Tag Archives: project management

web development job insights

Close Insight into Web Developer’s Craft

Being a web developer is not just writing code. It is literally breathing life into a website. It is making help, beauty, information and communication available for thousands and millions of people around the world. It is allowing stunning, stylish and user-friendly designs get live and do their best job. It is spending hours in the complicated and mysterious word of characters and signs enriching personal and professional progress. That is making wonders right from your desk and your computer.

 

Who are web developers and what do they do? One of our previous articles here in Tubik Blog has already unveiled a bit of basics on their job, let’s go further today. A lot of people conceivably count that web developers just provide technical side of building websites, but the job goes far beyond this simple definition. Professionals of this sphere are also required to analyze user’s needs to ensure that proper content, graphics and underlying structure are created and maintained to meet the goals of both users and website owners.

 

web developer tubik studio

 

What are web developer’s responsibilities?

 

Generally, all web developers can be divided into three groups. The first group focuses solely on the underlying software and databases (back-end development), while the second one works on the interface and visual design (front-end development). There’s also the third group whose representatives combine both directions (full-stack development).

 

Daily responsibilities include:

 

  • coding in one or more programming or scripting languages, such as PHP, Java, Ruby or JavaScript;
  • debugging, refactoring and optimizing existing code;
  • fixing bugs in existing projects;
  • testing new features thoroughly to ensure they perform the correct task in all cases;
  • testing performance of created web application or website;
  • building and testing Application Program Interfaces (APIs) for applications to exchange data;
  • converting written, graphic, audio and video components to compatible web formats;
  • participation in creating UX (logic and transitions) and UI (visual design performance) design in tight collaboration with designers at pre-development stages;
  • building and maintaining databases;
  • deciding on the best tools, technologies, languages and frameworks for the project;
  • planning and prototyping new applications or websites;
  • staying up to date with new trends and advancements in web development;
  • informing designers, developers and project staff for progress updates;
  • gathering requirements and wishes from clients and users.

 

The list can be continued longer and longer and amaze users and customers by its diversity.

 

programming languages fron-end

 

What should a web developer know?

 

A web developer (particularly, front-end developer) should know how to activate web content via code in a user-friendly way. This task provides a challenging aspect to website development and maintenance. The website should not be too simple for advanced users, nor should it be so intricate that the beginner is easily lost in the surfing process. This is the point on which UX/UI designers and developers are advised to support each other uniting their effort and professional knowledge and skills. Effective collaboration of these sides usually results in user-friendly efficient web product in which design finds sophisticated ways to support usability and harmony of logical and visual presentation while development sets the elegant methods to activate and maintain those solutions in live websites.

 

Hyper-Text Markup Language (HTML), JavaScript (JS) and Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) are the foundation of front-end development. HTML is the main language used to build and display a website or web application. JS provides user interfaces and enhances interactivity of a website. CSS is used for the look and design of the website in spreadsheets written in HTML. These languages are essential of building website front-end.

 

Here are some examples of client-side programming languages:

 

-HTML
-XHTML
-CSS
-JavaScript
-Flash
-Microsoft Silverlight

 

A back-end developer builds and maintains the technology that connects user-facing side of the website to its server side. The back end of a website consists of a server, an application, and a database. In an effort to make the server, application, and database communicate with each other, back-end developers use server-side languages like PHP, Java, Ruby, .NET and others to build an application, and tools like MySQL, Oracle, and SQL Server to find, save, remove or change data and send it back to the user in client-side code.

 

Back-end developers use these languages and tools to create or contribute to web applications with clean, portable, readable code. However, before writing the code, they need to collaborate with clients to understand their particular needs and wishes, then translate those into technical requirements and come up with the most efficient solution for architecting the technology.

 

Here are some examples of server-side programming languages:

-PHP
-C++
-C
-C#
-Java
-Python
-Ruby
-Erlang

 

And these are some examples of widely used tools:

-MySQL
-PostgreSQL
-MongoDB
-Microsoft SQL Server
-Oracle
-Sybase
-SAP HANA
-IBM DB2

 

web development

 

What skills are advantageous for web developers?

 

On the basis of everyday routine here in Tubik Studio, it’s easy to state that web developers have to display comprehensive diversity of technical knowledge in the spheres such as client-side languages and development, server-side languages and development, web application frameworks and relational database management systems (RDBMS), as well as experience of dealing with version control systems and understanding of the architecture of web applications, web security and encryption.

 

Let’s look closer at skills and qualities that could be beneficial for people choosing web development as their professional sphere.

 

Good communication skills

Developers should be ready to various types of communication, depending on every particular case and deciding on the most effective one:

  • Face-to-face;
  • Phone;
  • Email;
  • Online chat;
  • Social networks;
  • A variety of instant messaging apps.

