong. And we run our companies like this. We stigmatize mistakes. And we’re now running national education systems where mistakes are the worst thing you can make. And the result is that we are educating people out of their creative capacities.

 

We know three things about intelligence. One, it’s diverse. We think about the world in all the ways that we experience it. We think visually, we think in sound, we think kinesthetically. We think in abstract terms, we think in movement. Secondly, intelligence is dynamic. If you look at the interactions of a human brain,as we heard yesterday from a number of presentations, intelligence is wonderfully interactive. The brain isn’t divided into compartments. In fact, creativity — which I define as the process of having original ideas that have value — more often than not comes about through the interaction of different disciplinary ways of seeing things.

 

Young-ha Kim: Be an artist, right now!

 

Why do we ever stop playing and creating? With charm and humor, celebrated Korean author Young-ha Kim invokes the world’s greatest artists to urge you to unleash your inner child — the artist who wanted to play forever. (Filmed at TEDxSeoul.)

 

 

Some thoughts to remember:

 

We don’t know why we should be artists, but we have many reasons why we can’t be. Why do people instantly resist the idea of associating themselves with art? Perhaps you think art is for the greatly gifted or for the thoroughly and professionally trained. And some of you may think you’ve strayed too far from art. Well you might have, but I don’t think so. This is the theme of my talk today. We are all born artists.

 

David McCandless: The beauty of data visualization

 

David McCandless turns complex data sets (like worldwide military spending, media buzz, Facebook status updates) into beautiful, simple diagrams that tease out unseen patterns and connections. Good design, he suggests, is the best way to navigate information glut — and it may just change the way we see the world.

 

 

Some thoughts to remember:

 

The eye is exquisitely sensitive to patterns in variations in color, shape and pattern. It loves them, and it calls them beautiful. It’s the language of the eye. If you combine the language of the eye with the language of the mind, which is about words and numbers and concepts, you start speaking two languages simultaneously, each enhancing the other. So, you have the eye, and then you drop in the concepts. And that whole thing — it’s two languages both working at the same time.

 

Aaron Koblin: Visualizing ourselves … with crowd-sourced data

 

Artist Aaron Koblin takes vast amounts of data — and at times vast numbers of people — and weaves them into stunning visualizations. From elegant lines tracing airline flights to landscapes of cell phone data, from a Johnny Cash video assembled from crowd-sourced drawings to the «Wilderness Downtown» video that customizes for the user, his works brilliantly explore how modern technology can make us more human.

 

 

Some thoughts to remember:

 

Our lives are being driven by data, and the presentation of that data is an opportunity for us to make some amazing interfaces that tell great stories.

 

…an interface can be a powerful narrative device. And as we collect more and more personally and socially relevant data, we have an opportunity, and maybe even an obligation, to maintain the humanity and tell some amazing stories as we explore and collaborate together.

 

Golan Levin: Art that looks back at you

 

Golan Levin, an artist and engineer, uses modern tools — robotics, new software, cognitive research — to make artworks that surprise and delight. Watch as sounds become shapes, bodies create paintings, and a curious eye looks back at the curious viewer.

 

 

Some thoughts to remember:

 

I’m an artist, and I’m really interested in expanding the vocabulary of human action, and basically empowering people through interactivity. I want people to discover themselves as actors, as creative actors, by having interactive experiences.

 

Milton Glaser: Using design to make ideas new

 

From the TED archives: The legendary graphic designer Milton Glaser dives deep into a new painting inspired by Piero della Francesca. From here, he muses on what makes a convincing poster, by breaking down an idea and making it new.

 

 

Some thoughts to remember:

 

Sometimes, in the middle of a resistant problem, I write down things that I know about it. But you can see the beginning of an idea there, because you can see the word «new» emerging from the «old.» That’s what happens. There’s a relationship between the old and the new; the new emerges from the context of the old.

 

Tim Brown: Designers — think big!

 

Tim Brown says the design profession has a bigger role to play than just creating nifty, fashionable little objects. He calls for a shift to local, collaborative, participatory «design thinking» — starting with the example of 19th-century design thinker Isambard Kingdom Brunel.

