Tag Archives: tubik

UI research web and app design tubik

User Research. Empathy Is the Best UX Policy.

Starting any project, which is not their personal presentation but a product for users, designers should be deeply aware: they work primarily not for self-expression, not for showing their creativity to the world, not for creating something revolutionary new that will make the world go round in opposite direction. They work to solve users’ problems, satisfy their wishes and achieve business goals.

 

That is why it’s vital to establish who the potential users of the future product are and which their wishes and needs could be met. This is the time when the designer turns into the researcher to get as much information as possible and analyze it for the sake of user-friendly solutions in design and interactions. In our earlier articles, we have already mentioned the significant role of user research in creating problem-solving user-friendly designs, and today we suggest getting deeper into its definition, methods, techniques and benefits in the process of creating a digital product.

 

web design tubik studio

 

What is user research?

 

Generally, the word «research», being quite universal for the diverse spheres of professional activities, roots into the Old French word recercher meaning «seek out, search closely»; first, it was the verb and later transformed into the noun of the same semantics. The modern definition of the noun according to Cambridge Dictionary state the meaning as «a detailed study of a subject, especially in order to discover (new) information or reach a (new) understanding». This sort of activity is widely applied in a variety of sciences and practical fields, including informational architecture and user experience design.

 

Basically, user research is the comprehensive and multilayered activity whose aim is to collect information about the potential target audience of the product. Via a number of techniques, user researchers collect and then analyze the information obtained from real users, and this outcome usually allows the design team to work on the optimal solutions which will make the product user-friendly and attractive.

 

Therefore, user research means getting deeper into details of core target audience to understand their preferences and psychological peculiarities, the influence of different factors like colors, stylistic decisions, and logic of interaction on emotions and experience of the defined group, the sources of information and creative performance ways which could engage users and make them active. On this basis, visual design presumes to create the original and recognizable style that will make the product stand out of the crowd and draw potential customer’s attention.

 

User research is actually the way by which designer is able to step into the shoes of the user and go along his or her path feeling all the stones on the way. This is the way to create designs based on empathy — the ability to place yourself onto the place of the other person, to feel what they are feeling and see what they are seeing. This precious ability enables designers to create things which not only work well and look good but also do what the particular users need them to do.

 

web development

 

Why is user research needed?

 

Famous guru of advertising David Ogilvy emphasized the great importance of research for creating effective result: «Advertising people who ignore research are as dangerous as generals who ignore decodes of enemy signals.» Time has changed the means, goals and technologies, still, the vital role of research established even stronger. Neglecting the research stage and relying only on their creative intuition, experience and talent, designers risk failing this task as they will not know the conditions of the app functioning and will not be able to make it efficient, user-friendly and original.

 

As we mentioned before, designers who start creating a product just at once when they get the task are quite risky guys. There are plenty of things to do before the designing process itself. Ignoring those things can give the interesting but not viable result. It’s important to analyze the competition, to understand the target market, to find out the sources of traffic and potential expectations of the users before setting off. Otherwise, you can waste much more time on loads of inefficient variants.

 

Toonie Alarm UI design

 

When is user research applied?

 

Describing the typical stages of product creation process here in Tubik, we have mentioned the set of the following stages: setting the task and initial scope of works; estimation; user/market research; UX wireframing; prototyping; UI design; animation; software architecture planning; development; testing; release; updates. Still, it doesn’t mean that all these stages go one-by-one in this order — some of them are interconnected and some of them are spread around the whole creative process. User research is applied at several different levels of creation, somehow changing the perspective and the goals on the data which should be obtained and analyzed.

 

We would mark out three typical stages when user research is a must-do essential for creating the efficient design.

 

Pre-design research: this is actually the initial stage of the creative process when designer working over the project is exploring the requirements of the stakeholders and collects the maximum information about the target audience.  As well as in a scientific project, the scientist collects and analyzes the heritage of the previous specialists involved in the sphere to make the product actual, the UX designer needs to do the same to offer the solutions correspondent to what users need and want.  This is the time to talk, read and analyze a lot. This is when the designer needs to dive into psychology and behavior, together with the stakeholder set the goals of the product and investigate the factors which influence choices in this domain. Certainly, with every next project and each next dose of experience, the designer can get accustomed to user research techniques and needs less time for them. However, there never comes the day when the designer doesn’t need any time for research as long as every project has its unique requirements and its own USP which should be enlightened by design.

 

In-process research: it is applied at different stages of the actual design process when, having the chances to interact with users, discuss their wishes, watch their behavior and analyze the problems they have, designers explore the offered solutions in action and on that basis can alter some positions of their research and add more efficiency to the user interfaces.

 

Real product research: this is the another level of research applied to actually existing digital product users operate with. Applying various techniques of user testing, designers collect actual experience, analyze it and make improvements in terms of real cases of the product usage in different environments and conditions.

 

UI design Upper App

 

What are the dimensions of user research?

 

Certainly, there are numerous approaches to the process of research. Among them, we would like to draw your attention to the dimensions outlined by Nielsen Norman Group, highly experienced in the domain of research and analysis and regularly sharing their findings in this sphere. They offer to view the methods of user research along a 3-dimensional framework with the following axes:

  • Attitudinal vs. Behavioral
  • Qualitative vs. Quantitative
  • Context of Use

ux-landscape-questions

 

As we can see from the scheme, attitude is what people say while behavior is what people do. In real life, they are often different things and aspects, due to numerous reasons like individual traits of character, temper, education level, age, gender, beliefs and so on. Another opposition presents qualitative analysis, which is usually measured by definite numbers (like «how many clicks the user makes before accomplishing the payment») and qualitative analysis («why user can leave the page without registration and how this problem could be fixed»). And the context of use analyzes all the additional factors which can influence the outcome of interaction with the product, for example, is the user goes along the preliminary given script or interaction is full improvisation.

 

Analyzing the data in terms of different dimensions, designers are able to take the comprehensive outcome enabling to make solid decisions about the interactions and visual performance.

 

What are the methods of user research?

 

Today, user experience design has already grown into a sphere with the considerable background of project and research cases, which have resulted in the extensive set of different research methods. Some methods are used on a regular basis, some are more rare and specific, yet it’s good for designers to be aware of a variety of them. Let’s briefly review the popular ones.

 

Interviews. Perhaps the most widely spread method when, having set the target audience of the product, people involved into the creative process interact directly with potential users and ask them questions to collect information. The quality of questions is the issue of high importance here. It’s effective to apply both close (yes/no) and open (giving the detailed answer) questions to let users provide diverse information.

 

Personas. The technique which has been applied in marketing and sales for a long time with client/buyer personas and now has transformed into a new perspective of user personas. With this technique, designer collects the data about the potential target audience, its psychological and behavioral preferences and habits and creates a bunch of imaginary users with these characteristic. On the ground of this data, the designer models users’ interactions with the product and possible issues that can arise in the process.

 

Sorting cards. This technique is effectively applied in cases when designers deal with the products presenting complex interfaces and variety of diverse content. The users are asked to categorize the content and set the hierarchies. In this way, the designers obtain the data showing how users see this sort of content and what way of its organization would be efficient for quick and easy navigation around the app or website.

 

Surveys. Another traditional method of scientific and social explorations when users are offered the set of questions. Answering them, users give the actual information enabling designers to understand their preferences and wishes deeper.

 

Focus group. Popular method presenting the moderated discussion of the product, its features, benefits and drawbacks within the group of people potentially close to the target audience. Altering some characteristics of the group, for example, age, gender, education level, tech literacy, researchers can receive the variety of data and see how these features can influence user behavior.

 

Task analysis. The method exploring the tasks and goals which users have interacting with the product. Understanding what users want to do enables designer to consider the fast and effective ways to achieve these goals.

 

Eyetracking. Special devices enable the designer to review which zones of the website or app users interact with more actively and use these zones in the most efficient and informative way.

 

Participatory design. Users are offered the set of elements for the layout and can suggest their own vision of the construction.

 

Clickstream testing. The analysis of the most clickable parts of the layout with the aim of designing clear interactions and reveal the problems.