 

As a web developer, even one who works remotely, they need to be able to communicate confidently and effectively with clients, users, superiors, colleagues and perhaps other developers from outsource companies.

 

Flexibility and Adaptability

Websites and back-end requirements may change over time. Clients can be inconsistent by various reasons, alter considerations or critical details, perhaps as their businesses change. It is important to be flexible and adaptable, while also setting boundaries so that the scope on the project doesn’t creep too far. It means:

 

— Having to learn new languages, frameworks, skills, etc.

— Being ready to take on extra responsibilities

— Dealing with the situations when a project you are working on is cancelled

— Adapting to the changes in your working hours

— Ability to work independently and in mixed teams

— Staying up-to-date with new tools, methods of coding, etc.

 

Priorities setting

It is an important part of any web developer’s job. Developers may not be responsible for the overall web project, but will still find themselves having to prioritize tasks and deal with other participants of the process who also have their own deadlines and parameters to keep.

 

Logical approach to problem solving

One of the hardest parts about being a web developer is addressing challenges. Before making decisions, research and thorough analysis are needed for finding out what is the problem and its roots.

 

Attention to detail

It will become a key to the kingdom for those who want to program because in huge number of cases code is long and complicated. Lack of attention and healthy pedantry has direct influence on the level of productivity as well as speed and quality of web product performance.

 

front end develoment tubik studio

 

What is a career perspective?

 

Web developers in companies or tech organizations usually start their careers as junior or entry-level developers before becoming senior or mid-level developers after around couple years or even faster, depending on abilities to learn and speed of skills practicing. Comparing to freelance projects, job in organizations often means getting involved into creating complex and serious digital products, meeting more clients, leading client meetings and working on large and longer-term projects. Senior developers might also manage junior developers.

 

After reaching advanced professional level, the next position is lead developer, technical lead or head of development. Generally, these promotions involve managing a team of web developers and contributing to the organization’s technical strategy and goals. It also means the amount of actual coding work will decrease. The next step can be a senior or even board-level position, for example Chief Technical Officer (CTO) or Technology Vice President.

 

The Bottom Line

 

When you open a web-browser, chose website and load it, the site, designed and developed properly and thoughtfully, will load instantly opening the variety of operations to your disposal. It sometimes knocks you down with its awesome layout, well-constructed pages, useful information and impressive visuals. Who is responsible for this positive experience? Sure, it is the team of designers, creating idea, logic and visual performance, content creators, planning and writing appropriate filling for the webpages, and web developers who seem to be a sort of magicians able to enliven all the stuff and bring it to the user quickly and efficiently. Web development has many ways for professional growth and self-fulfillment, and all of these directions are complicated but professionally rewarding.


Welcome to read the article about basic terms of web development and issues of front-end development

Welcome to see the designs by Tubik Studio on Dribbble and Behance

Design is a job quotes

Design Is a Job. 30 Honest Quotes by Mike Monteiro

For plenty of people design is a synonym of art. And for some creative guys who do not make their living or their business that way, it perhaps is. However, for those who decide on making design their job solving problems and pains, it obtains other perspective and requires different approach. Sometimes it becomes a great discovery what a goal-centered activity design is and how many problems can be solved with it, far more than just aesthetic satisfaction.  It is vitally important to understand that from the first steps on the path to avoid disappointment and achieve access.

 

In one of earlier articles with tips to beginners in app and web design our first advice based on practical experience was rather simple. The first and really crucial thing may sound quite primitive: you should make sure that you really want to make it your job. There are lots of people who, being great artists, deeply creative and inspired, get broken by the necessity to work systematically with strict deadlines and loads of requirements and wishes (sometimes illogical or not-too-professional) from the customers. Clear up the nature of your job: designer is not a pure artist free of obligations and fully devoted to creativity. Nope. In different stages of your project, you’re also going to be a researcher, an analyst, a time-manager and so on and so forth. Bear in mind all those things from the very start of the way.

 

For those who have made this vital decision, today we would like to recommend a useful and helpful book «Design Is a Job» by witty expert Mike Monteiro, the co-founder of Mule Design. The book reveals all the stages of design job, including communication with clients, organization of the process, drawing contracts, working in teams of colleagues and so on and so forth. The author doesn’t try to make the profession look like magic: he is deeply and sometimes sharply honest about not only the benefits but also pitfalls. In the foreword to the book, Erik Spiekermann says: «Contrary to popular belief, designers are not artists. We employ artistic methods to visualize thinking and process, but, unlike artists, we work to solve a client’s problem, not present our own view of the world.» The ideas shared by Mike Monteiro are highly practical in supporting this thesis. It is not about design process inside only, it is more about the outer part of the design world, full of clients, requirements, goals, metrics, iterations, presentations and discussions.