 

 

Some thoughts to remember:

 

Systems thinkers who were reinventing the world, to a priesthood of folks in black turtlenecks and designer glasses working on small things. As our industrial society matured, so design became a profession and it focused on an ever smaller canvas until it came to stand for aesthetics, image and fashion.

 

So if human need is the place to start, then design thinking rapidly moves on to learning by making. Instead of thinking about what to build, building in order to think. Now, prototypes speed up the process of innovation, because it is only when we put our ideas out into the world that we really start to understand their strengths and weaknesses. And the faster we do that, the faster our ideas evolve.

 

Richard Seymour: How beauty feels

 

A story, a work of art, a face, a designed object — how do we tell that something is beautiful? And why does it matter so much to us? Designer Richard Seymour explores our response to beauty and the surprising power of objects that exhibit it.

 

 

Some thoughts to remember:

 

Form is function. It informs, it tells us, it supplies us answers before we’ve even thought about it. And so I’ve stopped using words like «form,» and I’ve stopped using words like «function» as a designer. What I try to pursue now is the emotional functionality of things. Because if I can get that right, I can make them wonderful, and I can make them repeatedly wonderful.


 

As we can see, the set of speeches is quite diverse: some of them are giving the examples of designs, some unveil the life and routine case of famous experts, some bring general ideas on creativity and design process aspects. Anyway, they enrich us with the ideas which bring us closer to the user, to creating efficient design and taking everything possible from our natural creativity.

tubik studio freelance teamwork

Design Workstyle. Freelance vs Teamwork.

Modern time and development of technology brought people much more ways and choices of their work style and routine. The broad availability of the Internet and its endless opportunities gave lots of workers, especially in creative spheres, the chance of being more flexible and resourceful about organization of work process which is productive and convenient for all the sides. However, all the styles of work have not only their benefits but also drawbacks, and it’s really important for a professional to consider them before making the choice in favor of the particular working routine.

 

Most of the designers working in Tubik Studio have tried in practice both workstyles which are typical for today’s designers in the sphere of web, app and branding design: most started their path as freelancers before getting into team. So, using the advantage of real life experience we would like to discuss high and low sides of freelance and work in the studio or agency. Obviously, a lot of things have already been discussed in numerous articles over this topic, but, perhaps, our thoughts can also become useful for those who are considering the theme.

tubik designers

 

Freelance

 

No doubt, due to the new technological horizons couple of decades ago freelance became the new and broad perspective of organizing work routine. It opened wide opportunities for those talented people who could not leave their homes, such as for example disabled or parents of babies and toddlers. This kind of workstyle brought easy solutions for a lot of problems and let the people realize their abilities against all the odds, so very soon it was taken over and improved by huge number of professionals in different spheres. The accents moved a bit: a lot of people made the choice of freelancing not because they didn’t need to go to an office but first of all because they could work for themselves and be the only people responsible for their own decisions, choosing the partners or customers and depending on themselves. Freelance workstyle gave them the feeling of freedom.

 

Benefits

— You are free to choose the projects and customers you want or do not want to work for;

— You make your own choice of place and time of work;

— You do not depend on other people and are able to estimate your own productivity;

— You decide what kind of tools to use for any stage of the project you work on;

— You don’t spend money on transport and other costs obvious for those who work in the office;

— You control your workload and decide on the flow and priorities of projects;

— You are totally responsible for your creative decisions and are free to stop work on the project whenever you want.

 

Drawbacks

— Less (or absent) guarantees of successful payment;

— Less (or absent) guarantees of steady workload;

— No support in creative blocks and problematic issues;

— Great amount of time spent on communication with customers, which can be not only time consuming but also highly stressful);

— Work under pressure of responsibility 100% of time;

— Absence or lower amount of live communication with colleagues on regular basis;

— No financial support in cases of sickness or holidays.

 

tubikstudio designer

Studio designer Violetta as well as most other designers in the studio tried the best and the worst of freelancing

 

Responsibilities

— You are the person responsible for communication at all levels;

— You are the person of the business controlling the financial flows, income and expenses;

— You set the deadlines and have to control them by yourself;

— You work from home or any other place and should control the influence of the conditions on your productivity;

— The scope of work you can supply is limited by your personal abilities and talent;

— You have to be strong-willed and highly organized to efficiently separate your work time and personal time.