 

A/B Testing. The users deal with one variant of design (version A) for some time and then another variant (version B) while the researcher collects the information along the necessary metrics and makes the conclusion about the efficiency of the versions.

 

Daily Reports. The user is asked to interact with a product for a particular period providing the reports on a daily basis. This helps to check the usability of the product in the perspective of long-term use.

 

Desirability testing. The users are usually offered visually and stylistically different versions and provide the feedback which version they would prefer and why.

 

design navigation UI UX tubik studio

 

What are the important points to consider in user research?

 

Collecting the data about user behavior and preferences via diverse methods and techniques, the designer has to take into account the following factors:

 

— the environment of use (the factors of using the product indoors or outdoors, the level of light, noise, available time and tons of other things can have an impact on design solutions)

— factors of intrinsic motivation (the internal personal stimuli moving the person to act)

— factors of extrinsic motivation (the outer factors of getting a reward or avoiding punishment that encourage people’s behavior)

— longevity of the product (based on the period for which the product is planned for use: if it grows together with the user or is applicable only in a particular age).

 

It’s should be remembered that removing the mistakes in design, even if its already high-fidelity level, is faster, cheaper and less painful for users than fixing negative issues with already launched and operating product.

 

The bottom line is simple. Don’t be lazy to research vital points of the project before you start designing. Don’t fancy doing the research? No problem, go to duck and dive in loads of baseless concepts instead of going along the solid path of understanding the user’s needs and wishes. Just don’t forget: it’s not you who decides that the product is successful, it’s not even other designers or stakeholders. It’s users. So, empathy is the best policy.

 

Recommended reading

 

Here are some articles we recommend for those who would like to get deeper into the topic:

 

Complete Beginner’s Guide to UX Research

 

When to Use Which User-Experience Research Methods

 

User Research Basics

 

Pareto Principle-Based User Research

 

How To Conduct User Experience Research Like A Professional

 

Open-Ended vs. Closed-Ended Questions in User Research

 


Welcome to see the designs by Tubik Studio on Dribbble and Behance

Bakery website design case study tubik

Case Study: Vinny’s Bakery. UI Design for E-Commerce.

Design for e-commerce platforms is a special field of knowledge and practice. On the one hand, there are more and more users with an average or high level of tech literacy, who trust this way of shopping and are open to buying online. On the other hand, the level of competition in the field is also becoming more diverse and comprehensive with the constantly increasing number of services and platforms for selling and buying via the Internet. 

 

In one of the chapters of our e-book «Design for Business», the success of e-commerce activity depends on several factors among which:

 

— the quality of the product or service offered

— the quality of the content presenting the offer to customers

— the quality of design for the electronic platform — website and/or mobile application — via which the sales are going to be delivered.

 

So, it’s easy to see that UI/UX design for digital products of this kind plays the vital role. Thoroughly thought-out logic and transitions, simple and clear microinteractions, fast feedback from the system, attractive product presentation, easy payment flow and plenty of other details and features can directly influence increasing profits for the business involved in such a popular e-commerce game. This is the field where designers and business experts can work as one team for good of everyone, first of all of the target user.

 

Today’s case study is all about this theme: it presents the UI concept for Vinny’s Bakery website. 

 

tubik studio landing page design

 

Task

 

UI/UX design of a website for a small elite bakery selling fresh hand-made bread.

 

Process

 

Designing e-commerce website or mobile app, designers should definitely consider the following aspects:

 

  • operational simplicity
  • strong branding
  • security of users’ data
  • effective use of visual elements
  • clear data presentation via menus, catalogs etc.
  • user’s ability to leave feedback about goods and services
  • easily available general and contact information about the business providing goods or services
  • design that supports the offer not overshadowing it.

 

Grounded on these general principles, Tubik designer Ernest Asanov studied the trends on the market and analyzed the potential target audience of customers who would actually buy the goods, not just watched the offers. On the basis of the obtained data, in UI design he followed the philosophy of minimalism which is user-friendly, attractive and informative.

 

tubik_studio_website_ui_bakery

 

The website promotes a small bakery selling homemade bread. The home page presents the service, providing the links giving more information about the company and the items it offers as well as links to social accounts. The designer was keen to activate different techniques of visual perception via headline, images, background and copy block so that users could get the basic information immediately and got the warm feeling of freshly baked bread. On the basis of the design solutions, it is easy to assume that this is the service positioning itself as a producer and seller of upmarket products which are exclusively hand-made and presumably because of that reason cost higher than average bread in the supermarket. Harmony is the style provided by the webpage: dark background, branding element as a central element of a header, strong and clear headline establishing positive emotional message, visual elements enabling immediate perception of the theme and setting strong visual association with tasty pastry, short text block describing basic benefits of the product and clear visible call to action.

 

Bakery website catalog design ui

 

The next webpage to look at is the catalog of the offered products: again, it supports the user with the prominent and high-quality photos of actual products with brief core information on every position. Users can also quickly review the rating of every item and its price. Horizontal scroll is applied for seeing more positions, that’s why the last item is shown not in a full view to let the user see that this is the direction of scrolling. Call-to-action button, via which the user can add the item to the cart, is designed with a different color comparing to all the other elements of the interface, and this technique allows making CTA prominent and seen immediately. Such an interface lets users add goods right from the catalog without the necessity to go to the page of this particular position. It’s a user-friendly way to go, especially for loyal customers who know well the quality and tastes of the presented bread and wouldn’t like to spend their time on additional transitions just to put the item into their cart. Still, if the user wants to know more about the particular item, it’s easy to do by just clicking or tapping on it in the list.

 

bakery website product page ui

 

Clicking on a particular item, users get the access to more detailed information about the bakery item, including the description, weight of the pack, nutritional rates, rating, price and CTA button. The photo of the item remains the only pictorial element of visual support which makes the interface concise and non-distracting. 

 

Bakery website animation

 

Here you can see the full set of the transitions: you can see that header and footer are fixed, the horizontal scrolling opens more positions in the catalog and strengthens the feeling of the minimalistic and focused interface. The interactions are supported with smooth and unobtrusive animation making the interface even more stylish via the imitation of interaction with physical objects in the real world.

 

Another aspect to mention generally about this web design concept is typography which presented on more object of the thorough creative search for the designer and resulted in the combination of fonts, that are effectively contrast and easily readable. Color applied for headings presented in bold and prominent font and applying uppercase letters echoes the color typical for the freshly baked bread, while the color of copy blocks sets the visual association with the flour on the baker’s table — the element which is used on the background imitating the cooking worktop. Therefore, all those elements get visually connected to each other and present the web interface which looks harmonic and consistent. These are the feelings playing the significant role in building up the positive user experience and attracting buyers to use the service again and again.

 

designers tubik teamwork

 

No doubt, new day will bring fresh challenges which will result in practical case studies for Tubik Blog readers. Stay tuned, have a tasty day and don’t miss the new posts!


Welcome to see the designs by Tubik Studio on Dribbble and Behance

psychology of design article tubik blog

Psychology in Design. Principles Helping to Understand Users.

Some people are used to thinking of design as a purely artistic job but there is much more standing behind it. The sense of beauty and inspiration are not enough to create the proficient design. That’s why designers should possess certain knowledge and skills of distinct sciences to do their job right. And it’s not only the art of design, it’s also about various fields of knowledge and practice which help them work efficiently and productively. One of the basic studies helping designers to understand users is psychology. Today, we will figure out what a big part psychology plays in design and what psychological principles are essential to remember during the design process.

 

tubikstudio ted-talks collection

 

The role of psychology in design

 

Today the tendency of user-centered design makes designers reconsider approach to their work and go deeper into the understanding of the target audience. Donald A. Norman in his book “The Design of Everyday Things” defines design as an act of communication, which means having the deep understanding of the person with whom the designer is communicating. In order to get better insight into people’s needs, designers are recommended to bear in mind the psychological principles of human behavior, aspirations and motivations.

 

The outcome of the work can be even more positive if a designer applies psychology in the creative process since the science gives the close understanding of the target audience. Psychology knowledge helps to create the design which will make users perform the actions they are expected to such as making a purchase or contacting the team.