 

Here we would like to share a new set of design quotes which we grabbed from this book for Tubik Studio Quotes Collection. This time it will be fully loaded with honest and informative thoughts by Mike Monteiro. Join in!

 

Design is a job quotes

 

A designer requires honest feedback and real criticism, and that’s not going to happen in a realm where colleagues or clients are worried about crushing the spirit of a magical being. The sparkly fog of affirmation gets in the way.

 

Clients will always ask you to make their logo bigger, prescribe solutions, and ask you to do things that will make you smack your forehead. You can roll your eyes at how much they don’t understand about design or you can roll up your sleeves and begin practicing your craft by helping them clarify what they need.

 

If you can stand in front of a client completely confident and explain why you are worth the amount you quoted, you should charge it.

 

The general rule is to involve as many people as possible in early discussions, and make that number as small as possible once you go into review cycles.

 

Anyone who hires you because they thought you could do the job and then doesn’t let you do it has lost respect for either you or the design process.

 

Whether you are helping to launch a new business from scratch, or making incremental changes to an existing product, or something in between, any design task you undertake must serve a goal. It’s your job to find out what those goals are.

 

quotes collection design tubik studio

 

Successful design balances convention—familiar forms, terms, and interactions—and novelty—new forms to engage and delight the users, in the hope they will stick around a bit longer and maybe buy their pants here instead of somewhere else. As long as you remember that those new forms must serve the goals of the business. Otherwise, they’re just novelty.

 

A good client will trust your process as long as they have transparency into it, can see results, and you’re willing to bend a little here and there. Without breaking.

 

A designer who does not present his or her own work is not a designer. Presenting the work, explaining the rationale, answering questions, and eliciting feedback are part of the design toolkit. If you sit at your desk while someone else presents work to the client, you don’t get to complain about the feedback. The failure was yours.

 

Clients are the lifeblood of a healthy business. They are the oxygen in your bloodstream that keeps everything going. No matter how good you are at what you do, without someone willing to pay you for that service you will have to close your doors.

 

tubikstudio design quotes

 

If you’re trying to decide between two design firms that seem equally talented, the one that came with a referral has a solid advantage. And that vetting goes both ways—a client who is well-socialized and has a good reputation in a large network is more likely to be a great client. In most cases, you’re going to be as skeptical of a client who hires a designer from an ad as they are of the designer who answered that ad.

 

…you should aim to be pleasant to work with, as everyone would rather work with someone pleasant than with an asshole. But no one wants to work with someone who’s faking it. Doing good work often requires a few hard conversations.

 

The biggest myth ever perpetuated in the design field is that good design sells itself. (The second is that Copperplate is a legitimate typeface.) Design can’t speak for itself any more than a tamale can take off its own husk. You’re presenting a solution to a business problem, and you’re presenting it as an advocate for the end users. The client needs to know that you’ve studied the problem, understood its complexities, and that you’re working from that understanding.

 

Ultimately, your job is to make the client feel confident in the design. Confidence is as much of a deliverable as anything you’re handing over in the project.

 

There’s a difference between being enjoyable to work with and being “nice.” Being nice means worrying about keeping up the appearance of harmony at the expense of being straightforward and fully engaged. Sometimes you need to tell a client they’re making the wrong call.

 

design quotes tubik studio

 

Of course, being the most pleasant person in the world won’t help your cause if the work isn’t good. But don’t make the mistake of thinking the quality of your work by itself will be a shining beacon that pulls clients near.

 

You can do a lot to show a client how valuable time is in how you comport yourself throughout the project. Run your meetings and work sessions efficiently. Come in prepared. Don’t run over. Don’t hang out. Don’t train clients to think you’ve got extra time on your hands.

 

At the risk of sounding like a broken record, stay in good communication with your clients at all times. They will accept your process as long as you are showing them results. Make sure to set their expectations correctly as to what is happening when.

 

Over the years the one constant that we’ve been able to rely on is that how a potential client behaves in the business development process is exactly how they will behave during the project. Trust your gut.

 

design quote tubik studio

 

Never work for free. Any work you take on for free will get pushed aside for paying work. That does neither you nor the client any favors. Neither of you will respect each other’s time. If the situation merits it, work at a discounted rate. But submit a budget showing the actual rate, with the discount applied. Let the client know the value of what they’re getting.

 

Not knowing the design language doesn’t make someone a bad client.