 

Bottom line

This way of work demands high level of total and absolute responsibility in case the person wants to become really successful rather than just make a living. In the sphere of design you have to become a “Jack of all trades” being able to organize efficient workplace, fast and easy communication, keeping deadlines, controlling finance and improving as a professional all at the same time.

 

Teamwork

 

Talking about design sphere, teamwork usually means that you become a part of design studio or agency. Certainly, this style of work is different from the one described above not only in terms of workflow itself but also in terms of process organization.

 

tubikstudio teamwork

 

Benefits

— In most cases a team consists of diverse professionals in design and this gives a broad space of creativity and high chances of getting involved in complex design projects;

— Work in a team has higher level of stability in workload, planning time and finances;

— In many cases it gives the faster way of successful presenting yourself as for international design community as a result of accumulated efforts of all the team members;

— Teams include not only designers but also managers who are real and important support in terms of communication with customers, including the cases of solving conflicts and misunderstandings that are unavoidable in full-time creative work; moreover, it saves your time which you are able to devote to pure creativity instead of organizational and communication issues;

— Team has a great advantage of brainstorming and collective mind that can become very supportive especially in case of creative block or complex task;

 

project management discussion

 

— Team can take big and complex design projects splitting the parts of it to the designers who are the most capable of producing final result good for all the team productivity;

— Team provides regular communication both with designers and managers which is good for self-improvement and building social relationship;

— You have clear separation of your working space and personal space which is a vital condition of personal comfort for many people;

 

tubik studio

 

— You have a feeling of somebody to back you up that can give you more confidence;

— Team has more variants of promotion and presenting its members. In case of design sphere, it is sometimes less time-consuming and faster way to get involved into the community and take the support and popularity being a part of the team;

 

tubikstudio designers

 

— The flow of information exchange and circulation is much faster and more efficient that increases the level of general team productivity and problem-solving potential;

— Team can bring good friends into your life as well as inspiration and live energy absorbed from the other people around. 

 

tubik studio designers

 

Drawbacks

— You have to organize your routine according to the schedule of work with a team whichever flexible could be the variants offered to you;

— You have to get ready to be a part of a group. That’s vital to know that even presenting yourself as a designer you are working in the team and for the team;

— You are working in a set of restrictions and in many cases you are assigned for the projects, not choosing the tasks but getting them for your consideration and accomplishment.

 

Responsibilities

— You have to be aware that you are the part of team but as well the team is the integral part of your image;

 -You are always involved in more or less active communication flow which is natural for any kind of work. That means that you should take into account interests, habits, characters and thoughts of other people around you;

 -You have to consider not only your personal interests and prospects but also the interests and prospects of the team.

 

tubik studio brainstorm

 

Bottom line

Teamwork has its own responsibilities, seems more than for frellance, although in most cases it is an illusion. Teamwork provides the chance of taking the best from delegating responsibilities between the people who are the best for the role, so a designer has more time for pure design and creative work as well as professional self-improvement not bothering so much about management and organizational issues.

 

tubik studio ceo

 

Conclusion

 

Definitely, none of the benefits or drawbacks are absolute: as all the people are different the methods of workstyle for their best productivity should also be various. No secrets or tricks, just one man’s loss is the other man’s gain. Some of us are amazing team players while the others prefer full responsibility and decision-making only on their own shoulders. None is bad or good, all those things are extremely individual.

tubik studio brainstorm

 

Inside the studio we have gathered people who are consciously keen and able to take all the advantages of teamwork. It never ever means that any of them has lost their freedom, as all people in the studio have enough of their own private space and the chances of work not being disturbed. However, this kind of freedom is always supported with all the team who are invisibly behind you and ready to back up any moment it’s needed. So, we think that teamwork organized wisely and thoughtfully doesn’t take away designers’ individual space or freedom — vise versa, it adds to it the power of solid support and prospective ways for bigger and more complex, therefore more interesting and challenging projects and tasks.