 

Designers may see psychology as a complicated approach to improving the design and for that reason neglect this part of research and analysis. However, you don’t need to be a Ph.D. in psychology to use it at your work effectively. All you need to consider are the basic principles constantly presented in design. Based on our experience and the conducted research, we’ve defined six effective psychological principles often applied in the design process.

 

tubik studio quote collection

 

Gestalt Principles

 

This psychological theory is almost 100-year-old but it hasn’t lost its actuality. The word “gestalt” means «unified whole» so the theory explores users’ visual perception of elements in relation to each other. In other words, it shows how people tend to unify the visual elements into groups. The principles, on which users form the groups, include:

 

Similarity. If a user sees objects that look somehow similar, they may automatically perceive them as the individual elements of one group. The similarity between elements is usually defined with shape, color, size, texture or value. The similarity gives users the sense of coherence between the design elements.

 

Continuation. It is the principle according to which the human eye moves naturally from one object to the other. This often happens through the creation of curved lines allowing the eye to flow with the line.

 

Closure. It is a technique based on the human eye’s tendency to see closed shapes. Closure works where an object is incomplete but the user perceives it as a full shape by filling in the missing parts.

 

Proximity. When objects are placed in close proximity, the eye perceives them as a group rather than seen individually even if they aren’t similar.

 

Figure/Ground. This principle demonstrates the eye’s tendency to separate objects from their background. There are lots of examples of pictures that shows two faces depending on where your eye is focused the object or background.

 

website design for photographers

Photography Workshops  website

 

The Gestalt principles confirm in practice that our brain tends to make tricks with us, so designers should consider that fact during the creation process to exclude the possibility of misunderstandings.

 

Visceral Reactions

 

Have you ever had that feeling when you fall in love with the website after the first second when you’ve opened it? Or maybe an application has made you sick only with the quick glance at it? If yes, then you’ve already known what’s a visceral reaction. This kind of reactions comes from the part of our head called “old brain” responsible for the instincts and it reacts much faster than our consciousness does. Visceral reactions are rooted in our DNA, so they can be easily predicted.

 

How do designers use this knowledge? They aim at creating a positive aesthetic impression with the design. It’s not that difficult to guess what looks nice to people and what doesn’t if you know your target audience and their needs. So, the tendency of using the high-resolution beautiful photos or the colorful pictures at landing pages, websites or any other web and mobile products is not accidental.

 

jewellery_e-commerce_app_concept_by_tubik

Jewelry E-commerce Application

 

Psychology of Colors

 

A science studying the influence of colors on the human’s mind, behavior, and reactions is called the psychology of colors. Today we won’t go deep into the aspects of this study since it is complex so deserves to have a specialized post devoted to it (on which, besides, we’re already working). In a few words, the main idea of the study is that the colors have a great impact on the users’ perception. That’s why designers should choose the colors knowingly to make sure their work presents the right message and tune.

 

Here is the list of the basic colors and the meanings which they are typically associated with:

Red. The color usually associates with passionate, strong, or aggressive feelings. It symbolizes both good and bad feelings including love, confidence, passion and anger.

Orange. An energetic and warm color bringing the feelings of excitement.

Yellow. This is the color of happiness. It symbolizes the sunlight, joy and warmth.

Green. The color of nature. It brings calming and renewing feelings. Also, may signify inexperience.

Blue. It often represents some corporate images. It usually shows calm feelings but as a cool color it also associates with distance and sadness.

Purple. Long associated with royalty and wealth since many kings wore purple clothes. It’s also a color of a mystery and magic.

Black. The color has a great number of the meanings. It associates with a tragedy and death. It signifies a mystery. It can be traditional and modern. Everything depends on how you employ it and which colors go with it.

White. The color means purity and innocence, as well as wholeness and clarity.

 

tubik studio web UI design

Slopes Website

 

Recognition Patterns

 

You may have noticed that website or applications united with one theme usually have common patterns in their design. The reason is the users’ psychology. The thing is that people visiting a website or using an application are expecting to see certain things associated with the definite kind of product.

 

For example, visiting a website of a barbershop, the users are not expecting to see bright colors or pictures with cats or anything like this because if they do see it, this will definitely make them think of a website as an untrustworthy resource.

 

However, not only the colors and pictures matter. Some obvious and common things such as a list of blog posts on the front page of a blog or the filters in the e-commerce website are also important for successful navigation. Users become accustomed to things quickly and their absence makes them feel uncomfortable.

 

todo list UI app tubik studio

To-do list concept

 

Scanning Patterns

 

In our article Tips on Applying Copy Content in User Interfaces, we’ve already mentioned that before reading a web page, people scan it to get a sense of whether they are interested. According to different studies, including the publications by Nielsen Norman Group, UXPin team and others, there are several popular scanning patterns for web pages, among which “F” and “Z” patterns.

 

F-pattern is referred to as the most common eye-scanning pattern, especially for web pages with the big amount of content. A user first scans a horizontal line on the top of the screen, then moves down the page a bit and reads along the horizontal line which usually covers a shorter area. And the last one is a vertical line down on the left side of the copy where they look for keywords in the initial sentences of the paragraphs. It usually occurs on text-heavy pages like blogs, news platforms, thematic editorials etc.

 

Z-pattern is applied to pages which are not so heavily concentrated on the copy. A user first scans across the top of the page starting from the top left corner, looking for important information, and then goes down to the opposite corner at a diagonal, finishing with the horizontal line at the bottom of the page, again from left to right. This is a typical model of scanning for landing pages or websites not loaded with copy and not requiring scrolling down the page, which means that all the core data is visible in the pre-scroll area.

 

Knowing these patterns, designers can place the elements in an effective way for users’ perception and help them perform expected actions.

 

Hick’s Law

 

The law states that the more options users are exposed to, the longer it takes them to make a decision. This means that the more options you give to users, be it products to choose or pictures to look at, the more time and energy it takes to make a decision about the next step of interaction. The possible result here is that the users make the choices but get unpleasant feelings after using the product, or in the worst case, they may not want to take such a significant effort and just leave.

 

That’s why designers are recommended to keep any options including buttons, pictures, pages to a minimum. Removing unnecessary choices, you make the usability of the product more effective.

 

ui animation cafe app tubikstudio

Cafe Coupon App

 

Psychology is an effective tool in design which makes the creative process more productive while the result is going to be more user-centered. We’ve told you about six useful principles but they are only the tip of the iceberg because there is much more to learn on the topic. Don’t miss our next blog posts continuing this useful theme!

 

Recommended reading:

 

Here are some more articles we could recommend for those who would like to get deeper into the topic:

 

Gestalt principles

 

The role of psychology as a design tool

 

5 psychology rules every UX designer must know

 

Emotional Design: Why We Love (or Hate) Everyday Things by Don Norman

 

The 5 pillars of visual hierarchy in Web design

 

6 principles of visual hierarchy for designers

 

On Visual Hierarchy

 

F-Shaped Pattern For Reading Web Content


Welcome to see the designs by Tubik Studio on Dribbble and Behance

upper app UI design case study

Case Study: Upper App. Coding UI Animation.

No doubt, animation of interfaces still belongs to the most debatable issues between designers and developers. Animated UI elements often set the challenge to developers, so to enhance usability of an app or a website, the motion should be grounded on user research and add its two cents to the positive user experience. Developers in Tubik are open to this sort challenges: earlier we have already shown the case on coding motion for Toonie Alarm, this time we are continuing the theme with a practical case of developing animated interactions for Upper App.

 

Back to Basics: Core Animation and UIViewPropertyAnimator

 

Supporting designers and developers in creating attractive and functional interfaces for iOS apps, in 2006 Apple presented Core Animation, a system for animating views and UI elements of the app. Basically, it is a graphics compositing framework used by MacOS, iOS, watchOS, and tvOS to produce user interfaces with motion. It is not a replacement for the app views: instead, it is a technology that integrates with views to provide support for animating their content. However, the animation is not the only part of this framework: Core Animation presents the infrastructure for compositing and manipulating visual content. The framework uses GPU to accelerate rendering screen objects. Core Animation divides the visual content into individual objects that are called layers and arranges them in a tree hierarchy known as the layer tree.