 

Only you know the value of your time. (Hint: it is greater than $0.) But the value of your work to a particular client depends on what the client has to gain from that work. And the client is not buying time from you. They are buying work. The value of that work is what you need to charge them for.

 

As we tell potential clients when they ask us what their site will look like: “Oh, we have no damn idea. But we know what the process is for finding out.”

 

But much like the best umbrella is the umbrella you have on you, the best process is always the one you’re having success with. Don’t fall for trendy processes. If the one you’re using works for you, go with it.

 

tubik studio design quotes

 

You’re not going to ask for permission to do things your way. You’re going to convince clients that your way works by showing them how you will use your process to meet their goals. And you’ll back this up by showing them how many times it’s worked in the past.

 

Throughout a project you may have to remind a client multiple times that they agreed to follow your process. And throughout a project you will have to convince a client that your process is actually on target to get them the results they need. There will be hand-holding. There will be tough love. But above all, you will have to stand your ground and stick to what you know works.

 

…just make it a habit never to speak ill of your clients. They’re paying your bills. And putting their livelihood in your hands. They’re good people.

 

Working with other (talented) designers makes you a better designer, and is essential to your professional development, especially early in your career. There’s simply no better way to learn your craft than to watch someone else practice it.

 

Not only can a designer change the world, a designer should. This is the best job in the world! Let’s do it right.

 

tubik studio design quote collection


Welcome to see the designs by Tubik Studio on Dribbble and Behance

invision prototyping tool tubikstudio review

Design Tool Review. Prototyping with InVision.

Prototyping is one of the important stages of efficient UI/UX design process as it allows trying design solutions and test them practically before moving to high-fidelity design polishing as well as product development.

 

In one of our previous articles we have already mentioned the benefits of prototyping for designing strong and positive user experience and reviewed one of popular prototyping tools Pixate. Today we are going to continue this conversation describing the other efficient software for prototyping called InVision.

 

General description of the tool

 

InVision is the comprehensive prototyping software supporting the process of designing user interfaces for mobile applications and other sorts of digital interactive products. Now it is one of the major players on the market, perhaps due to constant improvement and extensions of the functionality which the company adds to the product as well as the strong informative support via their Blog which share diverse cases and articles on design.

 

invision prototyping in tubik studio

The basic idea behind InVision is fast and easy creating live prototype from static images of any fidelity level. The tool provides the ability to upload wireframes which can be more or less detailed and with the functional facilities of the software they are automatically transformed into the prototype of the app. It is possible to follow the necessary transitions, to test the buttons, to analyse the layout in the mock-up of the device interface.

 

tubik studio design

 

Working over numerous project on UI/UX design for mobile applications here in Tubik Studio, we are usually keen to try different tools and software to increase productivity and — what is more important — efficiency of design workflow and communication with the customers. These are the reasons why InVision prototyping tool has become popular here in cases of app design. Being simple and clear in its interface, it doesn’t scare clients who can be easily involved in the process; in addition, it provides numerous functions enabling designers to make the process of testing design faster and easier in terms of productive teamwork.

 

Why should you try prototyping?

 

As we have already mentioned plenty of times in our earlier blog posts, prototyping is the essential stage of design process when user interface for mobile application or a website is created. Being based on our practical experience, we can definitely say that prototyping is the stage when testing can save the time, effort and money.

 

Let’s see, how the process is going on here in the studio. After setting clear objectives for the product, conducting user and market research, defining and analyzing target audience designer starts working on the initial UX design solutions. This is the time when the living organism of the future product gets into its skeleton and all the elements that have to be included start functioning as the united system. The designer thinks over all the layout, forms the group of screens, decides on their functionality and transitions, thinks over the most efficient variants of placement for interactive elements and CTAs. The result of this process, based on great deal of thinking and analysis, is initially given out as a system of UX wireframes. This is usually the set of screens done in limited color palette and its main goal is to set all the logic and functionality of the future application. And this is the high time when the team involved in design process could apply a prototype to make a full analysis of design solutions before starting UI design stage.

 

tubikstudio UX design

 

Lively and clickable prototype tested in the mock-up of an actual device screen you design for is the great and fast way to reveal any sort of problems influencing usability of the product. It lets all sides of the design process – designers, managers, testers and clients – have actual experience of interaction with the future product, to ensure that there are no missing parts or unnecessary steps in the process, to test if all the elements are logical and placed right.

 

The great advantage of InVision tool is that due to its functionality its now rather easy to apply the technology of prototyping, in fact, almost at all the stages of design process as it is not time consuming to upload the static images of the screens and form the prototype with them. That means that it’s possible to start effective testing from the very first groups of screens to see how they provide logic of the layout and transitions.