Welcome to see the designs by Tubik Studio on Dribbble and Behance

tubik studio icons design

Basic Grammar for Designers: Must and Mustn’t in Design

There are a lot of tips what designers can do and what they should avoid doing to become successful. Most of them are reasoned and really helpful, especially for beginners in the sphere. And today we have decided to enlarge this great global collection with our set of thoughts, which are separated along basic modal verbs of English — “must” and “mustn’t”. All the points mentioned below are taken from our studio experience and we have had a really great lesson of basic English grammar, discussing all those positions together.

So, let’s get started!

 

Designers must:

 

  • Learn constantly

 

There is no point on the way where being a designer you can stop learning. Sure, if you work on several projects at the same time, it’s hard to find the time for reading professional books or blogs. However, finding this time is vital for your success, otherwise, you risk losing the essence and fundamentals.

monday post

 

  • Follow the trends

 

There are loads of ways how to keep yourself up to date with the latest and freshest trends. Following blogs and social accounts of well-known and prospective design studios, exploring established design platforms like Dribbble and Behance, watching speeches by famous designers and presentations of new products in the field, communicating with other designers at various events — all of these steps can be extremely helpful in keeping your professional horizons as broad as possible.

tubik studio designers 1

 

  • Try new tools

 

It doesn’t mean that all the professional tools, soft and applications you are going to try will be useful and helpful. Moreover, it doesn’t mean that they are going to be better than the earlier ones. However, in most cases, they will provide something new enabling you to obtain new solutions, to save your time, to create new features. The more tools you try, the higher is the chance to find those which are perfect for you and your project needs.

tubik studio work

 

  • Communicate with colleagues

 

Communication with colleagues can be both real and virtual. In both cases, it matters for your professional recognition. Don’t forget that design, as well as business, is always done by people. Socializing with colleagues can end up being involved in interesting projects, recommended to potential customers or invited to speak in front of other designers. The basic aim of communication is the exchange of information and this information can be strategic for your professional growth.

brainstorm session Tubik studio

 

  • Present and share

 

As we have already mentioned in our tips for beginning designers, sharing and presentation is the way to get not only recognition but also feedback which opens new vision of your own work. It is a well-known fact that being objective and fair about your own project is quite hard, so presentation and discussion of your work with others can be very helpful. Moreover, sharing your designs at design platforms like Dribbble and Behance, your thoughts in blogs and your professional life and routine in social accounts attract your potential customers and brings home the bacon.

tubik studio case study

 

  • Use technologies they design for

 

Designer should know what is the path of a user when he uses this or that technology. When you design the application not knowing how to use a smartphone and how it differs from using a tablet, the chances to create a viable product are really low. Updating the soft and operation system of your devices plays the same important role. Creating something for users, you should be a user yourself.

tubik studio designer 1

 

  • Use social networks

 

This point combines several aims mentioned above. Using social networks not just for private, but in professional aspect gives you three important benefits: you understand how it works from user’s view and can apply this knowledge in your job; you can get a lot of information on how other designers work and communicate with them in fast and unobtrusive way; and you can present yourself and your professional abilities on the established and promoted platform with great number of users.

 

  • Keep themselves fit and healthy

 

This actually doesn’t look like a professional tip. However, your health and fitness is the basis of your success. Putting it aside, to ‘better times’, you risk losing your ability to work and that is the thing to be remembered, always. Give your eyes the break, walk around, stretch your back muscles, eat clean and find your own enjoyable way to exercise, let it be swimming, running or anything else. It may sound «out-of-business», but your business totally depends on it.

 

  • Listen to their customers

 

If you want to make design business giving you money, you should study how to satisfy customer’s needs and sell your service. So, always listen to your customer, and ask loads of questions if needed. Get into details, feel their pain, understand their targets — and they will later give you not only money, but also promotion, which is even more important.

tubik studio design1

 

  • Test as much as possible

 

Experts in usability say that it’s impossible to be fully objective about the project you work on, especially if it’s long-term. Moreover, you are not a magician turning into anyone who will use your product to understand the best way of doing anything. Therefore, creating the idea is hot enough. You should test it to grab the real practical data and improve your product.

tubik studio designer

 

  • Present themselves as personalities

 

Presenting your professional achievements in global design community is significant on the way to recognition. But if you want to make the process even more efficient, give your work the personality. Let people know, who you are, show them how you work, share your opinions, instagram some routine. Support your skills with your personality to make them both more powerful.