 

The fundamental class that represents these layout objects is the CALayer class. It looks similar to UIViews implementation. The CALayer class manages image-based content and allows performing animations on that content. The main task of the layer is to manage the visual content but it also has visual attributes that can be set such as a background color, border, and shadow. In addition to managing visual content, the layer maintains information about the geometry of its content (such as position, size, and transform) used to present it on the screen. Modifying the properties of the layer is the way to initiate animations on the layer content or geometry. The app runs an animation. Layout, Display, Prepare and Commit phases are performed once before the animation starts. At this time the model layer is updated. The animation itself is rendered in a separate process on the render server using the presentation layer.

 

iOS animation

 

Nevertheless, whenever developers would like to interact with the animation (for example, pause or restart), it most likely leads to a huge piece of work. iOS open source community offers 3rd party (HTML, CSS, JavaScript) frameworks that can take care of this problem, like Pop, Interpolate and other.

 

iOS 10 provides a new way to animate that is UIViewPropertyAnimator. UIViewPropertyAnimator was presented in 2016 and it provides more extensive functionality on operations with animated interfaces. Vital to mention, it can be accessed only via iOS 10+ and tvOS 10+. The class allows developers to animate changes to views and dynamically modify the animations before they finish. This means programmers can stop (pause) in-progress animation, restart it at a later date if they wish and even dynamically modify the animated properties, for example, change the animation end-point to the top-right of the screen when it was previously the bottom-left. Developers can simply call the startAnimation() function on this instance to start the animation or animations. Anything that can be animated by the previous UIView API is eligible to be used in a UIViewPropertyAnimator instance. Here are its options:

 

  • Frame
  • Bounds
  • Center
  • Alpha
  • Background color
  • Transform (as long as it is a transformation in the 2D space, for 3D only with CoreAnimation)

 

UIViewPropertyAnimator gives programmatic control over the timing and execution of the animations. Let’s sum up what are the core differences of UIViewPropertyAnimator from CAAnimation:
 

1. After the creation of the UIViewPropertyAnimator object, the object of CAAnimation isn’t created for the layer;

2. After starting UIViewPropertyAnimator (by calling method startAnimation()) CAAnimation is created and added to the layer for animated UIView

3. Animation exists until it’s completed or deleted

 

The big advantage of  UIViewPropertyAnimator is that it’s new and has been created on the basis of modern requirements and needs, taking into account the specific features of Swift.

 

runningPropertyAnimator

 

The comment in the API informs that Apple Company pushes this class as the default for creating animations on UIView. At the moment, it is recommended for creating animations in UIKit and it’s going to replace the methods UIView.animate(withDuration:)

 

Practical cases

 

Here is a simple example of using UIViewPropertyAnimator in practical case:

 

ball UI animation

 

 

 

For comparison, here’s an example of code for the same animation, but accomplished with CoreAnimation framework:  

 

 

Now let’s look closer how animation was created with UIViewPropertyAnimator for Upper App application, a simple and elegant to-do list for iPhones: here we present the case of interactions with the menu.

 

Sample 1

 

upper app ui animation development

 

 

Sample 2

 upper app ui animation development  

 

 

UIViewPropertyAnimaton is really helpful in the process of iOS development: it simplifies the way for creating quite complex animations saving time and effort. Keep and eye on new posts: they will present fresh practical cases.


Welcome to download Upper App via App Store

Welcome to read more articles on iOS and web development

upper app UI design case study

Case Study: Upper App. UI Design for To-Do List.

Famous author and motivational speaker Zig Ziglar once said: «You were born to win, but to be a winner, you must plan to win, prepare to win, and expect to win.» Planning our day and managing our tasks is the significant job we have to do regularly and devotedly in case we seek for success. Tons of books, articles and interviews from successful and productive people generally send the global message: to be productive you have to plan your day and tasks distributing your time and effort wisely. 

 

Would you like to have a reliable helping hand in the process of planning your days and setting goals effectively and without any distractions? Welcome to try Upper, simple and elegant free application for iPhones, designed and developed by Tubik team. Today this motivating to-do list is featured and spinning up at Product Hunt, so we’ve also decided to unveil some details of design and functionality with our readers.

 

Upper App to-do list tubik

 

Task

 

Full-cycle UI/UX design for the simple and motivational productivity app for iPhones.

 

Process

 

Creating the to-do list application, Tubik team realized the high scale of competition in this sphere of utilities: that was a step into the red ocean. Still, as it usually happens in the fields covering wide and diverse target audience, a variety of the products is another user-friendly feature: it allows choosing the styles and features every particular user likes. Continuing the theme of personal productivity, which was started with our previous app Toonie Alarm, we’ve established the goal to present the app of totally different look and functionality deeply focused on personal and professional motivation.

 

 upper app UI design

 

In UX perspective, the app interface was concentrated on extremely simple interactions and intuitive navigation, while in UI design the core concerns gathered around high readability level and visual hierarchy that would allow users to use the app easily in any environment and on the go. In addition, working over the visual performance of the app user interface, Tubik designer Ernest Asanov made a general stylistic concept choice in favor of minimalist and elegant solutions.

 

Functionality

 

The basic idea set behind Upper was creating helpful to-do list, deeply concentrating user’s attention on the tasks and deadline. That’s why it doesn’t include complex functionality, distractions or decorations. It presents only the features and elements needed for time and task management.

 

Functions and features provide the following:

  • All the features of the app are free for everyone
  • Upper Streak Challenge motivate users to complete all the tasks for the day
  • Statistics of tasks completion
  • Simple and clear navigation
  • Easy adding, deleting and marking tasks
  • Eye-pleasing slight animation
  • Instant sharing achievements with friends

 

upper app UI design case study

 

Design and Layout

 

Interactions: The basic functionality of the app is built around user’s ability to create the list of tasks which can be saved for the particular date and time, easily deleted or marked complete. In addition, Upper analyzes task completion progress and shows stats to keep users updated and motivated. The absence of distractions, simple screen design and thought-out typography make the content highly readable and allow using the app easily in any environment and on-the-go.

 

upper app UI design case study

 

Basic functional buttons are placed in the bottom of the screen, which supports usability for users with big devices. Different swipe gestures allow a user to mark the task complete or delete it from the list. Core information such as dates, the words for the closest days (tomorrow, today), the number of tasks and days in Upper Streak are presented in uppercase font, supporting both efficient visual hierarchy of the layout elements and the harmonic consistency in combination with the product brand name.

 

Upper App to-do list 7

 

Upper Streak: The original feature of Upper App is user motivation with special challenge of non-breaking plans and increasing productivity potential: the app motivates to complete all the planned tasks via Upper Streak Challenge. Streak is the period during which users don’t interrupt completing the tasks with Upper: it shows the achievement in being consistent and productive and encourages not to stop and break the progress. Seeing your determination, the app will challenge you with bigger number of tasks, so users are motivated to get organized and complete the plans with Upper without missing a day.

 

upper app UI design case study

 

Color and style: The app is designed in minimalist and elegant style of layout based deeply on quick functionality and intuitive navigation. What is more, users are provided with the variety of skins and can choose between dark, light and red skin depending on their personal taste and wishes. At the moment the app is presented in dark skin, but next update coming very soon will let users activate any of the three palettes.

 

upper app UI design case study

 

User-friendly navigation, supported with slight eye-pleasing animation, will help users to focus on their tasks.  No ads, no complications, no extra copy, interface motivating to create short concise notes for the tasks – nothing will distract from the goals. Application provides the simple calendar, allows saving notes conveniently, check stats and plan anything from everyday stuff to business objectives.

 

upper app UI design case study

 

To get more information on design and interactions, you can also review the full presentation of Upper App design or check full pack of the details via Upper Press Kit


Welcome to see full presentation on Product Hunt

Welcome to download Upper App via App Store

Welcome to see the designs by Tubik Studio on Dribbble and Behance

health care app calendar tubik

Case Study: Health Care App. UI for Doctors.