 

invision prototyping tubikstudio

 

Moreover, in case of using the tool it is also possible to test all the UI decisions in the clickable prototype and see them actively used. The designer can apply animation and simulate gestures using tools’ native functionality to make the prototype felt even more realistic and the experience very close to natural.

 

The power of collaboration

 

What we especially appreciate about InVision software here in Tubik Studio is its strong and constant support of efficient collaboration in design process. Knowing that fast feedback from the client is a vital feature of effective and productive design workflow, creators of this tool made it convenient and clear not only for designers and project managers who are usually fast in dealing with different tools and soft, but also for those customers who are not really avid software users and it takes some effort for them to deal with new tool. InVision has good navigation and is user-friendly for different types of users.

 

The tool enables creators to get a clickable prototype and at the same time to communicate on every smallest part of it. That means clients are able to set their feedback not only to particular screen but even to a particular element of the screen such as button or toggle, shade or shape, piece of copy or graphic icon – anything. It provides the functionality of multiple threads and therefore designers, managers and clients can discuss particular elements quickly and set more productive workflow together.

 

invision prototyping tool tubikstudio review

 

 

Additional features

 

Except the general functionality of prototyping process, some important additional features of the tool should be also mentioned:

 

— Easy and fast integration with other design tools for efficient work, such as Sketch of Photoshop, for example, from which the wireframes can be directly uploaded to InVision.

— Supporting cross-platform experience: the tool provides the ability to set sizes and resolutions of different devices you design for. This feature is highly applicable in the process of responsive design and mobile adaptations.

— Easy control and marking of project statuses for efficient project management.

— Functionality for creating and presenting mood boards, brand boards, galleries and style guides.

— Tools for direct live communication right from the project account. Especially appreciated by the teams working remotely.

— Saving versions history to easily compare several versions of design solutions.

— Diverse functions and features for creating high-fidelity prototypes that can be used for user-testing before the stage of development.

 

invision tool tubik studio review

 

So, the software has shown itself as the important tool improving teamwork and the process of testing design solutions as well as tight collaboration with the customers. Those positions are among the key points of efficient design process providing thought-out, high-quality and user-friendly designs.


Welcome to see the designs by Tubik Studio on Dribbble and Behance

tubik studio freelance teamwork

Design Workstyle. Freelance vs Teamwork.

Modern time and development of technology brought people much more ways and choices of their work style and routine. The broad availability of the Internet and its endless opportunities gave lots of workers, especially in creative spheres, the chance of being more flexible and resourceful about organization of work process which is productive and convenient for all the sides. However, all the styles of work have not only their benefits but also drawbacks, and it’s really important for a professional to consider them before making the choice in favor of the particular working routine.

 

Most of the designers working in Tubik Studio have tried in practice both workstyles which are typical for today’s designers in the sphere of web, app and branding design: most started their path as freelancers before getting into team. So, using the advantage of real life experience we would like to discuss high and low sides of freelance and work in the studio or agency. Obviously, a lot of things have already been discussed in numerous articles over this topic, but, perhaps, our thoughts can also become useful for those who are considering the theme.

tubik designers

 

Freelance

 

No doubt, due to the new technological horizons couple of decades ago freelance became the new and broad perspective of organizing work routine. It opened wide opportunities for those talented people who could not leave their homes, such as for example disabled or parents of babies and toddlers. This kind of workstyle brought easy solutions for a lot of problems and let the people realize their abilities against all the odds, so very soon it was taken over and improved by huge number of professionals in different spheres. The accents moved a bit: a lot of people made the choice of freelancing not because they didn’t need to go to an office but first of all because they could work for themselves and be the only people responsible for their own decisions, choosing the partners or customers and depending on themselves. Freelance workstyle gave them the feeling of freedom.

 

Benefits

— You are free to choose the projects and customers you want or do not want to work for;

— You make your own choice of place and time of work;

— You do not depend on other people and are able to estimate your own productivity;

— You decide what kind of tools to use for any stage of the project you work on;

— You don’t spend money on transport and other costs obvious for those who work in the office;

— You control your workload and decide on the flow and priorities of projects;

— You are totally responsible for your creative decisions and are free to stop work on the project whenever you want.

 

Drawbacks

— Less (or absent) guarantees of successful payment;

— Less (or absent) guarantees of steady workload;

— No support in creative blocks and problematic issues;

— Great amount of time spent on communication with customers, which can be not only time consuming but also highly stressful);

— Work under pressure of responsibility 100% of time;

— Absence or lower amount of live communication with colleagues on regular basis;

— No financial support in cases of sickness or holidays.