 

  • Organize their day

 

If you want to make design your business rather than your hobby, organization and time-management are vital. Otherwise, you will not be able to provide the customer with the efficient workflow and get lost in tasks. Set the regime, split the tasks into smaller steps with their own due-dates and don’t neglect the to-do lists. It can make you surprised with the amount of job you are able to do when your day is properly organized.

tubik studio design

 

Designers mustn’t

 

  • Look down at their customers

 

Sure, in most cases you know more or the hell much more than your customer. However, it doesn’t make you the enlighten and doesn’t give you rights to be rude and arrogant. Your task is to understand and help rather than to humiliate and self-express.

 

  • Stop learning

 

The day you think that you are the super expert and there is nothing new for you anymore is the halfway to the death of your designer career. Self-education should never stop, especially in such dynamic field as web and app design.

 

  • Ignore users’ needs

 

Designer should always remember that in most cases neither they nor their customers are the deciding voice. The users of the final product are. Therefore, ignoring their needs is going to give a product which may be awesome and highly artistic but absolutely non-viable.

 

  • Say direct “no” to customer

 

Certainly, that doesn’t mean that the customer is always right. If all the customers knew how to create their designs, they would do it themselves and designers would get extinct. But in our world and our days, your customers are people who are asking your help and what is really important they do it not for free. So, when you do not agree with the customer’s solution or you see the better ways of solving the problem, get into the issue, ask about all the details of this wish and then offer your vision in solid but polite way, reasoning every step of your solution to the problem.

 

  • Avoid communication

 

Communication is used here globally. Obviously, when you are deep into the particular project and, let’s say, work out the complex screens, you won’t be happy to get distracted just to feel that feeling of communication. Communication here means to be ready to brainstorm, to delegate the parts of the tasks in wise and open way when it’s needed for the team or project sake. Also, it happens that designers avoid communication with customers preferring just to get the task and accomplish it how they see it right. This way can lead the designer of spending a long time accomplishing the project which is absolutely different from what the customer wants and then cause long and hard hours of frustration while redesigning.

 

  • Start the project without research

 

Starting the project without preliminary research can also cost you wasted time and effort. Without investigation and exploration you will not be aware of the situation on the market, needs, and wishes of your target audience, strong and weak sides of the competition, so the risk to create something not original or not appropriate is much higher.

 

  • Forget about coding and development

 

One more thing to bear in mind is that the product designer creates is going to be coded on the next stage. Sure, most designers want to see their products alive, working, and presenting their bright skills, and if you are one of them give out the result which will be not only visual but also supported with the materials, helping developers to breathe the life into it.

 

  • Ignore competition

 

The ever-time truth of martial art is that to be prepared you should know your enemy by sight. Certainly, design is not the war field, but this law still works. And the most important benefit of exploring the competition is not to reveal or define the enemies, but to understand what is already going on in the market and analyze how to make your product stand out from the crowd of the like.

 

  • Forget about deadlines

 

If design is your hobby or you do it just for pure art, you can ignore any kind of deadlines and time restrictions. But if you want to make design your business, you should be ready to stick to deadlines and study how to manage your time. Otherwise, you risk losing the projects and perspectives just because of breaking deadlines.

 

  • Wait for the muse

 

Creative people often say that they cannot work without necessary inspiration. They are just waiting for the muse which will help them to find the best solution. Like it or hate it, but muse which doesn’t arrive on time is not the reasonable explanation of broken deadlines or inappropriate result. Therefore, if you want to have the serious name and get respected by the clients, if you want to have a constant flow of projects and earn more and more, find the ways to call your muse when you need it, not waiting when it wants to come. By the way, the process of research and sketching for the project is one of the great ways. Appetite comes with eating, muse comes with working.


Welcome to see the designs by Tubik Studio on Dribbble and Behance