One of the life aspects whose importance is never faded or lost in any country is the issue of healthcare. This is the factor having, perhaps, the biggest impact on not only personal and professional life of an individual, but also general productivity and welfare of the whole country. With the rapid growth of technology, it would be irrational not to apply the great potential of modern innovation in the sphere of health care and medical services. Recent years have shown increasing interest of professionals and stakeholders in setting creative experiments and searching for new innovative solutions helping doctors to take the advantage of technology in saving lives, enhancing and speeding up health care. As a result of this massive concern, the bunch of apps and websites useful for doctors and patients have already come into play, and the field is still actively progressing. The role of design is literally vital here, in many cases providing real support in the matters of life and death.

 

Our today’s case study is devoted to this vitally actual theme and presents the design concept of the web application for doctors called HealthCare App. Having explored the specific nature of this type of digital products, Tubik designer Eugene Cameel thought over the solutions concentrated on fast and intuitive interaction for making communication between a doctor and a patient easy and fast while saving and looking for the data optimized and organized. Let’s look at the details of the concept closer.

 

tubik studio designer ux

 

Task

UI/UX design of a web application for doctors

 

Process

UX Wireframing

 

As we mentioned in our recent article about UX wireframing, this initial part of creative process lays the foundation of future functionality before the aspects of visual performance and style are approached. Work over wireframes is based on definition and analysis of the target audience and its potential pains which the future product is going to solve. The target audience of HealthCare App was primarily doctors and the key objective of the product was set as optimization of huge amount of data which doctors deal with on a regular basis. Every single piece of information about every patient is vital for making the right decision, so creating the interface, the designer was focused on making it organized, clear and easy-to-use. Intuitive navigation was set as the biggest priority to make the app applicable even for people with low or medium level of tech literacy.

 

Basically,  the app provides doctors with the functionality of saving and organizing data about patients with the ability to find it quickly in database when it’s needed. Also, doctor’s can plan and save appointments in the calendar as well as the history of medical examinations for patients under supervision. Application also saves history of diagnoses, prescribed medicines, personal data and complex medication plans with marking the stages. Another useful feature is that the users of the app get the access to the stats and explorations on different issues at different level of coverage, from local to general statistics and recommendations by WHO.

 

Let’s check UX solutions for three basic screens presenting appointments, calendar and statistics.

health care app UX design

 

The app features the sidebar with five tabs located on the left side of the screen and the header featuring the title of the information field (calendar, appointments etc.), the current date and search field, well-seen and easily accessible in case any data should be found quickly. The main field of the Calendar screen presented below organizes data about all the appointments in three modes along the period of time reviewed — month, week and day, switched via top menu. This part also gives particular dates shown on the screen. All the data is organized in special cards while the timeline located on the left lets to catch the timing. The user can review all the planned appointments or things to do, getting more extensive data after tapping the necessary tab, or add new appointments to the free spaces in the schedule. In preview, notes show the full name of the patient, time of the planned appointment and mark of the visit nature (urgent, follow-up therapy etc.)

 

health care UX calendar

 

The screen of a particular appointment shows the dynamic head menu which can be scrolled horizontally and presents the list of patients. Then lower we can see the tab presenting detailed information about the current patient, who is being examined, including name, gender, doctor’s name, ID number, address and contacts. The biggest interactive field on the page shows three basic categories to organize data: medical background, lab results, insurance and charges.

 

tubik health care app UX

 

The third screen shows various stats which can be useful for the doctor in exploration a particular case or diagnosis. The tab below the header allows user to switch between the categories of stats coverage and set a particular month or year for the required data.

 

tubik health care app UX

 

UI design

 

The essential issues to consider about UI design, going deeper into convenient and functional visual presentation of the data in the app, were color palette and typography. As you can see, the designer made his choice in contrast color palette with deep blue general background including the sidebar and header part, that worked well for creating deep contrast with bright orange active icons and basic data in header written in white. Contrarily, the main operative field of the app uses white background which looks natural for the app in health care sphere and serves several important goals:

 

— it supports high level of readability and quick perception of text-based content, which is crucial for healthcare operation with patient’s data, especially in cases of emergency;

 

— it provides the great field of creating prominent contrast for key interaction elements, such as buttons or icons;

 

— it creates the strong association with paper on which the data is fixed and in this way sets the pleasant feel of interaction close to typical operations with physical paper documentation, which can be beneficial for people of older generation, who usually tend to feel better in well-known environment;

 

— it adds the space and air to the screen which is helpful to avoid the feeling of the screen overloaded with information and can hinder quick perception of core data fields.

 

health-care-app-schedule-tubik

 

The screen of the current appointment shows for main areas of data: diagnoses, problems, medications and complex medication plans.

 

health-care-app-calendar-tubik

 

The calendar screen uses light pastel colors for cards which again set the association to the traditional interaction with physical objects when doctors and receptionists use colorful notes to mark the data and organize it on the noticeboard.

 

health-care-app-statistics-tubik

 

Statistics screen shows graphs and charts in minimalistic manner with appliance of contrast colors easily distinguished by human eye. For all the screens, the designer uses simple san serif font, highly legible and readable. Concentration on functionality doesn’t prevent the designer from giving the app simple and elegant appearance with the touch of style and creativity.

 

health care app interactions tubik studio

 

Animated transitions were also added to present some basic interactions with the app: inputting data, operating with pricing and completing the reception.

 

This case has actively opened the direction of design for medical industry and healthcare here in Tubik and proved how many special features and aspects of the job should be taken into account by the designer. The tasks of this kind are definitely challenging, but highly rewarding in both creative and humanity values. No doubt, new day will bring fresh challenges which will result in practical case studies for Tubik Blog readers. Stay tuned and healthy!


Welcome to see the designs by Tubik Studio on Dribbble and Behance

ios development interview

From QA to iOS Development: Life Story of the Career Switch.

Switching the career path and changing long-term ambitions is never an easy choice. Still, in many cases this step is feasible, living up the new hopes and professional growth. In the sphere of web/app design and development this sort of situation is, perhaps, even more common than in the others due to dynamic and rocketing progress of information and communication technology in the world. New professions and positions pop up like mushrooms after the rain, opening totally new perspectives and allowing professionals to set new ambitions.

 

Our today’s story is of this kind: Tubik iOS developer Maxim Pedko will share his experience of the career switch from QA engineering and project management to iOS development. Check out the interview and get inspired!

 

iOS developer tubik studio

 

How did you make the decision on your career choice?

 

Actually, I had quite extensive and various experience: before the first step in development, I worked as a QA engineer and project manager. Still, my big dream getting stronger and stronger was to create real products by myself. One day, working over current tasks, I realized that I have to change my life and try something new that will get me closer to my ambition. I had studied the basics of PHP, web development, CMS and it even let me earn something for a living, but didn’t give me real pleasure from my work. I developed simple plugins for CMS WordPress, but I didn’t feel it like the full-scale development as the plugins were focused mainly on correction of existing design according to client’s requirement, not more. That job wasn’t bad, it was just not the one for me as I didn’t get either aesthetic or professional inspiration.

 

Why did you choose Apple as the field for your career growth?

 

I deeply and sincerely fell for iPhones and other products by Apple after their first presentation. That distant day when Steve Jobs presented a new revolutionary buttonless mobile phone with beautiful photorealistic interface, called iPhone, they won me over with their design and usability. Since then, I have been a keen fan of Apple, although unfortunately I didn’t have a chance to get their devices for myself. Certainly, a lot of things have changed since the presentations of the first iPhone, iOS, iPad, yet I am still the supporter of this company products and philosophy.

 

Swift vs Objective-C. Why did you choose Swift?

 

Before I started programming for iOS devices, I had analyzed the well-known and established Objective-C and newer Swift. For me, the issues to consider were the following:

  • Swift is easier readable than Objective-C
  • Swift is easier maintained and supported
  • Swift requires less amount of code
  • Interactive coding is available at Swift Sandbox
  • Swift is the platform for the future, as Apple have outlined their intent of the full switch to this programming language.