 

tubikstudio designer

Studio designer Violetta as well as most other designers in the studio tried the best and the worst of freelancing

 

Responsibilities

— You are the person responsible for communication at all levels;

— You are the person of the business controlling the financial flows, income and expenses;

— You set the deadlines and have to control them by yourself;

— You work from home or any other place and should control the influence of the conditions on your productivity;

— The scope of work you can supply is limited by your personal abilities and talent;

— You have to be strong-willed and highly organized to efficiently separate your work time and personal time.

 

Bottom line

This way of work demands high level of total and absolute responsibility in case the person wants to become really successful rather than just make a living. In the sphere of design you have to become a “Jack of all trades” being able to organize efficient workplace, fast and easy communication, keeping deadlines, controlling finance and improving as a professional all at the same time.

 

Teamwork

 

Talking about design sphere, teamwork usually means that you become a part of design studio or agency. Certainly, this style of work is different from the one described above not only in terms of workflow itself but also in terms of process organization.

 

tubikstudio teamwork

 

Benefits

— In most cases a team consists of diverse professionals in design and this gives a broad space of creativity and high chances of getting involved in complex design projects;

— Work in a team has higher level of stability in workload, planning time and finances;

— In many cases it gives the faster way of successful presenting yourself as for international design community as a result of accumulated efforts of all the team members;

— Teams include not only designers but also managers who are real and important support in terms of communication with customers, including the cases of solving conflicts and misunderstandings that are unavoidable in full-time creative work; moreover, it saves your time which you are able to devote to pure creativity instead of organizational and communication issues;

— Team has a great advantage of brainstorming and collective mind that can become very supportive especially in case of creative block or complex task;

 

project management discussion

 

— Team can take big and complex design projects splitting the parts of it to the designers who are the most capable of producing final result good for all the team productivity;

— Team provides regular communication both with designers and managers which is good for self-improvement and building social relationship;

— You have clear separation of your working space and personal space which is a vital condition of personal comfort for many people;

 

tubik studio

 

— You have a feeling of somebody to back you up that can give you more confidence;

— Team has more variants of promotion and presenting its members. In case of design sphere, it is sometimes less time-consuming and faster way to get involved into the community and take the support and popularity being a part of the team;

 

tubikstudio designers

 

— The flow of information exchange and circulation is much faster and more efficient that increases the level of general team productivity and problem-solving potential;

— Team can bring good friends into your life as well as inspiration and live energy absorbed from the other people around. 

 

tubik studio designers

 

Drawbacks

— You have to organize your routine according to the schedule of work with a team whichever flexible could be the variants offered to you;

— You have to get ready to be a part of a group. That’s vital to know that even presenting yourself as a designer you are working in the team and for the team;

— You are working in a set of restrictions and in many cases you are assigned for the projects, not choosing the tasks but getting them for your consideration and accomplishment.

 

Responsibilities

— You have to be aware that you are the part of team but as well the team is the integral part of your image;

 -You are always involved in more or less active communication flow which is natural for any kind of work. That means that you should take into account interests, habits, characters and thoughts of other people around you;

 -You have to consider not only your personal interests and prospects but also the interests and prospects of the team.

 

tubik studio brainstorm

 

Bottom line

Teamwork has its own responsibilities, seems more than for frellance, although in most cases it is an illusion. Teamwork provides the chance of taking the best from delegating responsibilities between the people who are the best for the role, so a designer has more time for pure design and creative work as well as professional self-improvement not bothering so much about management and organizational issues.

 

tubik studio ceo

 

Conclusion

 

Definitely, none of the benefits or drawbacks are absolute: as all the people are different the methods of workstyle for their best productivity should also be various. No secrets or tricks, just one man’s loss is the other man’s gain. Some of us are amazing team players while the others prefer full responsibility and decision-making only on their own shoulders. None is bad or good, all those things are extremely individual.

tubik studio brainstorm

 

Inside the studio we have gathered people who are consciously keen and able to take all the advantages of teamwork. It never ever means that any of them has lost their freedom, as all people in the studio have enough of their own private space and the chances of work not being disturbed. However, this kind of freedom is always supported with all the team who are invisibly behind you and ready to back up any moment it’s needed. So, we think that teamwork organized wisely and thoughtfully doesn’t take away designers’ individual space or freedom — vise versa, it adds to it the power of solid support and prospective ways for bigger and more complex, therefore more interesting and challenging projects and tasks.


Welcome to see the designs by Tubik Studio on Dribbble and Behance

Tubik Studio Review

Tubik Monthly Review. January

Traditionally, we start a new month in Tubik Studio with a moment of looking back at what has been done in the previous one. New year has started with new interesting projects and concepts, diverse shots on Dribbble, new plans and hopes and new articles in Tubik Blog. So, let’s look a bit closer at what January has brought up.

tubik studio office

 

In January we filled up our Dribbble portfolio with fresh shots featuring concepts for web, app, motion and logo design. Glad to mention that this month brought us two bright debut shots for the team, both featured in Dribbble weekly replays. Here’s the set of January shots.

 

tubik studio design UI

Photo Retouching Service by Alla Kudin

 

tubik studio UI design

HomeBid — Live Furniture Auction by Violetta

 

tubik studio app design

Social Network. UX for Communication by  Marina Yalanska

 

tubik studio app design

Entertainment App by Ludmila Shevchenko

 

tubik studio design

Structure – Architecture Blog by Ernest Asanov

 

tubik studio logo design

Tootl Logo by Ildar Alexandrov

 

tubik studio design

Microinteraction for Macroresult by Marina Yalanska

 

tubik studio web design

Web Template by Sergey Valiukh

 

tubik studio design

Weather Concept by Tamara

 

tubik studio design UI

Weather in UI Design by Marina Yalanska

 

tubik studio UI design

Messenger App by Ludmila Shevchenko

 

tubik studio design UI

Randomizer concept by Vladyslav Taran

 

tubik studio web template

Luxury Real Estate Web Template by Sergey Valiukh

 

tubik studio UI design

Offer App Coupon by Daria

 

tubik studio UI design

Case Study. Saily UI Design by Marina Yalanska

 

We also had an active month publishing new articles in Tubik Blog. In case you could miss something, let’s review the topics of the month:

  • Social Network Design. UX for Communication. The article gathering general points important to consider in the process of creating efficient UI/UX design for social networks of different kinds
  • UI Animation. Microinteraction for Macroresult. The article considering use and purpose of interface animation in UI/UX design in the aspect of efficient microinteractions. Supported with practical ideas and examples from Tubik Studio team.
  • FAQ Design Platform. Diversity of the Job. The fresh set of frequently asked questions about design in new FAQ Design Platform issue. This time it reviewed popular questions about different aspects of digital design as a job. Based on Tubik Studio answers at Quora.
  • Weather in UI Design. Come Rain or Shine. The article about some principles and practical ideas about UI design for weather applications and widgets. Supported with weather concepts by Tubik Studio designers.
  • Project Management. Design Process Backstage. The article considering the role of project management in successful design process. Here we gathered some important points and practical tips from Tubik Studio Project Manager.
  • Case Study: Saily App. Designing UI. The second case study about design for Saily App. This time it is devoted to description of user interface design for the application and packed with loads of images and animations to show more about the process.

Tubik design studio

 

As usual, we had a lot of everyday bright and memorable moments of team work, communication, creativity and rest, posted regularly for our over 15K followers in studio Instagram page.

tubik studio designer

 

Also, we shared our ideas and thoughts via Medium, WordPress and Quora and kept everyone updated with studio news via Twitter, Tumblr and Flipboard.

tubik studio on medium

So, leaving one more dynamic month behind, all the team is full of inspiration looking forward to new interesting and active work.


Welcome to see the designs by Tubik Studio on Dribbble and Behance

Tubik Studio Project management

Project Management. Design Process Backstage

Behind every complex and responsible project in any creative sphere you will find not only creators but also a person or people who support them in this process. They take a lot on their own shoulders to enable all the complicated mechanism of project accomplishment run like clockwork. They communicate the customers, set and follow keeping the deadlines, solve misunderstandings, explain all the issues to all the sides of the process, and sometimes really need to be strong enough to stop the creator when he or she goes too far from the task. They need to know all the details and parts of the process to work like the conductors controlling the orchestra at every single sound to perform the successful and satisfying result. They are project managers.

tubik studio designers and managers

Studio designers and project managers brainstorming

 

Today we decided to think over this important part of design process which is constantly proved as one of the keys to efficient performance and high productivity.

 

The essence of project management

 

Project management actually could be defined as the process of supporting and maintaining efficient, fast and productive communication between all the sides of the project (customer(s), designer(s), developer(s), sales manager(s) etc.) Actually, project manager is a specialist who provides communication of all levels and general supervision of all the process, obtains and processes necessary information, together with the creator estimates time of accomplishment for the design task and – one of the hardest things for creative guys! — follows and keeps the deadlines, pulling all the ropes necessary to do it.

 

One of the famous American speakers and specialists in human behavior Denis Waitley said: “Expect the best, plan for the worst, and prepare to be surprised”. That is a really exact description of project management process in design, full of surprises, discussions, disagreements and iterations, but still working much better when carefully planned and controlled.