 

ios development interview

 

Where does the way of iOS developer start?

 

To start developing iOS applications, first of all you need high motivation and wish to grow professionally. Without the great desire to self-develop and study the field in detail, it’s better not to start, moving yourself to the further search of the domain you are interested in. Starting the career in iOS development, you should be ready to some aspects that won’t let you do it from the very first day. For instance, you won’t be able to code iOS apps without a computer from Apple! You will need Xcode which works only on MacOS.

 

I have tried the software that is argued to enable developers to code for iOS on other operational systems: it took me ages to install it via virtual machines and tune the soft into more or less working condition, still it didn’t work efficiently and heavily overloaded the computer. There were even the moments when I got so frustrated that wanted to throw away my computer through the window and forget it as a nightmare. So, I had to accept the rules of the game that there’s no other way than coding for iOS on MacOS.

 

Another essential thing to mention is that to develop iOS apps you really need only Apple computer still it’s not required to buy all the existing devices like iPhones, iPads, Apple Watches etc. Xcode has simulators of all the devices with which the application will be potentially used so having developed the application for one of them, you can instantly test it on the simulator of the device.

 

ios development glossary

 

Anyway, if you have bought an Apple computer, set up Xcode and are ready to code iOS apps, you will need the reliable source of information, knowledge and practice in studying Swift. There are numerous materials on this topic shared via YouTube, such as video lessons and vlogs; also you will definitely find the text-based sources like blogs and forums for developers, but the most reliable, actual and truthful source of data for you is the official website for Apple developers.  Another useful resource is Swift website  presenting lots of tutorials and practice for studying Swift coding and I would also recommend the interactive course Developing iOS 9 Apps with Swift. No doubt, to keep up-to-date, iOS developer should never miss conferences and presentations  from Apple.

 

What are the other domains of knowledge needed in this sphere?

 

I have to admit that basic knowledge plays the vital role for professional growth in this field. Before you start to learn programming not being a native English speaker, you have to understand that without knowing English solidly you’ll get the experience when the best and the most reliable sources on not only iOS, but also programming in general are shut for you. That’s the reason to constantly improve and practice the language even if you think you know it well.

 

If you don’t own Apple computer working on MacOs, it’s not the reason to get in despair. You have to plan your steps and study everything that you will potentially need in the future. Before starting iOS development, I had studied operations in client-server applications, REST API, basics of OOP, databases, base operators, types of data, — everything that can be studied before starting real practice in coding on Swift.

 

Could you share your real experience that allows considering the possible risks?

 

As I’ve mentioned, to get real experience you will obviously need an Apple computer. If you don’t have it, try asking your friends or finding hubs where you’ll be able to try actual programming on Mac. It’s vital to understand if you really want to continue your professional way in the sphere as, you see, the start needs some basic capital, at least in the form of quite expensive hardware.

 

When you start getting real experience in development, don’t be afraid to start coding for real simple projects and get precious practice of both development and communication with customers. That’s important to make your name in this highly competitive sphere and open new perspectives for complex and interesting projects in the future.

 

If by any reason you are afraid of freelance platforms or frightened to be cheated, working over your own projects you should carefully plan the tasks and set the deadlines. There are many good sources where you can buy lessons or get them free, and there you are provided with the practical tasks which you are obliged to complete. You have to be persistent, try and study, be always open to new knowledge in development, — this is the only productive way to the day when you start creating efficiently working code.

 

As for me, to get the knowledge and practice of iOS development without having my own Apple computer, I did my best to get enrolled to Tubik Studio as an intern. To get more practice and have more hours of effective studying, I took the risky step having left my previous workplace and devoting the maximum of time to progress in what I saw my future. After two month the risk paid off: I got an offer of the full-time developer’s position in iOS department. Moreover, I’ve got the precious experience of working in team of professionals that opens the door to more complex, sophisticated and significant projects, shut for freelancers working solo.

 

tubik studio developers testing

 

And my message to those who start this way is the following: it’s not enough to buy the original computer, it’s not enough to narrowly focus on one aspect of the job without studying the others. It’s vital to realize that whatever is the sphere of development you see yourself in, you should get filled with new knowledge on a daily basis, and only persistence, hard work and self-education will bring you to being a productive and highly-skilled developer.


Welcome to read more articles on iOS and web development

web design tubik studio

Tips on Applying Copy Content in User Interfaces

Words are a powerful weapon. They can bring both success and failure depending on how you put them together. They can motivate or confuse, strengthen or weaken, call or push away. That’s why designing a digital product, it’s vital to remember that high-quality copy is as essential as the details of visual performance.

 

In one of our previous articles, we’ve already considered the big role of textual content in UI design, covering the definition of copy and its functions in graphic user interfaces. The important point to remember from it here is the words cannot be fully replaced with the graphics whatever amazing, high-quality and professional they are going to be. Efficient and engaging copy content in user interfaces is defined by two equally significant basic criteria: the quality of writing and the appropriate look. Words and visual elements should mutually support each other, exist in harmony and provide organic consistency. So, every single piece of copy should be thoughtfully analyzed and created in a way corresponding to the general design concept and enhancing positive user experience via successful interaction. 

 

Could you imagine an interface containing badly-written copy with the same type sizes, fonts, and colors? The chances are big that it would cost users great effort to solve their problems or get needed information with the product, so they would simply choose other product that is more user-friendly and less time-consuming. Let’s check what types of copy content designers and copywriters deal with creating websites or mobile applications, and think over the points needing special attention.

 

copywriting tips

 

Visual hierarchy

 

To organize content in interfaces clearly for users, designers apply a well-known technique called visual hierarchy. It is initially based on Gestalt psychological theory and its main goal is to present the content on the carrier, be it a book page or poster, web page or mobile screen, in such a way that users can understand the level of importance for each element. It activates the ability of the brain to distinguish objects on the basis of their physical differences, such as size, color, contrast, alignment etc. In the aspect of creating copy content for web pages and mobile app screens, there are two aspects important to consider: page scanning patterns and typographic hierarchy. 

 

Understanding the importance of visual performance and readability of copy in digital products and its impact on user experience, numerous usability experts explore this issue comprehensively and collect statistics providing valuable data for designers. Lots of studies have shown that before reading a web page people scan it to get a sense of whether they are interested. According to different studies, including the publications by Nielsen Norman Group as one of the pioneers of this field, UXPin team and others, there are several popular scanning patterns for web pages, among which “F” and “Z” patterns.

 

F-pattern is referred to as the most common eye-scanning pattern, especially for web pages with big amount of content. A user first scans a horizontal line on the top of the screen, then moves down the page a bit and reads across the horizontal line which usually covers a shorter area. And the last one is a vertical line down on the left side of the copy where they look for keywords in the paragraphs’ initial sentences. It usually occurs on text-heavy pages like blogs, news platforms, thematic editorials etc. How could designers employ this knowledge? First of all, placing the information of key importance or core interest on the most scanned spots and trying to use short catching headlines and bold headers to draw users’ attention.

 

Z-pattern is applied to pages which are not so heavily concentrated on copy. A user first scans across the top of the page starting from the top left corner, looking for important information, and then goes down to the opposite corner at a diagonal, finishing with the horizontal line at the bottom of the page, again from left to right. This is a typical model of scanning for landing pages or websites not loaded with copy and not requiring scrolling down the page, which means that all the core data is visible in the pre-scroll area. In this case, designers place core information in the spots of highest attention, such as top corners, and put the other points requiring attention along the top and bottom lines.

 

website design tubik studio

The Big Landscape

 

Here we can see the design concept for a website which presents the online magazine «The Big Landscape». The interface is minimalist following the principles of clear visual hierarchy, good readability, intuitive navigation and aesthetic pleasure from visual perception. The designer followed Z-scanning-pattern placing vital elements such as the logo and CTA button in the corners of the top line while the bottom line informs users about the website creators and provides the ability to contact via social networks instantly. 

 

Typographic hierarchy

 

Typographic hierarchy is a system that organizes copy content in the best way for users’ perception first of all via modifications and the combination of types and fonts. It is aimed at creating the contrast between the most meaningful and prominent copy elements which should be noticed first and ordinary text information. The contrast is created by regulating type fonts, sizes, and colors as well as their placement and alignment. Typographic hierarchy is presented with common types of copy content used in UI design.

 

Headlines

 

A headline is the first thing that users should see in any interface. It is a large, bold word or phrase which transfers and emphasizes the core informative message on the page. It’s essential for headlines to be catchy and short so that they could draw users’ attention, and meaningful in order to inform users about the theme and benefits of the content of the page or screen. According to the research published by one of the popular social media sharing platforms Buffer, the ideal length of the headline is 6 words; Jacob Nielsen provides the study at which shows that headlines of 5-6 work effectively, not less than extensive headlines presenting a full sentence. 

 

Another point to remember: it’s good when headline is visually supported by other elements on the page or screen, still it also should be understandable and meaningful without such context.

 

website design for photographers

Photography Workshops 

 

Here is the landing page for a company organizing photo tours and workshops for photographers. Functional and stylish minimalism is the basic approach behind the web interface. The bold headline is placed on the left which makes it noticeable but the major accent still remains on the head picture.

 

landing page UI design tubik studio

Website on cooking seafood

 

tubik_studio_website_ui_bakery

Vinny’s Bakery

 

These are two examples of the websites concentrated on providing content around the same theme — food. They both have minimalist design with centrally located headlines. However, the headlines differ with the message they send to the users as well as nature of the websites differs in its core: one of them stimulates uniting users around the action (cooking seafood) while the other is focused in presenting the goods (bread and bakery). The first example presents a website collecting recipes of meals with seafood from all over the world, so its headline contains a CTA with a key element — action verb in imperative form “Let’s cook!”, which dynamically tunes users into the activity. On the other hand, we can see another concept — a website for a small bakery selling homemade bread. The lyrical headline makes users feel warm, sets strong positive emotional connection and lets them instantly imagine the smell of bakery products which are sold via the website.

 

Subheaders

 

It’s impossible to put all the significant information in a headline, that’s why you need subheaders. These are brief, concise and catchy phrases that are similar to headlines, although they typically mark out the key points in separate sections while headlines summarize the theme or message of the whole page. Following the principles of visual hierarchy, fonts chosen for subheaders are usually smaller than for headlines but bigger than the rest of the copy. Traditionally, they are also bold and short. 

 

Landing Page Animation Tubik Studio

Organic — landing page

 

tubikstudio travel gear landing

Travel Gear Landing Page

 

Subheaders play a big role in landing page design. These two concepts for landing pages above are good examples of how subheaders inform users about the data provided in different sections. Bold subheaders point out the main idea of body copy helping users find the information they need easily and quickly.

 

Body copy

 

Body copy is usually a part of text presenting the description or some essential information placed in a compact block, usually under a subheader or a headline. Fonts are thinner and smaller than in headlines and subheaders, sometimes they are presented in italic for even more prominent visual contrast.

 

There is no unified opinion about the best length of body copy. Some content creators support the approach that long copy is more informative and serious-looking, while the others claim that only short copy is effective because Internet users never want to read too much. Here in Tubik we support the approach that the length of the effective and user-friendly copy depends directly on target audience: users, as well as products, are incredibly different, they have diverse preferences, goals and wishes when search for web resources or mobile apps. Both long and short copy have their own pros and cons, and each of them can be appropriate than depending on target audience of the product and its conversion goals.

 

Short copy is often effective for mobile interfaces and landing pages: their users are usually keen to see concise and highly informative copy content. Moreover, mobile interfaces have limited amount of space, so too much copy won’t look nice and will demand additional effort for reading, which can be the reason for poor user experience. Long copy is good for web resources that provide users with complex information on specific topics as well as presentation of the products which aren’t well-known for users and need additional informative support.

 

website design UI

Architecture Firm

 

Here is the example of a web page where long copy is useful. It’s a design concept featuring a website for architectural bureau following minimalistic and functional approach in creative practice and demonstrating it via website visual performance. The aim of such websites is to tell the company’s story, present professional level and achievements, so detailed copy works efficiently in this case.

 

tubik studio web ui design

Birds of Paradise Encyclopedia

 

This design concept also presents a website deeply based on the copy: it’s an educational project setting the online encyclopedia about the specific family of birds. Although it contains a great amount of information presented in text, this type of content is logically divided into many brief and concentrated copy blocks supported with prominent headlines as well as bright and catchy illustrations. This approach makes interaction with the website more dynamic which is especially effective for a teenage part of target readers that presumably often perceive encyclopedias as boring stuff.

 

tubik toonie help screens interaction

Toonie Alarm tutorial

 

As we mentioned above, short copy is useful for mobile interfaces since they are limited in space. The interface of brief tutorial for Toonie Alarm app demonstrates how copy is divided into short blocks in order to leave enough «air» on the screen and make copy readable.

 

Call-to-action elements with copy

 

The core elements that make UI interactive are those which contain a call-to-action (CTA). Some call-to-action elements may be represented with icons that don’t require copy using widely and instantly recognized icons such as a telephone receiver for a phone call or the envelope for mail. However, in cases when the image of an icon is not so obvious or can be misleading, it is more effective to use double scheme, when the icon, button, or link is supported with the copy.

 

The copy for call-to-action elements consists of one or two words or a linked phrase in a body copy. Verbs in the imperative form are one of the frequently applied mechanisms of engaging users.  Designers are recommended to use various techniques of creating contrast, first of all via color, in CTA elements, so that they could stand out in the layout and draw user’s attention quickly.

 

tubikstudio swiftybeaver landing

Landing page for SwiftyBeaver

 

travel agency website UI

Travel Agency Website

 

The CTA buttons on these two landing pages are both centrally located, although they employ different types of copy. The first one consists of the four-word-phrase, while the other applies only one word. However, both look good and work effectively since they both contain the verb in the imperative form and inform target audience about appropriate action solving their potential task on this website.

 

good_sign_app_tubikstudio

Good Sign App Concept 

 

This is a concept for an unusual Good Sign app that gives you a new sign to look for, and you make your wish every time you see it in real life. Such an extraordinary app has also unusual CTA buttons like “Make a wish”.

 

book swap app tubik studio

Book Swap App

 

There’s no need to create CTA buttons exceptionally in bright colors — their main task is to be easily noticeable in the general layout. If the interface is bright and colorful, why don’t you make the contrast with light background which will make bright copy even more prominent, like in a concept for the Book Swap app above?

 

Captions

 

Caption is the short text under a picture describing its content. In web interfaces fonts are usually small and often italic, and in mobile interfaces, the sizes of fonts depend on a size of a picture.

 

gym landing page fragment

Gym Landing Page

 

Here is a concept for the landing page of a gym. The captions here have bold fonts that make them easy to read. They are shown only when the picture is hovered which makes interaction more engaging for the users.

 

Points to consider

 

All in all, creating a quality copy content isn’t that hard if you keep in mind the typographic hierarchy principles. And here are some basic tips on presenting the copy:

 

  • Create catchy headlines. They draw users’ attention and often become the point of decision whether user continues interaction with the page or bounces it.
  • Make headlines short, but keep them highly informative. 
  • Subheaders relate to separate section, so they guide users through the content in the interface.
  • Use brief concise copy for mobile interfaces and landing pages.
  • Consider using long copy for web resources aimed at providing informative content.
  • Use verbs in the imperative form to encourage people to actions.
  • Use contrast colors for call-to-action elements, so that they could draw user’s attention more effectively. However, don’t forget to test readability of the text on the CTA elements: it has a crucial impact on usability and conversion rates.
  • A caption should preferably describe or add the data that isn’t obvious from the image.
  • Give strong preference to present tenses in captions.
  • Always ground your solutions on preliminary user research and don’t neglect testing different options.

 

Recommended reading

 

Here is the collection of recommended articles for further reading in case you would like to read more on the theme.