 

Project Management in practice

 

One of Tubik Studio project managers Olena is sincerely keen to tell our readers a bit more about the backstage of design process in the perspective of project management as the supportive link between designers and customers. Having extensive experience of working on diverse design projects, she emphasizes that a lot of points in creating handy UX/UI design features are put to use by studio team on a daily basis and that is the result of talents working on the basis of good team spirit and efficient organization. So, let’s catch up with her practical ideas based on devoted work in design field.

project manager tubik studio

Project manager Olena and UI/UX designer Violetta discussing feedback from customers 

 

Aiming at individuality and uniqueness of every product we tackle, sheer application of modern design strategies and tendencies seems not enough to end up with fruitful results. It is important also not to give a miss to what stands behind the actual workflow and how projects are carried out from an organizational point of view. Accordingly, Olena would like to share some project management tips today, focusing on high performance leverages.

 

To start off, let’s shed some light upon the importance of boosting designers’ efficiency. The issue is quite simple in theory and surprisingly complex in practice: happy designers do great job! Eager to work, they think out-of-the-box, put forward original and working solutions to any challenge they face. In addition, they stick to deadlines and, even if timeframes are a bit exceeded, your customers feel satisfied since they know for sure that designer works his/her fingers to the bone, brainstorming and trying out all possible means to breathe life into the project. Sounds good, doesn’t it? Here are a few points which can break the ice and trigger off designers’ creativity and energy to work.

tubik studio project manager designers

Project manager Olga and studio designers testing the upcoming app

 

Project Manager’s practical tips

 

1. Customer and Designer: two peas in a pod.

Do not forget that each stakeholder thinks differently. In other words, you have to be aware that customers and designers take things individually. The former are inclined to conjure up future design mostly from a layman’s perspective while the latter add professional touch which sometimes contradicts to what your customer wants.

 

No need to explain how stressful such a situation is for each party. The role of a project manager here is to bridge the gap between both. You need to explain your customer that designer struggles for the best outcome: modern approach, usability, high conversion rate, etc. On the other hand, be obstinate to persuade designer that some sacrifices to his/her concept will do no harm to the project and there are often ways to reach consensus thanks to alternative solutions.

 

tubik studio brainstorm

Dive deep into creative process

 
Moreover, prove both parties have an opportunity to talk to each other because personal involvement makes wonders and conciliates contradictory points of view. The more they communicate, the more plausible chances are they will head for the same goal in the same direction.

 

2. Be a source of inspiration.

It does not mean you should turn into a fairy godmother. You just need to keep your designer’s creative poise. This is a tricky task as we are all human beings with mood swings, up and downs of life, weather sensitivity — anyone can insert one more million reasons here.

 

However, either down in the dumps or on cloud nine, it is crucial to stay professional and cope with constantly upcoming tasks. You cannot be a saviour to your designer’s life breakdowns, but, luckily enough, there is a hot tip to rouse their creativity from slumbers. English proverb saying that “Patience is a plaster for all sores” is an ideal piece of advice for a PM, though it does not answer the question how to deal with crestfallen designers.

 

Just try to put forward as many ideas to project as you can. They may be totally absurd or useful — the designer you work with will benefit from each! In the worst course of events any professional would not put up with silly and unpractical recommendations. Normally, they get a bit irritated at subliminal level due to weird suggestions which cranks up the mechanism of contradiction. A person tries to bring about some ideas out of accord with what you offer. Needless to say, their ideas are full of professionalism and determination. Whenever you toss up useful suggestions, they can be further developed and polished by the expert, but at least he/she would climb out of the stagnation pit.

 

tubik studio project management

Project management is all about support

 

In any case, this unobvious brainstorm brings high chances of boosting performance and keeping the designer inspired.

 

3. Find a personal approach to everyone.
It is not about an assembly line, there isn’t a comprehensive method to manage everyone and everything. Some people prefer working on their own mostly, so if that is the case of yours, do not poke your nose into what they do five times a day. Try to avoid disturbing them, referring generally for management issues only. Your golden rule is to do your best to ensure people can seek your help any time.

 

tubik studio project manager

 

 
Independent and resilient designers will still appeal to you when they need whereas shy personalities will pluck at you as a drowning man at a straw. On the contrary, some designers are more productive when they have someone to discuss project with. Do not let him/her feel forlorn and desperate. Be there for support! This not only makes the designer you work with feel better, but also contributes to your own deeper insight into the project flow.

 

To sum up, stay creative and do not forget: it is designers who play a key role in the project but you are the one who sets the pace. Be a conductor to make your orchestra perform successfully on the world stage.


Welcome to see the designs by Tubik Studio on Dribbble and Behance