 

The 5 pillars of visual hierarchy in Web design

6 principles of visual hierarchy for designers

On Visual Hierarchy

F-Shaped Pattern For Reading Web Content

3 Design Layouts: Gutenberg Diagram, Z-Pattern, And F-Pattern

Effective Writing For Your UI: Things to Avoid

The Ideal Length of Everything Online, Backed by Research

Copywriting in UI. Words that Make Design Go Round.

 

Our next publication will continue the comprehensive theme of visual hierarchy and its effective practices in web and mobile interfaces. Don’t miss!


 

Welcome to see the designs by Tubik Studio on Dribbble and Behance

year in review tubik studio design

Tubik Studio 2016. Year in Review.

Bright, fast and furious, the year 2016 is over. For Tubik Studio it was dynamic, bright, rich in meetings, shots, interesting projects and non-stop professional growth. The company got bigger, more experienced and diverse. Traditionally, we start every new stage of our workflow remembering the most significant points of what has already been done, and today won’t be an exception. Let’s take a moment to turn back for a while and remember some outstanding things that marked 2016 for our team.

 

Being active on Dribbble, we published over 170 shots. Welcome to look through the set of top positions in the categories of UI/UX design, animation, branding and illustration. Following the links, you will be able to see all their detailed descriptions and full-size attachments.

 

Top Twenty UI/UX shots

 

tubik studio web design

Page 404

 

tubikstudio travel gear landing

Travel Gear Landing Page

 

tubikstudio library widget

Library Widget

 

tubikstudio ui webdesign

Comics Shop Home Page

 

graphic design tutorial tubik studio

Singify App Tutorial

 

Christmas graphic design tubik studio

Magic Christmas App

 

tubikstudio homepage design

Event Agency Webpage

web design UI concept tubik studio

The Big Landscape

 

tubik_studio_website_ui_bakery

Vinny’s Bakery

 

health care app UI design

Health Care App

 

website design tubik studio

Adventure Agency Website

 

landing page UI design tubik studio

Website on cooking seafood

 

tubikstudio graphic design illustration

Ryiadh Tour Guide

 

tubik studio design

Weather App Concept

 

mobile app design tubik studio

Moneywise App

 

travel app tutorial tubik studio

Travel App Tutorial

 

snake battle app UI design

Snake Battle

 

toonie alarm UI design

Toonie Alarm

 

online magazine design tubik studio

Daily Bugle Online Magazine

 

book swap app tubik studio

Book Swap App

 

Top Twenty Animated shots

 

tubik studio web ui design

Birds of Paradise Encyclopedia

 

landing page animation Tubik studio

Magic.co landing page animation

 

 

tubik_studio_book_swap

Book Swap App

 

Landing Page Animation Tubik Studio

Organic — landing page animation

 

tubik studio healthy food animation

Healthy Food App 

 

tubik studio application recipes and cooking

Recipes App

 

tubikstudio ui design

BuonApp

 

website design UI

Architecture Firm

 

Tubik studio UI animation

Museu

tubik studio ice ui website

Ice Website

 

tubikstudio ui animation website design

Bjorn Website

 

ui animation cafe app tubikstudio

Cafe Coupon App

 

apple even animation tubik studio

Apple Event Animated Graphics

 

gym landing page concept by Tubik

Gym Landing Page

 

tubik studio animated illustration

Lowrider

 

tubik_toonie_help_screens_interaction

Toonie Alarm tutorial

 

animation design

Night Run Animation

 

Contact List Concept Scrolls Tubik

Contact List Concept

 

animated tutorial

Social Network Tutorial

 

motion design tubik studio

Rocket Animation

 

Top Ten Branding shots

 

business cards design

Deetu Business Cards

 

logo design music app tubik studio

Switch-up logo

 

logo design tubik studio

fOxygenic logo

 

andre logo design tubik studio

Andre logo 

 

logo design branding tubik

Pickitout logo

 

lion browser logo tubik studio

Lion browser logo icon

 

snake battle logo for game app

Snake Battle Logo

horsy logo design branding

Horsy Logo

 

logo design by Tubik studio

Elephun logo

 

logo animation tubik studio

Realli logo

 

Top Ten Illustration shots

 

Rio 2016 Illustration tubik studio

Rio 2016

 

graphic design illustration tubik studio

Californication Bus

 

tubikstudio space wallpapers

Free Space Wallpapers

 

character illustration tubik studio

Indian Dreamcatcher

 

Christmas graphic design tubik studio

Christmas Spirit Illustration

 

game character design tubik studio

Ulf the Viking

 

tubik illustration jazz tales book

Tales of the Jazz Age Book Cover

 

tubik studio illustration graphic design

Muscles Magazine

 

star-wars-rogue-one_tubik_studio_illustration

Star Wars Rogue One Illustration

 

badges illustration tubik studio

PukaPal Badges

 

Top Ten Articles in Tubik Blog

 

2016 brought a great deal of new posts in Tubik Blog to share our ideas, case studies and experience. Here is the list of some articles which got shared and read by big number of readers.

 

tubik blog article

Visual Perception: Icons vs Copy in UI

 

Tubik Studio Interface Animation

UI Animation: Microinteraction for Macroresult

 

toonie alarm time picker

The Ultimate Guide to Creating a Mobile Application

 

book swap app design

UI Animation: Eye-Pleasing, Problem-Solving.

 

lion browser logo tubik studio

Logo Design: Creative Stages.

 

tubikstudio ui ux design

UI/UX Glossary: Steps to Usability.

 

web design tubik studio

Home Sweet Home. Strategies of Home Page Design.

 

tubik studio ui design dark

Dark Side of UI: Benefits of Dark Background.

 

ios-developers-tubik-studio

Review of Popular Trends and Tools for Developers in 2016

 

UI design trends

Review of Popular Design Trends for Interfaces in 2016

 

Top Five Tubik News

 

Growing diversity of services

In 2016 we formed the full team of specialists able to create and maintain a digital product from scratch to release: today we are a comprehensive full-cycle digital agency, with experienced specialists in the domains of branding, UI/UX design for websites and applications, graphic design of any complexity, motion design, iOS and web-development, QA testing.

 

collaboration-process-app-design

 

Variety of outsource projects

2016 brought us the great bunch of outsource design and development projects for diversity of businesses and organizations. They established broad experience of collaboration with different customers, including big and well-known clients. One of the latest projects of 2016 was a «year-in-review» video for Opera.

 

 

In-house iOS application: Toonie Alarm

In 2016, to get closer to our outsource clients, we have set the purpose to create in-house studio products helpful for their target audience and adding some social value as well as giving us comprehensive experience of full path for creating and promoting digital products. In the domain of iOS app design, the product created and released by Tubik in 2016 is Toonie Alarm, entertaining and funny free alarm app for iPhones rewarding users for waking up with cute stickers. 

 


 

In-house content project: Design4Users

Design4Users is a blog devoted to diverse design issues solving users’ problems. It is organized via the basic categories such as «Branding» «Product» «Print» and «UI/UX» and plenty of more detailed tags in the mentioned domains. This resource was started with the aim to provide designers, customers and all those who are interested in this sphere of human activity with a wide variety of useful and interesting content supported with attractive and functional design. The blog is designed, developed and curated fully by Tubik studio team.

 

design4users blog

 

Free e-books by Tubik team

Additional big news was the start of Tubik Magazine, the set of free e-books from us about different aspects, approaches and tips on design and development. The first issue called Design for Business presented a variety of business points and terms important to consider for designers working over goal-centered design for companies and brands. The second ebook called Logo design was devoted to creative stages and strategies of efficient logo design. Both books are supported with practical cases. Welcome to read them or download totally for free.

 

tubik studio free ebook design for business

 

Bright moments of work, rest and creative search were traditionally shared with our followers on studio Instagram page. No doubt, we also didn’t miss the chance to share our ideas, news, tips and experience via Medium and Quora as well as kept everyone updated with studio news via Twitter, FacebookTumblr and Flipboard.

 

new-year-photo

 

Even this quite brief review makes obvious that 2016 was full of everything for our team. And we are ready for new challenges, perspectives and projects in 2017 which will definitely open many new unforgettable creative pages. 

 

 

Warm greetings for everyone from Tubik Studio, we wish you amazing and successful year 2017!